DIMPLE VERSUS DIMPLE

When the Women's Open Golf Tournament ended in a 302-stroke tie there was some doubt whether the new champion would be a professional (Mrs. Kathy Cornelius, left) or the first amateur ever (Barbara McIntire). But there was no doubt she would be a dimpling charmer. The pro won. For SI's account of the Open, turn to page 46

FLEET OF FOOT AND FETCHING

The ladies may not be able to run as fast and jump as far as the men but they are just as dedicated athletes—and far prettier to watch, as a glance at these Olympic hopefuls in the Western Open Championships easily proves

Marcia Cosgrove (center) leaps to victory in 50-meter dash. Only 16, Marcia went on to win 100 and 200 meters also. Others, from left, are Gayle Dierks, Gloria Griffin, Jane Ward, Jo Ann Baker.

Jean Gaertner, wearing one shoe in Ernie Shelton style, clears 4 ft. 9¼ m-in high jump to take second behind Joan May-weather. Next trial is the AAU meet in Philadelphia August 17-18.

PAMELA KURRELL, 17, FIRST IN THE BASEBALL THROW (ABOVE) WITH RECORD TOSS OF 263 FT. 1½ IN., ALSO WON DISCUS AND JAVELIN

Jane Dods tries mightily but finishes fourth in broad jump, won by 45-year-old Stella Walsh, who was our Olympic 100-meter champion in 1932.

COSSACKS ON WHEELS

Sports car racing may have picked up capitalistic overtones from Le Mans and Sebring, but that fact doesn't seem to bother the newly mechanized cossack brigade in Russia, which is gradually emerging as a challenger to the European racing supremacy of Britain, Germany and Italy. The Reds have been quietly experimenting with radical body design for the past few years, and clockings in all-Russian races indicate they are achieving respectable results. However, the Russians will not make their bid tomorrow. Their cars are scarce and have yet to show consistent performance. But one of these days, as in the Olympics, the Russians will be ready to compete in force.

THE "FLYING CROCODILE," THE BEST RACING CAR THE REDS HAVE YET PRODUCED, FLASHES TO A NEW SOVIET RECORD OF 160 MILES PER HOUR OVER A 50-KILOMETER COURSE AT SIMFEROPOL. THE UNIQUE, THREE-LITER JOB WAS HAND-BUILT BY MEMBERS OF THE KHARKOV MOTOR CLUB

Moskvich Midget, with 1,100-cc. displacement, streaks over the Simferopol course, averaging 119.3 mph.

The "Cylinder," with 2,500-cc. displacement, shows a strong resemblance to the British D Jaguar, but cannot top Jag performance yet.

Rocket-Shaped 2.12-liter Pobeda won U.S.S.R. championship circuit race held near Simferopol. It averaged 84 mph over the tough course.

Two-Seater Moskvich sports model, similar to British Austin-Healy, speeds across finish line in race near Moscow.

SEVEN PHOTOS FOUR PHOTOSJACK FIELDS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)