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INDIAN TIGER PARTY

Feb. 27, 1956
Feb. 27, 1956

Table of Contents
Feb. 27, 1956

Events & Discoveries
Spectacle
  • In Cooch Behar, the grand-style tiger hunt of legend carries on unchanged in pomp and ceremony and as luxuriously as ever

The Wonderful World Of Sport
The Westminster
Sporting Look
  • The fashions in dogs were not the only news at the Westminster. A surprising number of male bipeds with doggy connections managed to look pretty doggy themselves in various choices of head coverings

Big Three
Anniversary

INDIAN TIGER PARTY

In Cooch Behar, the grand-style tiger hunt of legend carries on unchanged in pomp and ceremony and as luxuriously as ever

The favorite diversion of the Maharaja of Cooch Behar, ruler of a princely state of northeast India, is carrying on his grandfather's traditional tiger shoots from the backs of elephants. True, the once private tiger tamasha is now open to paying guests who apply to the Maharaja's Himalayan Shikar Syndicate. But as far as custom is concerned everything is about the same as it was 100 years ago. Indian shikar life has all the luxuries of a Grand Hotel in the jungle. At sundown guests gather in a circle (right) for cocktails; a retinue of manservants stands ready to attend to every want; there is ice for the drinks and even hot water to shave with. On top of this, and the sights and sounds of the Indian jungle, there is big game hunting as Kipling knew it. For a firsthand report on the hunt, see Film Director John Huston's article on page 19.

This is an article from the Feb. 27, 1956 issue Original Layout

Elephant caravan of hunters and beaters moves off through the high grass and brush in search of tigers. Huston and the other members of the party ride in howdah on elephant's back.

Hunting party, including staff of green-turbaned mahouts sitting astride gaily decorated elephants, lines up for inspection on first day before commencement of organized drive for game.

Jungle-Edge Picnic is enjoyed by hunters John Huston (left), Mr. and Mrs. Walter Buchen of Chicago, T. Wynyard Pasley of New York, Major Parbat Singh and Mr. and Mrs. Felix Fenston of Guildford, England.

FOUR PHOTOSYLLAPHOTOYLLAAS ELEPHANTS APPROACH CAUTIOUSLY, HUSTON (RIGHT) PEERS OVER MAHOUT'S HEAD TO INSPECT KILL