Sept. 03, 1956
Sept. 03, 1956

Table of Contents
Sept. 3, 1956

Forest Hills
Events & Discoveries
The Wonderful World Of Sport
The Giants
Part Two
Horse Racing
The Outdoor Week
Bernard Darwin
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Mr. Caper



This is an article from the Sept. 3, 1956 issue Original Layout

Lorraine Crapp, 17-year-old Australian naiad, diligently whippeted back and forth across 55-yard fresh-water pool at Townsville to break four world freestyle records in same night: 400 meters in 4:50.8; 440 yards in 4:52.4; 200 meters in 2:19.3; 220 yards in 2:20.5 (Aug. 25). Other swimming record breakers: Holland's Jan Koster, who churned 1,500 meters in 20:22.8 at Utrecht (Aug. 21); Toronto's Ginny Grant, who stroked 100-yard freestyle in :58.6 at Toronto (Aug. 21).

New Zealander Bobby Burns teamed up with countryman Russell Wright (in attached sidecar), roared his motorcycle over Bonneville Salt Flats at two-way average speed of 176.42 mph for measured mile to set world speed record (Aug. 21).

Elizabeth Dunskay-Krzesinsia, 16-year-old Polish schoolgirl, leaped 20 feet 10 inches at Budapest to break world broad jump standard (Aug. 20).


Milwaukee Braves successfully met challenge of top National League contenders, smacking down Cincinnati, splitting with Brooklyn to hold two-game edge over Dodgers, four over Redlegs at week's end.

New York dawdled along in American League, losing three out of four to Chicago and splitting pair with Detroit as Mickey Mantle came out of slump to boost home run total to 44, but so did second-place Cleveland, who could get no better than even split in six games with New York, Boston and Washington, leaving Yankees 7½ games ahead of field.

Bill Waggoner's Shanty I, with Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Russell Schleeh at helm, bounced over Detroit River to beat Canadian challenger Miss Supertest II by 2½ miles in first heat of Harmsworth Trophy race. Monday, after setting record in first lap, Shanty I had mishap, required tow, lost to rival, set stage for third and deciding heat.

Joe Brown, 30-year-old journeyman boxer, broke his right hand on Wallace (Bud) Smith's china chin in second round, then skittered and left-jabbed until 14th, when he gambled with aching fist long enough to knock down inept lightweight champion twice, went on to take split decision and title at New Orleans.


Sara Barber, 15-year-old from Brantford, Ont. called "potentially the greatest swimmer this country has ever had" by Coach Tommy Walker, churned up record-breaking swell in Canadian Olympic trials at Toronto's Willowvale Park, splashed off with five titles (100-yard butterfly, 200-yard individual medley, 100-yard backstroke, 100-yard freestyle, 440-yard freestyle), set national marks in four events.

Marilyn Bell, chunky 18-year-old Torontonian, responded dutifully to plea of wily Coach Gus Ryder, who implored, "swim home to Canada, Marilyn," conquered tide-treacherous 18.3-mile Strait of Juan de Fuca between Port Angeles, Wash, and Victoria, B.C., in record time of 10:39.

U.S. Davis Cup hopes received another jolt when Australia's Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall skillfully combined booming service and neat placements to overpower Vic Seixas and Ham Richardson in four sets for U.S. doubles title at Brookline, Mass. Louise Brough and Mrs. Margaret Osborne duPont, perennial champions, won for 11th time, breezing past Shirley Fry and Betty Rosenquest Pratt 6-3, 6-0 in women's final.


Hungary's Istvan Rozsavolgyi became 10th man to crack 4-minute barrier, running mile in 3:59 at Budapest.

Jim Hewson of Buffalo, Henry Laskau and Bruce McDonald of New York trailed Canada's Alex Oakley across finish line in national 20-kilometer walking championship at Pittsburgh but qualified for U.S. Olympic team.


MARRIED—Archie Moore, gracefully aging (39 going on 42) light heavyweight champion and No. 1 contender for vacant heavyweight title; and Joan Hardy, 24, attractive New York model; at Ensenada, Mexico.

DIED—Sam (Golf Bag) Hunt, 55, Chicago gangster and gambler with more than casual interest in horses and boxing, onetime triggerman (he got his nickname for quaint manner of carrying golf bag with submachine gun nestled inside) for Hoodlum Al Capone, friend and ofttime companion of IBC President James D. Norris ("Hunt has always been 100% with me...always a gentleman and good company"); of pneumonia and heart disease, at Schenectady.