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NEW YORK YANKEES

Oct. 01, 1956
Oct. 01, 1956

Table of Contents
Oct. 1, 1956

Yanks Vs. Nationals
Footloose
The Wonderful World Of Sport
Events & Discoveries
The Illegal Whole's Legal Half
The Sporting Look
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back
Departments

NEW YORK YANKEES

THE PITCHERS

This is an article from the Oct. 1, 1956 issue Original Layout

18 WHITEY FORD
Throws L. Record 19-5. ERA 2.52. One of the most highly respected pitchers in majors; at his best in the tough game. Seems small, but big enough to throw good fast ball off excellent curve. Has puzzling changeup, sound knowledge of hitters. Pitches to spots. Would rather walk dangerous man than give him fat pitch. Has superb pickoff move to first.

53 JOHNNY KUCKS
Throws R. Record 18-8. ERA 3.81. Developed into one of league's best after only two years of organized ball following mediocre 8-7 record as big league rookie last year. Keeps ball low, has good speed and excellent curve. Control, which hurt him at times in '55, has been no problem this year. Tall and slender, moves and fields position well.

47 TOM STURDIVANT
Throws R. Record 15-8. ERA 3.26. Another second-year man whose performance was even bigger surprise than that of Kucks; took up great deal of slack left by failure of McDermott, mediocre showing of Larsen, Turley, Byrne. Has good fast ball that moves, tailing away from right-hand batter and highly effective knuckler. A real battler.

23 TOMMY BYRNE
Throws L. Record 7-3. ERA 3.48. Early-season illness has left him far behind brilliant 16-5 comeback record of '55. Still very tough in spots. Has good fast ball and curve but big pitch is slider. Control, once a problem, is good. Sometimes talks to hitters, works fast and with great relaxation; almost impossible to rattle. One of baseball's best hitting pitchers.

18 DON LARSEN
Throws R. Record 10-5. ERA 3.40. Very erratic but tougher than nails when right. Big, hard-throwing fast-baller who can overpower the hitter but does not depend on speed alone; has good slider, throws occasional knuckler, this year developed an effective change of pace. Temperamental and sometimes rattles easily. Very good hitter.

19 BOB TURLEY
Throws R. Record 8-4. ERA 4.89. Big, strong and powerful—but wild. Yankees are still waiting for him to live up to potential. Fast ball blazes, but when he begins to aim it in attempt to gain control, he's easy to hit. Appears to have lost confidence, has had poor season. Curve is weak; needs another pitch. Like most Yankee pitchers, is good hitter.

THE HITTERS

7 MICKEY MANTLE, CF
Bats L-R. .356 avg. 51 HR. Heir apparent to Ruth despite late-season slump. Can beat you a dozen ways. Tremendous power from either side, wonderful speed on bases or in field, powerful arm. Will hit it over fence or bunt for hit. Pitch him high and tight, slip in occasional curve, move ball around—and pray. Only 24, this is his fifth World Series.

8 YOGI BERRA, C
Bats L. .301 avg. 29 HR. Probably best clutch hitter in the game. Smacks vicious line drives toward close right-field stands in stadium; play him tight around to right. Pitch him high and inside, slip fast ball across on outside after setting it up—but don't try this often. No. 1 catcher in baseball; strong arm, never stops hustling.

9 HANK BAUER, RF
Bats R. .240 avg. 26 HR. Aggressive, mean competitor with one of great arms in baseball; don't run on him. Has had bad year average-wise, but don't let that fool you—look at his home-run figures and 93 RBIs; he can hit the long ball. Can be fooled by a curve, and right-handers can side-arm him effectively. Most daring Yankee base runner.

1 BILLY MARTIN, 2B
Bats R. .268 avg. 9 HR. This his meat; always a scrapper, he soars to the heights in a World Series. Sparkplug of Yankee infield, solid defensive man, sure on double play. Lacks real speed but runs bases well, takes chances, will steal. Not much power, sprays hits to all fields, tough in clutch. Likes pitch up high; work ball around down low.

12 GIL McDOUGALD, SS
Bats R. .308 avg. 12 HR. After playing second and third, took over at short this year as though he owned it. Tremendous versatility helps Stengel maneuver entire Yankee infield. Outstanding fast-ball hitter; use fast ball only as waste pitch, curve him, change up, move ball around. Has fair power, good speed, runs bases well, will bunt and steal.

14 BILL SKOWRON, 1B
Bats R. .306 avg. 21 HR. Packs great power to all fields but has hit in streaks this year. Casey no longer platoons him against left-handers. Pitch him fast and very tight, try to make him chase low one occasionally. Hits curve well, murders anything high and across outside corner. Only fair defensively but improving. Deceptively fast.

17 ENOS SLAUGHTER, LF
Bats L. .278 avg. 2 HR. In short Series, old (40) Country could look like a sophomore. Still gets his hits, hustles all the time, adequate defensively if a little slower. Looked great in late-season Yankee games and must rate ahead of Rookie Siebern, Second-year Man Howard. Likes a high pitch he can pull but will slap the outside pitch to left. Keep ball low.

6 ANDY CAREY, 3B
Bats R. .237 avg. 7 HR. Good defensive infielder with strong arm, one of best at handling bunts. At plate gets by on determination, and is not standout hitter. Will hit to opposite field a lot, good on hit-and-run, power only fair. Good stuff down low and away will get him out; curve him, use changeup. Has fair speed, runs bases well, will steal.

15 JOE COLLINS, 1B-OF
Bats L. .229 avg. 7 HR. Not a high-average hitter but a very dangerous one; No. 1 Yankee pinch-hitter against right-handers, is famed for breaking up tight games. Murders low balls. Will probably see little action in outfield, barring injuries, but may sub for Skowron. A magician with the glove at first base, less talented defensively in outfield.

BOARD OF STRATEGY

37 Casey Stengel made it look easy as he sent the Yankees off fast for their seventh pennant under his leadership. Still the master juggler, Casey plays percentages all the way. Any gambles he makes are based on sound theory. 33 BILL DICKEY handles the first-base coaching box, while 2 FRANKIE CROSETTI sends the runners home from third. 31 JIM TURNER is responsible for the pitchers.

The New York bench gives Stengel the working room he needs. 42 JERRY COLEMAN (R) and 20 BILLY HUNTER (R) are valuable utility infielders who can play second, short or third. 32 ELSTON HOWARD (R), a fair outfielder and good catcher, hits with power. 41 BOB CERV (R), a power hitting pinch-hitter, and Rookie 36 NORM SIEBERN (L) are adequate outfield replacements. Infielder 40 TOM CARROLL (R), Catcher 29 CHARLIE SILVERA (R) and Outfielder 39 GEORGE WILSON (L) will see little action. 55 BOB GRIM (R), NO. 1 reliever, could start. 28 TOM
MORGAN (R), 30 RIP COLEMAN (L) and 22 MICKEY McDERMOTT (L) will be used mainly in relief.

Yankee stadium has been the scene of 51 World Series games since it was built in 1923. So vast that no one has ever hit a fair ball out of it, the stadium's triple-decked stands cast troublesome shadows in the late innings. The hitter who can pull a ball sharply will find the short foul lines to his liking but long balls to the spacious reaches of center field are easy outs.

THREE ILLUSTRATIONSSIXTEEN PHOTOS

YANKEE STADIUM

Right Field Foul Line
Left Field Foul Line
51 in. TO 43 in. HIGH
7 ft. 10 in. TO 13 ft. 10 in. HIGH
45 in. TO 43 in. HIGH
301 ft.
402 FT.
457 FT.
461 FT.
407 FT.
367 FT.
344 FT.
296 ft.
N