19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

August 12, 1956

DREAM RACE (CONT.)
Sirs:
I am in accord with your suggestion for a Dream Race (SI, July 30) if only to prove "the error of their ways" to those poor misguided "turf experts" who last year voted Nashua Horse of the Year.

However, you have ignored the only horse in training today who might possibly stay close enough to Swaps to make a horse race out of it—Count of Honor, an unbeaten 3-year-old son of Count Fleet.

Now to Nashua. You make the statement both Swaps and Nashua are greater this year than last. Swaps, yes, but not the eastern horse. Just what is the measuring rod for equine greatness? Is it money won? Nashua's record this year certainly indicates anything but greatness. He has yet to win under 130 pounds and has twice run out of the money against good, but certainly not great, competition.

Nashua failed to do what every really great 3-year-old was able to do: beat older horses of quality at weight for age. All the great ones-Swaps, Citation, Native Dancer, etc.—did it. Actually Nashua is no better than third at best behind Swaps and Mister Gus with Count of Honor probably a better horse also on a weight for age basis.
FRED NEIL
Santa Monica, Calif.

•For the latest on the still possible dream race, see Events & Discoveries.—ED.

HONESTY AND DIGNITY
Sirs:
Regarding A Manager and His Fighter (SI, July 30)...I do not doubt that Writer Boyle saw the situation as he reports it, and perhaps that is the way it is in some cases, but it is no typical manager-fighter relationship.

I boxed for the Sid Flaherty stable (Carl "Bobo" Olson, Eddie Machen and others) in San Francisco during 1946 and '47. Sid Flaherty, for instance, does not look upon his stable of fighters as a "bunch of bums," and they respect him because he respects-them. In all fairness, you should do a follow-up article on a manager of Sid Flaherty's caliber, who has given the fight game not only honesty but dignity.
BILLY WILSON
Seattle

•"A manager of Sid Flaherty's caliber," Sid himself-despite his genuine paternalism-may very likely lose his manager's license as a result of the California boxing investigations (SI, May 7).—ED.

FACTUAL GLIMPSE
Sirs:
...It is the best picture of the boxing business I have read. It is not just an expose, but a real factual glimpse into the boxing world.
JIMMY DOLEN
Producer
Sports Mirror, CBS
New York City

STRICTLY ON THE LEVEL
Sirs:
I have read your article and it is very apparent that you are trying to give boxing a black eye....

When you state that a boy is not smart when he says he wants to be a fighter, is extremely absurd. How about such boys as Carmen Basilio, Danny Giovanelli, Chuck Spieser, Al Andrews, Lulu Perez.... These boys could not be called bums by any stretch of the imagination and they certainly would have nothing to do with a manager who was not strictly on the level.
EDWARD McPHERSON
Syracuse, N.Y.

•A bum in fight talk is an opponent- an opponent a manager feels his fighter can beat without much exertion.—ED.

JUDGING THE JUDGE
Sirs:
Some eastern boxing experts are still clinging tenaciously to their belief that Basilio whipped Saxton in Chicago, as evidenced by your July 30 (Events & Discoveries) comments about Fight Judge Ed Hintz. Though neither man is Hall of Fame material, it was pretty well agreed among local Chicago experts that Saxton deserved to w.n. The most vocal critic of the IBC, Jack Mabley of the Chicago Daily News, agreed the verdict was just.

Hintz's reputation here is still such that no important figure has accused him of being dishonest. Most "sporting people" and other observers here agree with Hintz that he used bad judgment in becoming involved with Hodge, but don't think he made, or had any intention of making, a dime on the Hodge haul. Hintz and his lifelong love of boxing are a thing quite apart from the Banker Hintz-Auditor Hodge matter. Perhaps this is a fine distinction, but I think you'll grasp it after a little more consideration.
AUBREY O. COOKMAN JR.
Chicago

•What we do grasp is that bad judgment does not a successful boxing judge or banker make.—ED.

POETRY AT BAT
Sirs:
My husband receives your magazine and I enjoy it also. I especially like the short poem in Events & Discoveries each week. I've written one which I thought you might enjoy:

THE ROOKIE
Back to the minors now, no doubt
He sacrificed with two men out!
JACQUELINE SPECKER
Marquette, Mich.

•No minor leaguer, Mrs. Specker, She hit a homer, upper decker.
—ED.

APPROPRIATE RECOGNITION HEREWITH
Sirs:
Your recent "Pats on the Back" to college tennis coaches were well deserved. I wonder if a small bow in the direction of Coach J. Emmett Pare, tennis coach at Tulane University, is not also in order.

No one can approach Coach Pare's record of having produced six National Collegiate singles champions -Ernest Sutter (1936-37), Jack Tuero (1949), Hamilton Richardson (1953-54) and Jose Aguero (1955).

In his 20 years as coach at Tulane, his teams have won 14 Southeastern Conference championships and have won 152 dual meets, against 25 defeats and 11 ties.

His present pupils include Aguero, the new Southern amateur champion; Ronald Holmberg, the 1956 Wimbledon junior champion and 1955 U.S. National junior indoor champion; and Crawford Henry, National Interscholastic champion.

At the age of 48, Coach Pare still plays on better than even terms with all of these young men. A member of the first Tilden professional tour in 1931 and two years later National Professional doubles champion with Bruce Barnes, Pare was previously Western amateur and National Clay Courts champion.

This marks his 25th anniversary as a professional and I feel that recognition by your outstanding publication would be quite appropriate.
EDISON ALLEN
New Orleans

HAPPY, HAPPY
Sirs:
Enjoyed Be Happy, Go Healthy With Bonnie (SI, July 16) no end. Indeed making people feel happy while exercising is quite an accomplishment....
CAROL GREENLAND
White Plains, N.Y.

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF FITNESS
Sirs:
I have read with much interest your article Conference at Annapolis: First Blow for Fitness (SI, July 2).

I would like to obtain the complete text of the Kraus-Weber test (The Report that Shocked the President, SI, Aug. 15, 1955).

I am interested in keeping abreast of the progress of the proposed council on fitness because I hope to do research in the area of physiology of exercise which may be applied to physical fitness.
WILLIAM N. WASSON
Professor of Physical Education
Grambling College
Grambling, La.

•The original report of the Kraus-Weber test is found in the New York State Journal of Medicine, Vol. 54, No. 2, Jan. 15, 1954, "Muscular Fitness and Orthopedic Disability."—ED.

BASIC EXERCISES
Sirs:
I should like to have a copy of Bonnie Prudden's booklet on exercises mentioned in your article.
MRS. B. MAGNUSON
Chalfont, Pa.

•Miss Prudden's book, Basic Exercises No. 1, is available from the Institute for Physical Fitness, 5 Hillside Ave., White Plains, N.Y. Cost is $2.—ED.

A SMALL REQUEST
Sirs:
I would very much appreciate it if you would send me six copies of the reprint of the article on physical fitness by Bonnie Prudden.
JOHN W. BARTLEY
Director of Physical Education
YMCA, Downtown Branch
Dallas

•Due to the great demand by individuals and groups working in this field, Sports Illustrated is making available copies of its article on Bonnie Prudden's program and its earlier report on Dr. Kraus' detailed study of physical fitness in American and European children.—ED.

PUBLIC COOPERATION
Sirs:
Colorado veterinarians and other citizens of this cool, colorful state are avid readers of your magazine and we enjoy our discussions on your varied articles.

We are dismayed, however, at the reflection that is cast on our profession by your remarks in Woe for Walkers where you refer to the "veterinarian, with unswerving dedication to the collection of the fast buck...." We admit that a few of our colleagues may have a tendency to place their ambitions over their ethics, but as we catch them, we do our best to "weed 'em out."

If Alice Higgins or any reader finds such a veterinarian as you describe, the local or state veterinary association should be contacted, and you will find their ethics committees handle these affairs with dispatch.

We are a proud profession, and that pride is based on our ability to maintain high standards. We ask the public cooperation in instances such as this.
G. H. GILBERT
Secretary-Treasurer
Colorado Veterinary Medical Assn.
Arvada, Colo.

THIS BOTHERS ME
Sirs:
Jeremiah Tax in Harry the Horrid (SI, July 23) says of Adios Harry: "Shattered, incidentally, is the only word for what Harry did to the mile racing record. It was 1:57 4/5 when he went up to Vernon and 1:55 when he left."

This bothers me terribly and I would appreciate an explanation. I have been under the impression all my life that Dan Patch paced the mile, years before the turn of the century, in 1:55 1/4....
WILLIAM DON WILLIAMS
San Jacinto, Calif.

•Dan Patch set his mark in a time trial, which is in no way comparable to racing competition. A time trial is a race under ideal conditions between a horse and the clock, with none of the battling for position and imposed strategy involved in an eight- or 10-horse race field. The U.S. Trotting Association still keeps trial records to enable owners to set a value on their horses for future breeding purposes. As a race horse, Adios Harry is the fastest standard-bred in the sport's 150-year history.—ED.

KING-SIZE DIVE
Sirs:
Ron E. Church and two friends were diving off Los Coronados Island about 30 miles southwest of San Diego off the Mexican coast last Saturday when Church spotted a king-size bass (see cut) swimming slowly against the current at about 35-foot depth. He finned to within about four feet of the brute, let him have it in the left gill with a four-foot spear fired from a rubber-spring gun. For a few minutes the bass seemed unaware that he had been hurt, continuing to swim slowly in lazy zigzags. Then he took off, with Church hanging on to a 60-foot line. Without breathing equipment, Church was forced to surface every minute or so, tracked the bass's movements with the aid of a "Mae West" he had attached to line. After 45 minutes and a 500-yard chase, surfacing and returning, trying to bring the bass up, Church finally surfaced with the fish.

It weighed in at 464½ pounds—for skin divers, a world record.
BOB NICHOLS
San Diego

PHOTOCOACH EMMETT PARE PHOTORON CHURCH AND GIANT SEA BASS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)