IN ANY LANGUAGE...IT'S STILL A RHUBARB

June 24, 1956

Baseball has been a part of the national scene in Italy for only a short while—since the Americans invaded Salerno in 1943. It still must go a long way to catch up to the U.S. brand of play, but in one department, the rhubarb, it ranks second to none. The word closest to rhubarb in Italian is "zuffa," which means tussle or scrimmage. For an account of what caused the magnificent zuffa in the recent Class C game between two Roman rivals pictured on these pages and for a general run-down on the state of Italian baseball today turn the page

'STRIKE—BALL' IS UMPIRE'S SHAKY DECISION

'TRULY, CAN THIS BE POSSIBLE?' STUNNED CATCHER ASKS THE IMPLACABLE ARBITRO

GESTURING, IMPASSIONED UMP ARGUES BACK

Drama ends in bloodshed. Mustached pitcher (far left) can take it no longer, bops umpire on snoot. Arbitro, falling back (above), is treated for a nosebleed.

FIVE PHOTOSTONY VACCARO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)