THE ELEVEN BEST ELEVENS

September 23, 1956

Football's soothsayer, having just finished his annual pilgrimage to the shrines of the sport, here delivers his prognostications on what the 1956 season promises and his scouting reports on the 11 teams most likely to succeed. He follows these with his diagnoses of the 12 major conferences and the principal independents, to which SPORTS ILLUSTRATED appends additional scouting reports assembled by its correspondents across the country on 111 other teams which are most likely to occupy the fans' attention. They are grouped according to their 1955 standings in their 12 separate conferences, with an added section on the 21 independents, listed in alphabetical order.

Since its inception football has been a game of cycles and styles. Football coaches and fair ladies alike are sheep as far as the latest mode chic is concerned. The newest creations from such famous salons as Dior-Wilkinson at Norman, Okla. and Cassini-Munn at East Lansing, Mich.—the latter now under the active direction of an up-and-coming young Irishman named Duffy Daugherty, whose latest creation carried away all the honors at the Rose Bowl Festival at Pasadena—are studied, copied and adopted by coaches throughout the country. In fact, the widespread acceptance of the Norman split-T design clothed football 1955 with a factory-made look that at times bordered on the monotonous.

Having just returned from a tour of the principal style centers, I wish to predict a new trend for the fall of 1956. Nothing radical, mind you, but the wave of conservatism which has engulfed college football, and has even been felt in the professional game these past few seasons, is beginning to end. For instance, from the staid house at Norman come such catch phrases as "unbalanced line added," "a passing spread," "addition of 'belly series,' " etc. The doctrine of control football with mottoes like "a first down in three downs" and "they can't score if they don't have the ball" will be challenged. Last fall's powerful practitioners of this doctrine—Ohio State, Miami, Georgia Tech, Army and others-may be forced by "packed defenses" to go to the air. In fact, its outstanding exponents say that there is nothing so futile as a split-T team, two touchdowns behind, still grinding out first downs as fickle time flies.

Another trend of the times will be the use of the two-team system more than ever before. Most coaches have come to realize that a combination of fresh players participating alternately every seven or eight minutes is much stronger over the 60-minute route than a single unit of the 11 best men going the distance. To my way of thinking this is "two-platoon" football at its best, with every participant playing both offense and defense and not indulging in the spectacle of the specialists of a few years ago.

Football '56 has come a far distance from the days of the early-season breathers. Gone forever—and good riddance, I say—is the practice of scheduling setups in September and on into the second week of October. Many important games are on the books for the weekend of September 22 (not, however, among the Big Ten and Ivy schools, which do not swing into action until the 29th). Here are just a few "mid-November classics" to be played that first weekend: West Virginia-Pittsburgh, Syracuse-Maryland, SMU-Notre Dame, Kentucky-Georgia Tech, California-Baylor, Mississippi State-Florida and Texas-USC.

In selecting my 11 elevens for 1956, I found that the vagaries in Pacific Coast football made any evaluation there impossible. Certainly before the ineligibility penalties were imposed, either USC or UCLA, possibly both, would have been selected. Stanford may deserve this ranking, but, due to the uncertain caliber of Coast football, the Indians were not included. Their national ranking, however, will be established early in games with Michigan State and Ohio State on successive Saturdays. As for the Big Ten, the Fighting Illini, fortified with the fleetest runners extant, may make me wish that I had never heard of Michigan, Michigan State and Ohio State before the season is over.

Powerful Pittsburgh is generally regarded as the best in the East and a threat for the national title. The Panthers play four of my selections—Duke, Notre Dame, Army and Miami. If they win these four they deserve the undisputed national championship.

Jim Tatum left Tommy Mont loaded with seasoned lettermen and the best tackle squad in the country at Maryland. Last year I selected Maryland but in 1956, despite dire forebodings by "Preacher" Bill Murray at Duke, I am picking the Blue Devils to finish a notch above them.

My selection of Miami may lift some eyebrows. The Hurricanes are the forgotten men of 1956 after all the experts (excepting Hickman) rode the bandwagon last season. They lost three heartbreakers last year to Georgia Tech, Notre Dame and Texas Christian. The best three-time losers in college football will have ample opportunity to justify my rating them in the 11 elevens this season.

Mississippi may again win the SEC championship and possibly have an undefeated season, but—through no fault of their own, except possibly being too strong—they again do not have a representative schedule. Tennessee will be tough, but seven rugged opponents in a row may soften their sophomores.

According to Bear Bryant the selection of his "pore little Aggies" on my 11 elevens was a horrendous mistake, and many down Texas way agree with him that Texas Christian and only Texas Christian is the cream of the crop. I may be wrong about the best team in the Southwest, but I'm sticking with Texas A&M until so proven.

Just one thing is certain. King Football, exiled for a couple of more weeks, perhaps, in New York, Brooklyn, Cincinnati and Milwaukee, is back bigger and better than ever for his autumnal reign. So a fig to all the prognosticators including Old Herman. Let the ball bounce as crazy as ever, be it rubber or pigskin. Let the girls be prettier and the bands play louder. Here coming on the field are my 11 best elevens for 1956. May the best teams win.

ARMY
WEST POINT, N.Y.

COLORS: Gold and gray.

BASIC OFFENSE: T, balanced line.

1955 RECORD: Won 6, lost 3.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15 of 24.

WATCH FOR: Stan Slater, G; Flay Goodwin, T; Ed Szvetecz, C; Bob Kyasky, B.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Harry Walters, B; Bill Rowe, G; Gene Mikelonis, B.

COACH RED BLAIK SAYS: On the positive side we have more depth at most positions than we had last year. On the negative side we are hampered once again by inexperience at quarterback, and we are shorthanded at end. As for the schedule, both Syracuse and Michigan appear stronger, and we lost to both last year. Pitt has one of the finest squads in the country and Navy is again a ranking power.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: The great experiment goes on again this year on the plains above the Hudson. Bob Kyasky, oft-injured halfback, has been switched to quarterback to fill the shoes of departed Don Holleder, the great experiment of 1955. If this move is as successful as last year's—a victory over Navy is the one and only criterion of success to Colonel Blaik—everyone will be happy at West Point. Four veteran backs, tried and true, return in Dick Murtland, Joe Cygler, Vince Barta and Tony Munger. But the big excitement is two sophomore backs, Gene Mikelonis and Harry Walters. Six starters return to the line, second only to Maryland last year in rushing defense and first in the nation in total defense. From all indications—and, of course, always barring key injuries—this may be the best Army team in several years.

1955 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 29—VMI (no game)
Oct. 6—Penn State (35-6)
Oct. 13—at Michigan (2-26)
Oct. 20—at Syracuse (0-13)
Oct. 27—at Columbia (45-0)
Nov. 3—Colgate (27-7)
Nov. 10—William & Mary (no game)
Nov. 17—at Pittsburgh (no game)
Dec. 1—Navy at Philadelphia (14-6)

DUKE
DURHAM, N.C.

COLORS: Blue and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: Split T.

1955 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2, tied 1.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22 of 35.

WATCH FOR: Sonny Jurgensen, B; Buddy Bass, E; Sidney Deloatch, T; Harold McElhaney, B; Roy Hord, G.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Bob Brodhead, B; Wade Byrd, C.

COACH BILL MURRAY SAYS: Our team is made up almost entirely of last year's reserves, with some help from sophomores. We must depend on added maturity (in a football sense), unusual team spirit and self-discipline. We have had some bad breaks since practice opened. Buddy Bass has been hospitalized since practice started with a bad throat. Eddie Rushton, who we were counting on to replace Bob Pascal, is out due to a leg injury. I repeat that we must depend on added maturity, team spirit and self-discipline for any success.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: I may be wrong in selecting the Blue Devils as one of my "Eleven Best Elevens," especially if I would dare to listen to the incantations of "Preacher" Bill Murray. Sonny Jurgensen is, in my opinion, the best split-T operator in the country. He has a brilliant sophomore replacement coming on in the person of Bob Brodhead. Harold McElhaney is a pounding fullback with speed to go outside. The line will need some replacements, but Duke has the hard core of an always tough Duke forward wall. Bill Murray has winning ways, and this year will be no exception. First serious test should be with Tennessee at Durham on Oct. 6.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 22—at South Carolina (41-7)
Sept. 29—at Virginia (no game)
Oct. 6—Tennessee (21-0)
Oct. 13—Southern Methodist (no game)
Oct. 20—Pittsburgh at Norfolk (7-26)
Oct. 27—N.C. State (33-7)
Nov. 3—Georgia Tech (0-27)
Nov. 10—Navy (7-7)
Nov. 17—at Wake Forest (14-0)
Nov. 24—at North Carolina (6-0)

GEORGIA TECH
ATLANTA, GA.

COLORS: Gold and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: Spread T.

1955 RECORD: Won 8, lost 1, tied 1. Sugar Bowl: defeated Pittsburgh 7-0.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 27 of 43.

WATCH FOR: George Volkert, B; Wade Mitchell, B; Paul Rotenberry, B.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Eddie Elward, C; Dave Robison, C.

COACH BOBBY DODD SAYS: We have no expectations of going undefeated this year, but we will have a good team. Our backs will be unusually good in quality and depth, our line should be average but we are weak in depth at center and guard.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: Only three players are missing from the two starling teams of a year ago which lost only to Auburn by two points and defeated Pittsburgh in the Sugar Bowl. The senior starting backfield of Wade Mitchell, George Volkert and Paul Rotenberry, and Ken Owen, is without peer in the South. Toppy Vann, another senior quarterback, may supplant Mitchell for the nationally televised opener with Kentucky on Sept. 22. Mitchell suffered a shoulder dislocation recently and may not be ready. Vann is as smooth an operator as Mitchell but cannot match his defensive play. The trickster tactics and "throw the ball anywhere" slogan of earlier Dodd productions have given way to more conservative style of play. The passers are capable, but Dodd says: "Why sacrifice a possible touchdown run by Volkert or Rotenberry, and risk the loss of the ball by throwing it?" This veteran squad should take sectional and national honors.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 22—at Kentucky (no game)
Sept 29—at SMU, N (20-7)
Oct. 13—Louisiana State (7-0)
Oct. 20—Auburn (12-14)
Oct. 27—Tulane (no game)
Nov. 3—at Duke (27-0)
Nov. 10—Tennessee (7-7)
Nov. 17—Alabama (26-2)
Nov. 24—Fla. at Jacksonville (14-7)
Dec. 1—at Georgia (21-3)

MIAMI
CORAL GABLES, FLA.

COLORS: Orange, green and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: Miami drive series.

1955 RECORD: Won 6, lost 3.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16 of 27.

WATCH FOR: Don Bosseler, B; Tom Pratt, G; Sam Scarnecchia, B; John Varone, B.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATE: Claude Casey, B.

COACH ANDY GUSTAFSON SAYS: Our 1956 football team could be one of the best that we have had since I came here in 1948. Although we lost eight men who started our last game of 1955, I believe that the upcoming freshmen will supplement last year's second team with enough good personnel to give us a stronger, faster squad. We plan to make more use of the running-type action pass and run from the unbalanced line along with our regular balanced-line T formation.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: Not overrated but overscheduled sums up the tough Hurricanes of 1955. I expect this year's edition to be much improved, and, with the schedule slightly softened, a more successful season is in the offing. Andy Gustafson believes Don Bosseler, his fullback, to be one of the outstanding players he has ever coached. Incidentally, Andy was the back-field coach at West Point in the Davis-Blanchard era. Quarterback trouble beset Miami from the start last year, but Sam Scarnecchia has solved that problem. A possible all-senior line highlights Tom Pratt, linebacking guard, Mike Hudock, center, and Don Johnson at end. Miami will not be a flashy team. They are ground-minded, complemented by an outstanding defense.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 28—South Carolina, N (no game)
Oct. 5—Boston College, N (14-7)
Oct. 12—Maryland, N (no game)
Oct. 19—Georgia, N (no game)
Oct. 27—at Texas Christian, N (19-21)
Nov. 2—Florida State, N (34-0)
Nov. 16—Clemson, N (no game)
Nov. 23—West Virginia, N (no game)
Dec. 1—at Florida (7-6)
Dec. 8—Pittsburgh (21-7)

MICHIGAN STATE
EAST LANSING, MICH.

COLORS: Green and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple offense.

1955 RECORD: Won 8, lost 1.
Rose Bowl: defeated UCLA 17-14.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 25 of 38.

WATCH FOR: Clarence Peaks, B; Walt Kowalczyk, B; Dan Currie, G; John Matsko, C.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Francis O'Brien, T; Don Arend, B; Ellison Kelly, G.

COACH DUFFY DAUGHERTY SAYS: If we stay physically whole and get our share of breaks, I look for this team to produce a very creditable record. We have good speed, satisfactory depth at most positions and fine spirit. There is better size, too, especially among the sophomores.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: The Spartans were the most impressive team physically I've seen this fall. The unbelievably large (210 pounds each) duo at halfback, Clarence Peaks and Walt Kowalczyk, backed by ample reserve strength makes this potentially the finest backfield in America. The only question mark is at quarterback where the graduated Earl Morrall held forth. Captain John Matsko at center leads a plethoric group of linemen, including such proved performers as Guard Dan Currie and Rose Bowl Hero Dave Kaiser at end. Coach Duffy Daugherty has added many new wrinkles to the multiple offense. He will hit the quick opening dive bucks from a single wing formation in the back-field and a split-T alignment up front. Conversely, he will run Peaks and Kowalczyk on power plays inside or outside of tackles with two-on-one blocking from his unbalanced-T setup.

1956 SCHUDLE (1955 score):

Sept. 29—at Stanford (38-14)
Oct. 6—at Michigan (7-14)
Oct. 13—Indiana (20-13)
Oct. 20—at Notre Dame (21-7)
Oct. 27—at Illinois (21-7)
Nov. 3—Wisconsin (27-0)
Nov. 10—Purdue (27-0)
Nov. 17—at Minnesota (42-14)
Nov. 24—Kansas State (no game)

MICHIGAN
ANN ARBOR, MICH.

COLORS: Maize and blue.

BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple offense.

1955 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 38.

WATCH FOR: Tom Maentz, E; Ron Kramer, E; Terry Barr, B; Dick Hill, G.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: John Herrnstein, B; Bob Ptacek, B.

COACH BENNIE OOSTERBAAN SAYS: Michigan should be as good and possibly better than last year. Biggest problem is at the halfbacks, but, barring injuries, we should field a good first team. We expect to start two sophomores—208-pound Bob Ptacek at left half and 212-pound John Herrnstein at fullback. Ron Kramer is at left end, and we hope to keep him there unless backfield injuries force us to use him there. We should be improved at tackles, with guards and center better than average. If we can stay reasonably healthy in key spots we should be tough.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: Last year Michigan was an overrated team, as was proved as the season went on. But a serious approach to spring practice and an even more serious attitude this September spells a better season at Ann Arbor. Bob Ptacek (pronounced Tot-chek) and John Herrnstein are heralded as tremendous performers. Their end squad, headed by Kramer and Maentz, is the best in the country. Passing may not be strong, but it won't be because there are no good receivers. The much publicized Ron Kramer deserves every word of it. The Wolverines return virtually their entire line from tackle to tackle. Dick Hill at guard is one of the best performers in the college's recent history.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 29—UCLA (no game)
Oct. 6—Michigan State (14-7)
Oct. 13—Army (26-2)
Oct. 20—Northwestern (14-2)
Oct. 27—Minnesota (14-13)
Nov. 3—at Iowa (33-21)
Nov. 10—Illinois (6-25)
Nov. 17—Indiana (30-0)
Nov. 24—at Ohio State (0-17)

NOTRE DAME
SOUTH BEND, IND.

COLORS: Blue and gold.

BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T.

1955 RECORD: Won 8, lost 2.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16 of 30.

WATCH FOR : Paul Hornung, B; Aubrey Lewis, B; Jim Morse, B; Dick Prendergast, E.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Larry Cooke, B; Bob Wetoska, T.

COACH TERRY BRENNAN SAYS: I have found it necessary to make some personnel adjustments which we had not contemplated. The bright spots are some experienced quarterbacking in Larry Cooke and Paul Hornung, plus experience in two returning lettermen, Dick Prendergast, left end, and Bob Gaydos, left guard. Ed Sullivan, our center, had considerable playing time at tackle, as did Gene Hedrick at guard. We will be very green, and our only hope is to come along very fast with the help of our experienced quarterbacks.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: This year, as always, it seems, Notre Dame is confronted with the problem of replacing eight regulars and playing an overpowering schedule. Like a horse player, I have worked out my own system through the years. It's most complicated: just pick Notre Dame near the top. The Fighting Irish have finished in the top ten 16 times in the last 20 years. In fairness to Terry Brennan, the problem does seem more acute this year than ever before, especially with Michigan State and Oklahoma coming up on successive Saturdays. Hornung comes close to being a team himself, and Notre Dame's standards are high. The Irish may lose three games but can beat anybody on any given Saturday.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 22—at SMU, N (17-0)
Oct. 6—Indiana (19-0)
Oct. 13—Purdue (22-7)
Oct. 20—Michigan State (7-21)
Oct. 27—Oklahoma (no game)
Nov. 3—Navy at Baltimore (21-7)
Nov. 10—at Pittsburgh (no game)
Nov. 17—North Carolina (27-7)
Nov. 24—at Iowa (17-14)
Dec. 1—at USC (20-42)

OHIO STATE
COLUMBUS, OHIO

COLORS: Scarlet and gray.

BASIC OFFENSE: T, Split-T.

1955 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20 of 37.

WATCH FOR: Jim Parker, G; Frank Ellwood, B; William Michael, E-T.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Russ Bowermaster, E; Don Clark, B; Al Crawford, T.

COACH WOODY HAYES SAYS: We'll have another good club, with a chance of winning the best percentage of our games. But we do not have enough line material. We've analyzed the squad and decided we have 11 linemen and 11 backs of Big Ten caliber. That means we are 2¾ men deep in the backfield, but only 1[4/7] men deep in the line. I believe our Red Two [second string] is stronger than last year's. We're not worrying about championships. As soon as you do that you're gonna get hell kicked out of you. We're worrying about Illinois, after that, the next team. Replacing Cassady is our greatest problem. We're going to be pretty hard to whip.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: Coach Woody Hayes has established an enviable won-and-lost record at Ohio State. Backfield strength is deep. Line depth is the problem, although in Jim Parker, 255-pound guard and linebacker, they have one of the great linemen of this and last year. If the regular line can avoid injuries, Ohio State may again take the conference title. The offense will probably again be one of short gains and long marches. Remember, the Buckeyes do not meet Michigan State, while Michigan plays both States—Ohio and Michigan.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 29—Nebraska (28-20)
Oct. 6—Stanford (0-6)
Oct. 13—at Illinois (27-12)
Oct. 20—Penn State (no game)
Oct. 27—Wisconsin (26-16)
Nov. 3—at Northwestern (49-0)
Nov. 10—Indiana (20-13)
Nov. 17—at Iowa (20-10)
Nov. 24—Michigan (17-0)

OKLAHOMA
NORMAN, OKLA.

COLORS: Red and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T.

1955 RECORD: Won 10, lost 0.
Orange Bowl: defeated Maryland 20-6.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 28 of 38.

WATCH FOR: Jerry Tubbs, C; Tommy McDonald, B; Edmon Gray, T; Jim Harris, B.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Bob Harrison, C; Jakie Sandefer, B.

COACH BUD WILKINSON SAYS: Our squad reported for practice in excellent condition. We hope this indicates they will maintain the morale and hustle which made it possible for us to be a good team last year. We recognize that our opponents this fall will be far stronger and will have an even greater incentive to defeat us. To win this fall we will need the same great efforts. However, it is a fact in all athletic competition that few players try as hard to remain on top as they do to become champions. We feel this will be our greatest problem.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: Slightly paraphrasing the Bard: "Yon Sooners have a lean and hungry look. Such men are dangerous." This was the thought that struck my mind as the sun sizzled down on an early-morning practice session at Norman a few days ago. How Bud Wilkinson keeps them cavorting like kittens and hungry as lions no one knows. This is a select crew of veterans, but somehow you get the impression that they are not very large until scrimmage is called, and then they all look BIG. Speed is the backbone of this squad, supplemented by superior coaching technique. Wilkinson threatens to create more problems for his foes by additions to his attack.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 29—North Carolina (13-6)
Oct. 6—Kansas State (no game)
Oct. 13—Texas at Dallas (20-0)
Oct. 20—at Kansas (44-6)
Oct. 27—at Notre Dame (no game)
Nov. 3—at Colorado (56-21)
Nov. 10—at Iowa State (52-0)
Nov. 17—Missouri (20-0)
Nov. 24—Nebraska (41-0)
Dec. 1—at Oklahoma A&M (53-0)

TEXAS A&M
COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS

COLORS: Maroon and white.

BASIC OFFENSE: T, Split-T.

1955 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2, tied 1.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 30.

WATCH FOR: Jack Pardee, B; John Crow, B; Dennis Goehring, G; Eugene Stallings, E.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATES: Richard Gay, B; Ken Beck, T.

COACH PAUL BRYANT SAYS: I am very much disturbed about our team this year due to recent injuries to key players, loss of our right tackle, Jack Powell, and the uncertainty of the quarterback situation. I thought after spring training we would have a real good first team, but now I am not sure about it, because several who played over their heads last fall are not doing anything this fall. Osborne, who I thought would be No. 1 quarterback, is injured again, as he has been ever since he came to A&M. Powell being ineligible leaves us without a right tackle, and I have nobody at this time to replace him. I couldn't be optimistic in the face of all this.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: A probation, which has been lifted by the SWC but not yet by the NCAA, may prevent Bear Bryant's Aggies from being in a bowl game on New Year's Day, but it won't preclude them from being the hardest-hitting team in the country. These Aggies play for keeps, big or small, experienced or inexperienced. Actually, they are not too small and not too inexperienced. Only significant loss from last year's two teams is Tackle Jack Powell. Fullback Jack Pardee and Halfback John Crow furnish a one-two punch comparable to any.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score):

Sept. 22—Villanova (no game)
Sept. 29—at LSU, N (28-0)
Oct. 6—Texas Tech at Dallas, N (no game)
Oct. 13—at Houston, N (21-3)
Oct. 20—TCU (19-16)
Oct. 27—at Baylor, N (19-7)
Nov. 3—Arkansas, N (7-7)
Nov. 10—at SMU (13-2)
Nov. 17—Rice (20-12)
Nov. 29—at Texas (6-21)

YALE
NEW HAVEN, CONN.

COLOR: Yale blue.

BASIC OFFENSE: T, split-T.

1955 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2.

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 31 of 33.

WATCH FOR: Paul Lopata, E; Dennis McGill, B; Mike Owseichik, C; Al Ward, B.

LEADING SOPHOMORE CANDIDATE: Alex Kroll, C.

COACH JORDAN OLIVAR SAYS: We are anticipating a real finished and polished performance from our first group. These boys will be playing together as a unit for the fourth year in a row, including an undefeated freshman season. Everyone is talking about an undefeated season. We realize that these are very few and far between. But teams with the potential of this year's are, by the same token, also very few and far between. Because of our experience, we should not lose games by mistakes. If we do lose, it will be because opponents have won on their own merit.

HERMAN HICKMAN SAYS: On the strength of last year's record and light graduation losses, Yale must be picked as one of the top teams in the nation. On my recent tour when Yale was mentioned as a possibility on the "Eleven Elevens," I was asked if I was really serious. I am. The Bulldogs are well fortified at quarterback with Dean Loucks and Dick Winterbauer; Dennis McGill is the best running back in modern Yale history. Although Gene Coker was lost at fullback by a recent injury, two replacements are strong. The ends are the best in a decade in size, ability and depth. The middle of the line has some problems, but, barring injury at the halfback position, Yale should sweep the Ivy League.

1956 SCHEDULE (1955 score)

Sept. 29—Connecticut (14-0)
Oct. 6—Brown (27-20)
Oct. 13—at Columbia (46-14)
Oct. 20—Cornell (34-6)
Oct. 27—Colgate (0-7)
Nov. 3—Dartmouth (20-0)
Nov. 10—Penn (no game)
Nov. 17—Princeton (0-13)
Nov. 24—at Harvard (21-7)

ILLUSTRATIONTHE CHOICES FOR 1956: Surrounding Old Coach Herman Hickman are the 11 men who have molded the best elevens of the current football year. They are Earl H. Blaik of Army (85); Bud Wilkinson of Oklahoma (58); Bill Murray of Duke (23); Bennie Oosterbaan of Michigan (86); Jordan Olivar of Yale (76); Duffy Daugherty of Michigan State (68); Woody Hayes of Ohio State (75); Paul Bryant of Texas A&M (63); Bobby Dodd of Georgia Tech (22); Terry Brennan of Notre Dame (15) and Andy Gustafson of Miami (16). PHOTOEARL BLAIK
COACH
PHOTOED SZVETECZ
CENTER
PHOTOBILL MURRAY
COACH
PHOTOBUDDY BASS
END
PHOTOBOBBY DODD
COACH
PHOTOGEORGE VOLKERT
HALFBACK
PHOTOANDY GUSTAFSON
COACH
PHOTODON BOSSELER
FULLBACK
PHOTODUFFY DAUGHERTY
COACH
PHOTOJOHN MATSKO
CENTER
PHOTOBENNIE OOSTERBAAN
COACH
PHOTOTOM MAENTZ
END
PHOTOTERRY BRENNAN
COACH
PHOTOJIM MORSE
HALFBACK
PHOTOWOODY HAYES
COACH
PHOTOWILLIAM MICHAEL
END
PHOTOBUD WILKINSON
COACH
PHOTOJERRY TUBBS
CENTER
PHOTOPAUL BRYANT
COACH
PHOTOJACK PARDEE
FULLBACK
PHOTOJORDAN OLIVAR
COACH
PHOTOMIKE OWSEICHIK
CENTER

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)