The Question: What's wrong with your husband's golf?

April 16, 1956

THE DUCHESS OF WINDSOR
Paris and New York
Not a thing. The Duke has never played a better game. He divides his leisure time between golf and gardening and is entirely relaxed when playing. David is not a large man, but he takes a full swing and is precise with his strokes. I wasn't there, but a friend told me he broke 80 the other day.

MRS. GORDON McLINTOCK
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy
Kings Point, N.Y.
Admiral McLintock loves the game, but he enjoys working with the midshipmen much more. He takes much of his work to our private quarters. So he tees off only occasionally at the Garden City Golf Club. Consequently, he is a much better navigator than he is a golfer.

MRS. WILLIAM F. HUTTON
Old Westbury, N.Y.
That's obviously intended as a humorous question. Otherwise, why would you ask me and not his golf pro? I'm not devoid of humor, but the question has no humor because there's nothing wrong with his golf. He plays a perfect game. Check his pals at the N.Y. Stock Exchange.

MRS. JOHN ISARD
Savoy-Plaza Hotel, New York
For excellence of play, he's hopeless. That I don't mind. What annoys me is the game itself. It's the only male invention that's succeeded in separating a man from his wife. I wouldn't care if he played purely for beneficial exercise, but I don't like being a golf widow because of the 19th Hole.

MRS. ESTES KEFAUVER
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Estes played football in college. He didn't play golf, the one game that would have been beneficial all his life. I started golf at nine. I occasionally play in the low 80s. Estes can't match my score so he won't play with me. He could have been a great golfer. What a pity!

MRS. VIRGINIA MAYFIELD
Houston, Texas
Nothing. The trouble is with his clubs. They have too much pitch or too little pitch. Or his caddie gives him the wrong club. When playing with others he is gentlemanly and considerate, but when playing with me, his disposition completely changes. He's impatient, saying that I'm overcoached.

MRS. PHILIP T. DROTNING
Madison, Wis.
He overpays the caddies. It's his money, but I'm tired of those sensational shots from the deep woods. Johnny Podres should have an arm like those caddies. He's seldom on the fairway and never has a poor lie to kick about. Caddies do the kicking. I'm not saying he cheats. That's golf—and fun.

MRS. F. WILLIAM (TOPSY) CARR
Corpus Christi, Texas
Bill is a confoundedly good golfer, but he plays too hard at the game. Because he plays so hard at it, he goes all over the country. All I do is stay home, twiddle my fingers and keep the home fires burning. But I'm not complaining. We Texas wives want our husbands to excel in everything.

MRS. NORM BARRY
Chicago, Ill.
It's a dope he's addicted to. He plays constantly, April till November. I hope he can some day lick minor problems like woods zigging when irons are zagging. But when lawn lacks lowering, walk wants watering and wife wishes wooing, his refuge is a talk with the Lord on the subject.

MRS. JOHN D. O'SHEA
Lincolnwood, Ill.
Nothing, except that all summer long he's a stranger. I play golf, too. Our dinner goes to pot until the season is over. I tee off before breakfast and John tees off in the late afternoon. So we do our gossiping in the bathroom between shaving and showers and wave to each other across the fairways.

MRS. ROBERT L. KASHA
Wichita, Kans.
He has every confidence when doing his surgery, but not with golf. When he tees off, the tee is too short, the course too long. Off the tee, the ball is too small; on the green, it's too large. He finishes in a state of muscular confusion. John could solve it by playing the 19th hole—first.

MRS. AVERELL HARRIMAN
Governor's mansion, Albany, N.Y.
My husband doesn't have a golf game. He's not old enough.

THIRTEEN PHOTOS

NEXT WEEK:

Who will win in your league next year? (Asked of wives of major league managers.)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)