DREAM RACE
Sirs:
Sports Illustrated has done it again. The proposal of a dream race is a terrific idea (SI, July 30). The best horses in the country pitted against each other is really a dream race. Besides Swaps, Nashua, Needles and Fabius, how about Count of Honor. This 3-year-old colt has won all five starts this year at Hollywood Park after coming there an unraced maiden. I offer a prediction on how the race would come out if run at a mile and a half: 1) Swaps; 2) Needles; 3) Nashua; 4) Count of Honor; 5) Fabius.
MORT KAMINS
Los Angeles

DREAMING IN ATLANTIC CITY
Sirs:
We at the Atlantic City Race Course are regular readers and great admirers of the fine work SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has done in the coverage of Thoroughbred horse racing. Consequently, we read with interest your proposed "Dream Race" (E & D, July 30).

However, the Atlantic City Racing Association had the same thought several months ago when we established our two $100,000 invitational races, the Atlantic City Handicap, Aug. 11, at one mile and a furlong on the dirt track, and the United Nations Handicap, Sept. 15, at one mile and three-sixteenths on the grass course. ...The four horses you mention, Swaps, Nashua, Needles and Fabius, were all invited to participate in the Atlantic City Handicap. They will probably all again be high on the invitation list for the United Nations.

Of the four, only Nashua was in a position to accept the invitation for the Atlantic City Handicap. The others, for one reason or another, were all engaged elsewhere.... Other acceptances include Switch On, Find, Mister Gus, Porterhouse, Sea O Erin, Jet Action, Midafternoon, Skipper Bill, Thinking Cap, Wise Margin and Bardstown. I believe you will agree that these are among the most outstanding handicap horses now in training in the U.S.

Weights for the United Nations will be announced in the very near future. We don't know whether Nashua likes grass running, but we do know that, if invited, which he most certainly will be, Swaps will be here to run in the event....
JOHN B. KELLY
President
Atlantic City Racing Association
Atlantic City, N.J.

•Mr. Kelly, who has already provided the whole world with the most exciting match of the year (Rainier and Grace), is to be congratulated on providing racing fans with two fine races, but SI would still like to see ITS "dream race": Swaps, Nashua, Needles and Fabius in one field.—ED.

CAN THE PUBLIC OVERLOOK THIS?
Sirs:
Three cheers to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for the fine article Woe for Walkers (SI, July 23) by Alice Higgins. The horse world has long needed a national magazine to inform the public of some of the astonishingly cruel practices that go on at horse shows.

The Tennessee Walking Horses certainly do their share of suffering, but can we overlook the American Saddle-breds with their broken tails and heavy shoes?

Does the average person at a horse show, not a horseman, know the real story behind that pretty, alert, high-tailed, high-stepping animal before him in the show ring? Does he know of the tail-cutting, the standing 10 months or more with the tail in an immobile brace each year of showing, the disgusting practice of gingering?

Many of the top horse show people themselves condemn these unnatural practices, but it will take an educated public to completely outlaw them.
DIANE L. GUILDFORD
North Olmsted, Ohio

TOWARD A SPEEDY END
Sirs:
Mrs. Tyler and I admire you for your article on the Tennessee Walking Horse. We hope the cruel practices on Walking Horses may now come to an end and we think your article will help a lot.
CAL G. TYLER
Dixon, Ill.

THE EFFECTIVE WEAPON
Sirs:
I am sure SPORTS ILLUSTRATED readers would be interested in the reaction here in Tennessee to its charge of inhuman treatment of the Tennessee Walking Horse.

As part of an article for The Nashville Banner, I interviewed several trainers, owners and officials. They agreed that there is a practice of cruelty on the part of some trainers, but that progress is being made to stamp this out. Orman Gilmore, a judge, said, for example: "Some of the treatment these horses are getting is a disgrace."

The president of the Breeders Association, H. Tom Fulton, in discussing cruelty to these animals, told me: "It is serious. It may or may not be getting worse, but I do know that our association is starting to take steps toward cleaning it up."

The association has indeed named a special committee of three of its executive committee members to discuss with state officials a law similar to that which protects Walkers in Kentucky. This, of course, follows SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S suggestion.

The Nashville Humane Association has been quietly investigating reports of cruelty for over a year without being able to nail down positive evidence or prove guilt. SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S article has provided the publicity that is the most effective weapon in matters of this nature and has stirred the proper people into action.
BOB WITT
The Nashville Banner
Nashville, Tenn.

INCURABLE COMPLACENCY
Sirs:
Robert Creamer is obviously a Yankee fan (Casey Puts It on Ice, July 23) who has forgotten that the game is never over until the last man is out. History shows many come-from-behind pennant winners—viz. 1951 Giants, 1914 Braves. The Yankees have been known to lose a few—and they can do it again. Ask Stengel! He's not so confident and he should know.
VIRGINIA PEIRCE
Santa Barbara, Calif.

YANKEE BOYCOTT
Sirs:
Sadly I will have to agree with SPORTS ILLUSTRATED that the Yankees for all practical purposes have clinched the 1956 American League pennant. But I am disgusted about it because I see an unhealthy situation in the American League. Poor Chicago hasn't won an American League pennant since 1919, and Detroit for 11 years.

The only solution is for the other seven clubs to completely boycott the Yanks—make no deals at all with them.
ROGER STANTON
Detroit

SURPRISE, SURPRISE
Sirs:
Boy, is that Creamer going to be surprised in September when he looks at the box score and sees that Boston has won the pennant.
LES DABEK
Manchester, N.H.

•That Creamer says: "Boy, will I!"—ED.

SOLID CINCINNATI
Sirs:
Your picture of the ecstatic Cincinnati fans with their All-Star pennant (WONDERFUL WORLD, July 23) just isn't fair. Even their female fans have more muscles than our Pirate ballplayers. Or was that Ted Kluszewski in a blond wig?
MARTHA TUNSTALL
Pittsburgh

FIT IN PHOENIX
Sirs:
I enjoy all of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, but I particularly want to compliment you on your attention to women's sports activities.

One way to get youngsters interested in exercises and physical fitness is to get their mothers interested. YWCA health education departments have for years been doing, just this, but with more support from their communities, better facilities and more and better instructors they could do a much bigger and better job.

We are fortunate here in Phoenix in that the local Tennis Patrons Association has undertaken the project of raising money to build two tennis courts. We are looking for other sports-minded groups and individuals to help finance a big swimming pool, a gymnasium, outdoor exercise area and children's playground.
MRS. EDWARD E. TUFTE
Phoenix

HE CAN DO IT
Sirs:
The article by Coles Phinizy on Rafer Johnson (Another Giant from the Valley, July 16) was a superbly done job. It gave me a clear picture of Rafer's ability and possibilities of his winning the decathlon for us. I myself believe that he can do it. Mr. Phinizy is to be commended for his excellent handling of a great athlete's chances.
PETER ROUSSEL
Houston

A CHANGE OF HEART
Sirs:
I was sorry to see that Governor Earl Long of Louisiana has signed a state bill banning interracial athletic contests in his commonwealth ("Current Week," July 30). This, of course, was his privilege but, in a country such as ours and especially in the field of sports where we like to give everyone an equal opportunity, it does seem to be a step in the wrong direction.

I have been interested in sports for more than 40 years and have been active in a number of national sports organizations. We have constantly been moving in the direction of brotherhood and equality.

I hope that sportsmen of Louisiana will examine the new law and, if it really says and means what has been reported, will have it in their hearts to bring about a change through thoughtful and legal means.
H. T. FRIERMOOD
National Council of YMCA
New York

THE GOLDEN AGE OF UNCLE MARTIN
Sirs:
Edwin M. Stone's letter (July 23) went down memory lane with his story of the children's game called the Prince of Paris. How well I recall the game—going back to the 1900s—excepting that it was called here the "Priest of the Parish." The cap he lost was his "considering" cap. Also the first to be accused was "my man Jack." He was to reply, "Oh, not I sir." Then the game would proceed.

In those days, in the golden age of simplicity, people had to make their own fun. In the Priest of the Parish game, my Uncle Martin, of happy memory, always sat in the middle. Encircling him were the maiden ladies, and he held the only weapon, a large boxing glove which he kept waving around during the progress of the game. He would hold the glove at the wrist and clobber them with the soft part of the glove when they missed. I'm sure the hysterical laughter and shrieks of the girls could have been heard a block away.

I think Uncle Martin was a showman in excluding males—there wouldn't have been half the commotion.
THOMAS O'MALLEY
Philadelphia

DREAM BOATS (CONT.)
Sirs:
Lou Marron's deep-sea fishing cruiser is certainly a dream boat (SI, July 30), but it is not the only one afloat. Here is another, the Lazy Bones III (see diagram), which we just finished for Harry Peters of Hackensack, N.J. Here the emphasis is on a highspeed boat of medium range and maximum maneuverability. Lou Marron's Eugenie VIII is a long-range boat, and it is not yet possible to build everything into one boat without sacrificing something.

Now for the details: length—40 feet, beam—13 feet 4 inches, speed—30 mph with twin 250-hp V-8 Chrysler engines. Unlike Eugenie, the Rybovich-designed hull features a very deep Vee bottom which has proven to be ideal. These boats can be driven at high speed in very rough water, and with their low profile, good beam and Vee bottom you have a boat that gives the utmost in comfort even under the nastiest sea conditions. A 425-gallon-gasoline capacity gives the extra range needed to reach the hard-to-get-to places. For maximum speed and maneuverability, we have found that for this design gasoline engines are best, and the Chrysler V-8 certainly has proven itself in the past two years.

The cockpit (see diagram) is the center of the activity on any fish boat, and here we were able to give the space needed by eliminating all projections with recessed cleats and rod holders, fighting chair with rod holders on each arm of chair, which double as hand grips. A live-bait well under deck also serves as a fish box when the large box is left ashore. A bait icebox is at starboard.

The lower control station (see diagram) is located near the chair so the entire crew can be handy to the angler when it comes time to take a big fish. After much experimentation, we have pretty much settled on the transom door (see diagram) as the ideal method of getting a fish on board.

The lounge in the deckhouse (see diagram) has worked out well, the pedestal-mounted table makes it easy to get out from under in a hurry. Rod lockers at right keep tackle in order.

The flying bridge control station is a duplicate of the lower station. A depth recorder, remote control for 85-watt radio and radio direction finder make this the navigating station, and with the one-piece windshield there is ample protection.

The tower—hereabouts, we call them tuna towers, as they were developed by us for use at the Cat Cay Tuna Tournament, is a light-weight aluminum framework having a platform and padded railing with a control station that puts a man 20 feet above the water and in a position to add tremendously to his effective range of observation as well as be able to see down into the water. The ladder leading directly to the bridge assures a safe and quick return to a control position closer to the angler after the fish is hooked. The tower should work out well in looking for broadbill at Montauk this summer.

Accommodations are not extensive; many a good fishing trip has been ruined by having too many people on board. We have provided a private stateroom for two, with adjoining bath. Crew's quarters for two and separate head. Ample galley and galley refrigeration, 150-gallon water tank plus a 15-gallon tank for drinking water piped through a cooler in the refrigerator.

The forward cabin is air-conditioned. In addition to cooling, the most important feature is the filtered air provided in air-conditioning, and in some parts of the Bahamas, this insures freedom from insects, which, at times, are very bad.

The above, along with the sketches, provides some information of one other owner's ideas about a "dream" fishing boat.
JOHN RYBOVICH JR.
West Palm Beach

•John Rybovich is responsible for the design and construction of some of the most versatile sport fishermen afloat as well as such specialized equipment as the Rybovich outriggers, used also on Lou Marron's Eugenie VIII.—ED.

SOLE SOURCE
Sirs:
Out here in Manhattan (Kans.) we're grateful to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for keeping us posted on Princeton University's 150-pound rowing crew.

I have one objection, I found no mention of the coach Donald L. Rose. Although he's in his first year of coaching at Princeton U., he's quite a sportsman. Not only was he coxswain on the rowing crew at Wisconsin U. but was also a varsity gymnast, and later sports editor for a Wisconsin daily.
LOIS M. OTTAWAY
Manhattan, Kans.

•See above for Coach Don Rose (right, kneeling) and his crew, who are, left to right (standing): James Newcomer, Portland, Ore.; William Satterfield, Little Rock, Ark.; Robert Brink, San Jose, Calif.; Anthony Fletcher, New Canaan, Conn.; Alan Korhammer, Mt. Vernon, N.Y.; Leonard Yerkes, Wilmington, Del.; Raymond Huttig, Homewood, Ill.; James Kaiser, Anchorage, Ky. (Kneeling): John Soutter, Rye, N.Y.; David Schall, Cleveland; Peter Liebert, Brooklyn.—ED.

ILLUSTRATION"Now that we know about your skill with the bow and arrow, may we remove it?" PHOTO ILLUSTRATION"LAZY BONES III" HAS PULPIT. TUNA TOWER COULD BE RIGGED FOR REMOTE STEERING ILLUSTRATIONCOCKPIT BOASTS RECESSED HARDWARE ILLUSTRATIONLOUNGE-CONTROLS DUPLICATE BRIDGE'S
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)