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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

July 30, 1956
July 30, 1956

Table of Contents
July 30, 1956

Milwaukee Braves
Events & Discoveries
The Wonderful World Of Sport
The Manager
  • In the dimly lit world of boxing, the classic—and therefore most closely guarded—relationship is that between the manager and fighter. One of the few persons ever permitted to penetrate the protective shadow which conceals their everyday dealings is Robert H. Boyle. On the pages that follow, Boyle recounts his conversations with a manager and a fighter on a day climaxed by a bout. For reasons which are obvious, the names of the principals are withheld. The facts are not.

Acknowledgments
The Outdoor Week
  • Edited by Tom Lineaweaver

    Based on regular weekly dispatches from SI bureaus and special correspondents in the U.S., Canada. Mexico and overseas; and on reports from fish and game commissions of the 48 states and Alaska

Uncle Lou's Dream Boat
Sports Of The Presidents
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

GOLDEN AGE FOR KIDS

This is an article from the July 30, 1956 issue Original Layout

Though the thought couldn't have been further from their minds or their kids' minds, the parents of 105 New York suburban kids were writing a new chapter in the social and economic history of the U.S. last week when 105 Blue Jays jammed the starting line in the Larchmont, N.Y. Junior Day championships. Most of the Jays were new (there aren't many old Blue Jays, since the class is only eight years old), and each one represented a parental investment of about $950, complete with racing sails. Times 105, that makes a rough outlay of $100,000 to provide a summer's fun for a few kids.

This is one more powerful example of the golden age of sports that today's children are living through, a time when they have more opportunity to do more things well than any other generation ever had.

Go back only 16 or 17 years, to a place like Barnegat Bay in New Jersey. In 1939 a kid who wanted to sail got a 12-foot Sneak Box, worth maybe $115 new. But nobody had a new boat. You inherited one from your cousin who had gone up into the Scows. Or take baseball. In the early '40s a kids' ball game was still a pickup affair that happened on a backlot with a rock for home plate and weeds to your knees in the outfield. Now, some 15 years later, hundreds of thousands of uniformed Little Leaguers, P-O-N-Y Leaguers, Babe Ruth Leaguers, and so forth, play out summer-long schedules on manicured diamonds, some with sunken dugouts, mechanical scoreboards and other appurtenances.

It is the same all through sports. Nowadays parents are digging deep in their pockets to provide better recreation for their children and, at the same time, building a generation of intense sports lovers who can pass on an even greater affection for sport to their own children. Today's golden age may be only a small indication of the bigger things to come.

PRESS THE FLESH

A handshake—be it a compliment from the soft palm of royalty, from the eager palm of business or from the bitter palm of the vanquished—is the wordless hurrah which need overcome no language barrier to pay the victor a tribute, grudging or not

Royal Duke is extended to Dr. Roger Bannister, the first four-minute miler, by smiling Queen Elizabeth at Britain's Amateur Athletic Association Championships. Duke of Edinburgh stands at Queen's side as she receives British athletes at White City Stadium.

Glad hand is thrust in thanks by ex-Ohio State All-America Howard (Hopalong) Cassady (center), who matches grins with Edwin J. Anderson, president of the Detroit Lions, after Hoppy signed $29,000 two-year contract. Mrs. Cassady also gets into the act, grips Hoppy.

Sugar shake goes to Mrs. Virginia Peace of San Diego as she collects $20,887.20 from John S. Alessio, director of Mexico's Caliente race track. Mrs. Peace picked five out of six winners in a betting pool for Caliente's record payoff.

Diplomatic grip is given to U.S. track star Bob Mathias by Azouz Rebai, Tunisian Secretary of State for Youth and Sports, after presenting Mathias with the "Nichan Iftikhar," one of Tunisia's highest decorations. Mathias is on a good-will tour of Africa.

Cool clasp going away is the best Golfer Tommy Bolt (above) can manage after losing 1 up to Charlie Prentice (right) in PGA championships at Canton, Mass. Bolt, who was favored to beat Prentice, then stalked away in disgust.

Hearty Mitt goes to defending champion Pat Lesser of Seattle (left) from loser Barbara Mclntire of Toledo after second-round match in the Women's Western Amateur Golf Championship at Huntington, W. Va. Miss Lesser won 1 up.

Shake and make up was the ruling Cincinnati Judge Clarence Denning handed Dodger Duke Snider (left) and Cincinnati fan Ralph Baumel of Mason, Ohio. The two had exchanged punches after Baumel asked if Snider was "gutless."

A TABLEAU OF DEEP MISERY

Even world champions like the Brooklyn Dodgers have moments when nothing goes right, such as that caught by a camera behind home plate during their fourth straight loss to Milwaukee on their latest western trip. Manager Walter Alston and players glumly await Relief Pitcher Clem Labine to rescue Sal Maglie from distress

FRESH HARVEST OF RHUBARBS

Soaring temperatures and the heat of the pennant chase produce a midsummer madness in baseball which is a delight to the fan and a blight to the nerve-racked manager

Stalking from the mound, Brooklyn Dodger Pitcher Don Newcombe glares daggers at Manager Walter Alston (left) after Alston yanked him for threatening to bean Chicago Cub batters. Newk made bean threat after he had been dusted twice at bat.

Spitting his contempt at critical Boston baseball writers, Ted Williams crosses plate after slamming his 400th home run.

Turning tail, Giant Pitcher Ruben Gomez chooses discretion, not valor, after deliberately throwing at Braves' Joe Adcock.

PHOTOMORRIS ROSENFELDPHOTOHY PESKINMANAGER ALSTON (24) ANXIOUSLY TOES THE MOUND WHILE MAG LIE (FAR LEFT) ANGRILY SULKS AND LA BINE SAUNTERS IN FROM THE BULLPEN. OTHER MOURNERS ARE (L TO R) CHICO FERNAN PEE WEE REESE, RUBE WALKER, GIL HODGES, AND DUKE SNIDERPHOTOOUTRAGED BUT STILL OUTTHREE PHOTOSCARLOS BERNIER, TEMPERAMENT BOY OF THE HOLLYWOOD STARS, MAKES LIKE NIJINSKI AS HE EMOTES THROUGH A THEATRICAL PROTEST. UNMOVED. UMPIRE PAT ORR REFUSES TO BREAK STRIDE, STEPS ON THE DANCER'S FOOTTEN PHOTOS