ARE WOMEN PEOPLE? OH, BROTHER!
Sirs:
Mr. Marquand's vitriolic lady member (Are Women People at Happy Knoll?, SI, July 23) is unfortunately not a figment of the author's imagination. Today every golf club in the country has its Lydia Feltons, and I am sorry to say they have changed what used to be a meeting place of like-minded friends for the purpose of getting some exercise into a progressive day camp for adolescents and their footloose mothers.

Consider, for example, the changes that have taken place within the last few years at the club of which I have been a longtime member. Seven years ago we had a small club of about 65 active members, most of them residing in the city. Even members of neighboring clubs agreed that our golf links were among the best laid-out and best maintained within reach of New York.

As more and more young people began to take up residence in the communities surrounding our property, some of our older members, not wishing to be thought of as being behind the times, opened the club to some of these new arrivals, as a matter of fact, at a considerably reduced membership fee. They hoped, I believe, for some young blood on the links and some pleasant new golfing companions. Let me chronicle in short order what we actually got.

First, the two tennis courts, long dormant through disuse, were rebuilt for wives who did not themselves play golf. In addition we made Tuesday a regular Ladies Day for golfing, but all too soon were reminded that ladies wished to accompany their husbands also on the weekends.

One of our more exuberant members offered the club a swimming pool, which was accepted by the committee, overhastily, in my opinion. The pool has become the week-round social center for the teen-age sons and daughters of our younger members, and most of us have become accustomed to being treated with the indifferent arrogance which seems to be so much a part and parcel of that unfortunate age group.

The club today has regular Saturday night dances as well as Friday night barbecues around a newly constructed outdoor grill. Some of us regret that the putting green had to be drastically shortened to provide parking space for the cars of the many new members the club has had to absorb, presumably to pay for the new parking space. I sometimes feel that I can detect more familiar faces in the waiting room of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad than I can find in the locker room of the club.

So far it has not been suggested that the golf links be flooded for water skiing by nonplaying wives and their children. But I consider this a matter of time only.

You will understand if I sign this letter with my initials only.
T. H. K.
New York City

FACTUAL AND AUTHENTIC HORRORS
Sirs:
Alice Higgins' reporting on the abominable practices by certain trainers and owners of the Tennessee Walking Horse (SI, July 23) is entirely factual and authentic. Of course, I could add a little to the list of horrors they inflict on show animals, such as the use of a wood screw in the cleft of the frog, tacks in a leather pad between shoe and hoof, and pins, old Victrola needles or the business end of a horseshoe nail in the inside of the bell boots which have been recently sanctioned for use to prevent speedy cutting or overreaching.

This piece was long overdue, and I am delighted to see it come out in a magazine of national prominence such as SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. About 1953, when I was a part-time columnist on horse matters for the Nashville Banner, and reported on local horse shows, I put several pieces in my weekly column on the subject. It got me some fan mail, mostly anonymous and abusive. One Walking Horse exhibitor, asked for an opinion on my outbursts, remarked scathingly that I was "Nothin' but one of them jumper people, tryin' to harm the Plantation Horse."
CAMPBELL H. BROWN
Nashville

NO ARGUMENTS
Sirs:
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S "Conservation and the 84th Congress" (OUTDOOR WEEK, July 16) was an excellent summary of the problems besetting conservation.

It was a distinct service to the laymen in conservation, and there can be no arguments with your "gain or loss" analysis.
JACK CONNOR
Outdoor Editor
The Minneapolis Star and The Minneapolis Tribune
Minneapolis

SPECIAL DELIVERY
Sirs:
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has so many well-written, humorous articles each week—but I especially enjoy EVENTS & DISCOVERIES, which, like other parts of the magazine, I read aloud to my family. Liked Talbert's Wimbledon article (July 16) a whole lot.
MRS. FREDERIC B. GUSTAFSON
Hampton, Va.

UNTIL THEY MEET AGAIN
Sirs:
Swaps is not the greatest thing for California since Charlie Chaplin left, as Whitney Tower said (SI, July 16). He's the greatest thing since gold was discovered.

Who can doubt now that Swaps is clearly superior over all his current rivals? His Gold Cup victory shows clearly that he is the best horse of the year. His victory was against very good competition such as Porterhouse and Mister Gus.

Meanwhile, Nashua won in unspectacular fashion against horses that don't even belong on the same track as Swaps. This fall when Swaps goes east, they'll probably meet again, with Swaps in good condition.
MORT KAMINS
Los Angeles

WHAT THIS COUNTRY NEEDS...
Sirs:
Dorothy Stull's reporting on Bonnie Prudden is exceptionally good (Be Happy, Go Healthy, July 16)....

To me the Kraus-Weber test seems highly reliable, and the longer I work with it the more respect it demands. In public school work it can be used without having to forfeit much valuable time.

What this country needs is a Bonnie Prudden in every gymnasium!
GERTRUDE SHAFFER
Johnstown, Pa.

WHITE HOUSE STABLES
Sirs:
Greatly enjoyed SPORTS ILLUSTRATED's recapitulation of that amazing personality, Andrew Jackson, as a horseman (SI, July 16). I have heard in the past that Jackson used part of the White House to quarter his racing stable—which seemed reasonable enough in those days. Just where, however, were those stables in relation to the White House as we know it today? Does anyone know? Or has this too, like so many other details of historic interest, become lost with the passing of some ancient bureaucrat?
R. WELLS SINGLEY
New York

•General Jackson's stables made up the west wing of the White House (see low building in left side of contemporary engraving above).—ED.

A POINT OF HONOR
Sirs:
I read with interest John Durant's YESTERDAY about General Jackson as a horseman. I wish to take exception to one point—that is, the duel with Charles Dickinson. This duel was fought in Kentucky because of remarks Mr. Dickinson had made regarding General Jackson's wife Rachel, alleging that their first marriage had been an improper one and that she lived for a time with him out of wedlock. I am sure that Mr. Marquis James, whom Mr. Durant quotes at frequent intervals, would have verified this. I would suspect that Mr. Durant could offer no evidence that General Jackson fought a duel over a horse race, although I have not the slightest doubt that he would have done so had he been provoked.
J. B. HOLLOWAY, M.D.
Lexington, Ky.

•The dispute over the purse forfeited when Ploughboy (owned by Mr. Dickinson's father-in-law) failed to meet General Jackson's Truxton greatly increased the bitterness which already existed between the two men. One of Jackson's friends insinuated that Mr. Dickinson and Captain Erwin, his father-in-law, were allegedly dishonorable in settling their forfeit. This matter, added to Dickinson's previous insinuations against Jackson's wife, led to such heated exchange of letters, editorials and "lyes" that both men finally were forced into a duel.—ED.

THOSE CINCY FANS
Sirs:
What is all this bunk about too many Cincinnati ballplayers appearing in the All-Star Game? All I have heard lately is that the Cincinnati fans were unfair because they cast too many ballots for Redleg ballplayers. This is unfair? Phooey! Hats off to the Cincinnati fans. It's too bad that all fans are not as enthusiastic as the Cincy fans. Why should plans be made for amending the All-Star selection process next year just because the Cincinnati fans support their players?

There should have been six Cincinnati starters in the All-Star Game. Ted Kluszewski, the best first baseman in baseball, was robbed! The Cincinnati fans deserve a pennant and the Redlegs will win it this year.
TIM NORBECK
Buffalo

DOUBLE-DUTY SLOGAN
Sirs:
Our local newspaper has a slogan, "Solid Cincinnati reads the Enquirer." The same goes for our Reds. Solid Cincinnati supports the Redlegs!
DAN L. BERGER
Cincinnati

WHY WORRY?
Sirs:
The story of the Cincinnati Redlegs could not have been told better (SI, July 16). Klu, Bell, Bailey, Post, Robinson, Temple and McMillan are really amazing when they get together.

Birdie Tebbetts is worrying about the Braves pitching staff. He should worry about that? The only thing he should worry about is Brooklyn. The Braves won't last long. I think the Redlegs are gonna do it this year, and possibly the next.

The Cincinnati Redlegs have finally done it!
INGRAM D. MARSHALL
Mount Kisco, N.Y.

THEM AND THEIR PARKS
Sirs:
Must SPORTS ILLUSTRATED continue to build up the Cincinnati home run myth as in your July 16 issue (Power Power Power!)! Really now, after half the season the Red-legs are still less than halfway to the '47 Giants' record of 221 homers, and Klu & Co., like the badly overplayed Mantle, still must face the September stretch. Look at the puny parks they play in—their own, Ebbets Field, Polo Grounds, Wrigley Field. The Redlegs may win the NL pennant, if Nuxhall gets going and Lawrence can finish a game, but not until then, their "hairy-backed sluggers" notwithstanding. Klu may have hit more homers the past years than, among others, Williams or Musial but who would really have him over those two, again among others, truly great batsmen? Not I.
GORDON ANDERSON
Dallas

A HISTORY OF RUNS PRODUCED
Sirs:
A salute to your X-RAY! Until your invention of this brief, handy chart, I have been known to wait till payday to buy the latest SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. NOW I must have the new one on the first day out. I am glad you realized that statistics are a very necessary part of baseball. You completed your fine magazine when you added this column.

My interest in unusual averages was stimulated by your "Runs Produced" section, so I spread out my well-worn record books and enjoyed compiling the tables for champions of the last 16 years and those with seasons over 300, although the latter may be incomplete. Perhaps other readers can add to the 300 list.

These tables will help to set a standard for good run production so that the records of such as Mantle the Mauler can be compared to recent history.
JOSEPH R. MILLER
Dhahran
Saudi Arabia

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PHOTOWHITE HOUSE STABLES THREE ILLUSTRATIONS© AJAYMR. CAPER

RUN-PRODUCING CHAMPIONS SINCE 1940

American League

1940

Ted Williams, Boston

279

1941

Ted Williams, Boston

255

1942

Ted Williams, Boston

278

1943

Rudy York, Detroit

208

1944

Robert Johnson, Boston

212

1945

Nick Etten, New York

188

1946

Ted Williams, Boston

265

1947

Ted Williams, Boston

239

1948

Joseph DiMaggio, New York

265

1949

Ted Williams, Boston

309

1950

Walt Dropo, Boston

245

1951

Ted Williams, Boston

235

1952

Larry Doby, Cleveland

208

1953

Al Rosen, Cleveland

260

1954

Orestes Minoso, Chicago

235

1955

Al Kaline, Detroit

223

National League

1940

John Mize, St. Louis

248

1941

Dolph Camilli, Brooklyn

212

1942

Mel Ott, New York

211

1943

Bill Nicholson, Chicago

223

1944

Bill Nicholson, Chicago

238

1945

Thomas Holmes, Boston

242

1946

Enos Slaughter, St. Louis

230

1947

John Mize, New York

275

1948

Stan Musial, St. Louis

266

1949

Stan Musial, St. Louis

251

1950

Ralph Kiner, Pittsburgh

230

1951

Ralph Kiner, Pittsburgh

215

1952

Henry Sauer, Chicago

210

1953

Edwin Snider, Brooklyn

258

1954

Edwin Snider, Brooklyn

250

1955

Edwin Snider, Brooklyn

262

RUN PRODUCTION OF 300 OR MORE IN ONE SEASON

1921

Ruth, New York (AL)

347

1931

Gehrig, New York (AL)

347

1930

Wilson, Chicago (NL)

336

1930

Klein, Philadelphia (NL)

328

1927

Gehrig, New York (AL)

324

1932

Foxx, Philadelphia (AL)

320

1937

Greenberg, Detroit (AL)

320

1936

Gehrig, New York (AL)

319

1930

Gehrig, New York (AL)

317

1930

Simmons, Philadelphia (AL)

317

1938

Foxx, Boston (AL)

314

1950

T. Williams, Boston (AL)

309

1922

Hornsby, St. Louis (NL)

293

(Note: Wilson and Klein were the only National Leaguers to make more than 300 in a single season!)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)