19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

March 05, 1956

A PHALANX OF MOOCHERS
Sirs:
The height of the golden era of West Coast football, 1925, was also the year of my graduation from the University of Washington (SI, Feb. 20). That the once proud Husky football squad has turned into a row of mendicants with their begging bowls outstretched is a sickening spectacle. It may be true that a player "maintaining required proficiency in his studies should...be able to devote the hours he must spend on his on-campus job to his studies" but academic proficiency hardly necessitates holiday trips for his sister, himself and his wife, free theater tickets and a car because he had a new baby. These are no less than handouts to a phalanx of moochers and I am ashamed of and for them.
ALICE BENNETTS McBYDE
Washington, D.C.

NEW FACE AT WASHINGTON STATE
Sirs:
I am an old coach myself, and Jim Sutherland's wail of self-pity ("I'm the fall guy in this thing. Any transgression of mine in this football situation was an unwitting, well-meaning thing") moved me—but in the wrong direction. I was moved to wonder what standards governed the authorities of Washington State College in hiring such a man as coach, and to speculate further on the reactions of the players' parents to the prospect of having their sons indoctrinated in the "character-building" techniques of Mr. Sutherland.

Maybe old Jim ("I was just trying an experiment") convinced them that a massive infusion of the Sutherland technique was just what the boys needed.
MURRELL EDMUNDS
New Orleans

A WORD FROM THE SPONSOR
Sirs:
I found your article on the mess at Washington extremely interesting. Mr. Torrance is the chairman of the regulation committee of the Pacific Northwest Association of the AAU. His signature appears on all AAU membership cards that have on them the Amateur Athletic Code of Honor. This code includes the following statement, "...and that I will constantly strive to uphold the ethics of amateur sport."

You also failed to mention the fact that it was the Faculty Athletic Committee of the University of Washington that did most of the interviewing and made most of the findings and then reported to the Board of Regents.
GLENN GARY HUDSON
Westtown, Pa.

A FEW QUESTIONS
Sirs:
It would be very interesting if Washington University officials would answer such questions as:

What percent of the student body not on athletic scholarship actually engages in varsity football? How many undergraduate scholarships are awarded by the athletic department as compared to the number given out by, say, the English, physics, history, engineering and chemistry departments? Do these departments also recruit high school students?

And there's an even better question proposed by Mr. Torchy Torrance of Seattle: "Do you want me to sit here and agree with you that we should let just anybody, the average student, take over the football and athletic situation at the university?"

And we gripe because Russian athletes are supposedly subsidized.
FRANK WELDER
Uvalde, Texas

•Only the few men specifically brought to college to play football and subsidized by athletic scholarships participate in the Washington football program, although theoretically any eligible student is welcome to give it a try. The remainder of the 14,500 student body, Mr. Torrance's "average students," is encouraged to furnish spontaneous enthusiasm in the cheering section and at rallies. The athletic department annually awards 75 scholarships, most-of them to football and basketball players. All other university departments combined are allowed 300 scholarships with which, through the Division of High School Student Relations and Orientation, they seek to attract top high school scholars as university students.—ED.

OLYMPIC RUNNERS
Sirs:
In Jimmy Jemail's Feb. 20 HOTBOX, Cola G. Parker, president, National Association of Manufacturers, suggests that trap shooting should be included on the Olympic program, and asks if we could trust the Russians with guns in the Olympics.

I refer him to your excellent article on the World Championships in Caracas, Venezuela last year in which you reported on the Soviet efficiency (SI, Jan. 31, 1955).

Renville H. McMann, president, U.S. Lawn Tennis Association, suggests that tennis should be included and should be run by the people who govern it, not by the outsiders who know little about the game. It is my understanding that all sports in the Olympic Games are governed by the international sports governing bodies, while the International Olympic Committee lays down the rules of eligibility for the competitors. For example, the track and field events will be controlled by the International Amateur Athletic Federation. I have no idea of what happened in the 1924 Olympic Games nor do I know how long it has been since the associations have run their respective events in the Olympic Games.
FREDERICK N. A. ROWELL
Vancouver, B.C.

•Prior to 1908 the International Olympic Committee governed each Olympic event. From 1908 to 1924 the governing boards of the country sponsoring the games were the supervisors. Since then each sport is governed by an international federation. In 1924, the last time that tennis was an Olympic event, the international body was severely criticized for improper and inefficient management of the events. Vincent Richards and Helen Wills emerged as the gold medalists. However, if tennis were again to be included it would be run by an international body.—Ed.

SCORE CARD
Sirs:
Harry Weetman's 58 over a full-size golf course is a remarkable achievement. Can you print a copy of his score card, preferably with the lengths of the holes and par for each. What did he get on the remaining five holes to go with the 10 birdies and three eagles?

As an ardent but very poor golfer I am very much interested in his card.
JOHN C. CRENSHAW JR.
Shreveport, La.

•Weetman, one of Britain's Ryder Cup golfers, played Croham Hurst, his home course in Croydon, England. Like most English courses, Croham Hurst uses the bogey system rather than the more demanding par concept. Only one round comparable to Harry Weetman's is officially known: in 1914 J.L. Black played the 6,000-yard Claremont, Calif. course in 58 strokes. Weetman's hole-by-hole record:

[originallink:10466376:42741]

Hole

Yards

Bogey

Score

1

420

5

3

2

443

5

4

3

284

4

3

4

308

4

3

5

158

3

2

6

364

4

4

7

452

5

4

8

367

4

4

9

446

5

4

10

174

3

2

11

410

5

3

12

163

3

3

13

459

5

4

14

125

3

2

15

518

5

3

16

218

3

3

17

352

4

4

18

410

4

3

6,071

74

58

—ED.

BONEFISH SUPREME
Sirs:
In Jimmy Jemail's Feb. 6th column a question was put to many and sundry fishermen about what they believed to be the most exciting fish to catch. Not one mention was made of the lordly bonefish.

Please be informed that for those in the know there is no fish quite like the bone-fish. For pure fishing skill, utter excitement, strenuous exercise and pleasant diversion the bonefish rates supreme.

I have fished in many waters in many places and have caught many types of fish, including practically all of those that were mentioned in Jemail's column, so I speak with the authority of one who does not tell fish tales.
SIDNEY G. STRICKER JR.
New York

BARNIE OF THE EVERGLADES
Sirs:
Congratulations to John O'Reilly on Barnie's Beauties (SI, Feb. 20), as well as the beautiful bird photographs by David Goodnow.

Barnie Parker, the Everglades ranger, got broken in, if I am not mistaken, on that kind of work while serving as warden for our society before the Everglades National Park was established. I have had many delightful experiences in the Cape Sable-Shark River country with Barnie. John O'Reilly's characterization of him is wonderfully good.

It is our confident belief that you will find that bird pictures and articles such as those are of great interest to a great percentage of your readers.

JOHN H. BAKER
President
Natl. Audubon Society
New York

OLYMPIC CASTING
Sirs:
Add all the world's golfers, tennis players, jai alainiks, lacrosse afficionados, American footballers and squash racketers together, throw in Jimmy Jemail and the 11 who answered his HOTBOX question in the Feb. 20 SI and you still do not have a good-sized patch on the greatest participant sport in all the world, to wit, fishing.

The salt-water sport of surf casting, and the fresh-water sports of fly and bait casting are nearer to being included in the Olympic Games than any of the activities mentioned in the answers solicited by Mr. Jemail.

The International Casting Federation is a worldwide organization which is presently setting up specifications to standardize competition among casters from the several countries of the world, especially the western countries.

Casting may not be in there in '56 but it looks like it will make the games in '60.

And from the way things are going, Uncle Sam may need the points. I think we can win, since fishing is the most widespread sport in the U.S.A., and widespread participation seems to be the secret of success in the Olympics.
JERRY JANSEN
New York

•For an unusual tournament (Ted Williams vs. Sam Snead vs. sailfish) see WONDERFUL WORLD, Page 26—ED.

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
Sirs:
Am in a condition which can only be described as laughing paroxysmal happy knolluria over Hot Words at Happy Knoll.

My physician says I've been sinking slowly since mention of Old Ned's being "put" in the men's locker room. In the event of my passing, please advise Mr. Magill I shall liberally endow Hard Hollow.
DICK KING
Iowa City

CADDIES OF HAPPY KNOLL—UNITE
Sirs:
Heaven knows I am no Jeffersonian New Dealer and have never been able to think of Mr. Truman as a modern Andrew Jackson, but my sympathies are with Oscar J. Beight, courageous champion of Happy Knoll's caddies (SI, Feb. 20). Enclosed you will find my contribution towards the establishment, through the U.S. Olympic Fund, of the Happy Knoll Caddie Union, Oscar J. Beight Local No. 1.

May it never be said that I, through these many decades, have ever forgotten my youthful days of tramping the links caddying for some of the most miserable specimens of ill-tempered, miser-pursed hackers on the eastern seaboards.
FRANCIS O'B. DOUGHERTY
New York

OAK RIDGE OLYMPIC FUND
Sirs:
Enclosed you will find checks for the total of $62.70, which is to go to the U.S. Olympic Fund.

The largest amount of money has been given by Oak Ridge youngsters who, more than we adults it seems, are solidly behind our Olympic team.

I have organized an Oak Ridge Olympic team fund to which the money has been contributed, but please don't feel that I am taking credit for this contribution. It comes from many persons in Oak Ridge. I act as a gathering place on the local level and my own donation, which is included in the total, was given because I, like the rest, am an American.
JIM RYAN
Oak Ridge, Tenn.

•Happy Knoll is delighted to be able to continue its Olympic Fund with these checks from Oak Ridge, and also happily acknowledges additional contributions from the following:

John Mahony, Miami; Roger Moore, Los Alamos; David Bock, Los Angeles; Clinton Kanaga, Kansas City; Alma H. Paquin, Francis A. Paquin and E. L. Chadbourne, Bennington, Vt.; Jerry R. Crandall, Eugene, Ore.; Dr. Ambrose Hampton, New Orleans; Robert Rohacek, Racine, Wis.; Richard Nelson, San Francisco; Louisa Herzfeld, Baltimore; James Baker, San Francisco; Pat Sexton, Baltimore; Georgina Kilmeyer, Lebanon, Pa.; Mrs. Jack Mittelman, Philadelphia; Henry Schutz, Clifton, N.J.; Douglas Wall, Gary, Ind.; Dorothy Boyd, Medford, Ore.; T. G. Hagens, Collingswood, N.J.; D. W. Bennett, Merion Station, Pa.; W. Evans, Everett, Wash.; Margery Osterhoudt, Shelton, Conn.; Edwin Lewis, Baltimore; Jack McNeill, Wynnewood, Pa.; Richard Bentel, Fairmont, W. Va.; Ruth Foster, Ilion, N.Y.; Bob Anderson, Torrington, Conn.; Mrs. Bruce Henry, Decatur, Ga.; H. G. Ahlquist, McKeesport, Pa.; George Lawrence, Concord, N.H.; Peter Denis, Montreal; Leo Brady, Pittsburgh; Clint Hopson, Downey, Calif.; Bill McIvor, Philadelphia; Bob Smith, Oxford, Ohio; Gary Schnitzer, Portland, Ore.; Joe Greer, Yakima, Wash.; John Mather, USAF; Sally Foulks, Atwood, Kans.; Loyal Payne, Ames, Iowa; Larry Cooper, Waukesha, Wis.; Gladys Woolf, New York; George Everest, Nashville; Mary Burbank, Reading, Pa.; Wharton Snell, Los Angeles; Ray Cradling, Rome, Ga.; Willis Havemeyer, Boston; Janet Miller, Rome, Italy; John Flexners, New York; Morris Trefner, Philadelphia; John Treaners, Pittsfield, Mass.; Gloria Feinstein, Cincinnati; Brant Herggerman, Portland, Me.; Jean Fulsom, Miami; Robert Harrison, Savannah, Ga.; William Fuerstner, New York; Gaynor Willoughby, Pittsburgh; Frank Lipkowitz, Brooklyn; Mary Jane de Witt, Medford, Mass.; Terry Wotanberg, Detroit; Henley Bright, Los Angeles; Douglas Brody, Williamsburg, Va.; Pat Douglas, Newark; Joan Vermeer, Ann Arbor, Mich.; George Jenkins, Cambridge, Mass.; Mervin Heckling, College Park, Md.; Henry Greenough, Ardmore, Pa.—ED.

NOW I ADMIT IT
Sirs:
When my husband remarked he was to receive a new sports magazine in the mail, I really hit the roof. Budgetwise I was sure he should be content with watching sports on TV but the anticipation with which he awaits your magazine each Thursday is more than for any favorite TV performance. He calls from the office, "Did my magazine come?" And when he gets home, supper's over and children in bed, "Boy, do I enjoy reading this 19TH HOLE—listen to this." And before he's through, I have to admit I have read SI already after it came in afternoon mail. Then he really has to laugh, and WE'LL certainly make room in our budget for each renewal notice.

It is really heart-warming to be able to read a paragraph written by a professor of Christian education of Yale University and an editor's quote from I Corinthians 9:24-27. More of us should certainly be thankful for living in a country where these words can be printed and those two paragraphs alone have certainly added to my approval of SI.
MRS. JUNE OTTO
Decatur, Ill.

FATHER AND DAUGHTER ACT
Sirs:
My 17-year-old daughter is an avid reader of my copy of SI. She is not just a sitter-on-the-sidelines enthusiast either, as she is captain of her high school basketball team.

Last week I brought home SI and before I had a chance to look at it, she was deep into it.

She rushed in to me a short while later raving about the pole vault picture (SI, Feb. 13) and I had to agree with her that the picture was outstanding.
GEORGE McGRATH
New York

•And when Father got his chance to read SI, Barbara told us about it—see below.—ED.

Sirs:
The pole vault picture was one of the most dramatic pictures in color I've ever seen. It had everything—congratulations to Hy Peskin!
BARBARA McGRATH
New York

FATHER AND SON ACT
Sirs:
I note a letter from Daniel McMasters of Los Angeles (19TH HOLE, Feb. 13), recalling the glory of Speed Skater Ed Lamy of Saranac Lake.

You might be interested in a picture (see cut) of his son, Jim Lamy, one of our leading bobsledders who served as brakeman on the American No. 1 four-man sled which took a third place at the recent Olympics in Cortina.

Ed Lamy himself is still around and well, the same is true of Jack Shea of Lake Placid to whom Mr. McMasters also referred.
JAMES LOEB JR.
Saranac Lake, N.Y.

THREE ILLUSTRATIONS© AJAYMR. CAPER ILLUSTRATION"Takes all the fun out of it somehow, doesn't it?" PHOTOJIM LAMY

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)