THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

May 27, 1956

PORTRAIT OF A PLUSH HORSE
Plushest horse in Thoroughbred history, after his victory in the Camden Handicap last week brought his total winnings to $1,100,365, was Nashua, shown here in all his flawless beauty and conformation in a never-before-published oil portrait by W. Smithson Broadhead. The painting originally included at left the late William Woodward Jr. and Mrs. Woodward, who had so often stood with him in the winners' circle. After the tragedy which ended Bill Woodward's life, Broadhead substituted likenesses of himself and his wife. Others are Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons, Eddie Arcaro and Groom Al Robertson. The up-to-date arithmetic of Nashua's fabulous get-rich-quick career reveals that in his 42 minutes in public on the track he has run 25½ miles, collecting $26,199 a minute or $43,152 a mile, for his work

BOBO AT SUNSET
In the descending Pacific sun at Los Angeles, Ray Robinson, the rage of battle yet upon his face, towers over an opponent who could not rise again. This tableau, which marked the end of Bobo Olson's fighting career, recalled to fight fans the great days of daylight fights, now all but ended by television's glare (See page 37 for a word picture of the fight)

FUTURE WRECKING CREW
They call themselves Rambling Wrecks at Georgia Tech, a notion these Tech players obviously take seriously in spring practice. "Hit 'em harder!" yells Assistant Coach John Bell, urging space-suited defensive team to outslug varsity. Players start with feet astride boards to encourage straight-drive blocking. For more on spring drills see page 39

PHOTO
PHOTOHY PESKIN PHOTOJAY B. LEVITON

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)