THE PROS

November 19, 1956

EASTERN CONFERENCE

The New York Giants' defense passed its final examinations against the split-T last Sunday. The massive, extraordinarily active Giant line contained the Chicago Cardinal running attack magnificently, and the New Yorkers won 23-10 before 62,410 in Yankee Stadium. The beautifully conceived Giant defense was keyed on the Cardinal guards. If the guards blocked to their outside, the big Giant tackles—Roosevelt Grier and Jim Katcavage—closed up the middle. If the guards blocked in, the Giant linebackers shot through the resulting gap and stymied the Cardinal running before it could start. Consequently Ollie Matson, one of pro football's truly great runners, gained only 43 yards in 13 tries.

The Giant offense, on the other hand, lured the Cardinal defenders into untenable positions often enough to keep their attack in high gear. Frank Gifford, a marvelously versatile 205-pound halfback from USC, twice freed himself to take long passes from Charlie Conerly, and thundering blocks by the ponderous Giant offensive line pried consistent cracks for Gifford and Alex Webster to exploit along the ground. The victory gave the Giants sole possession of first place in the East.

The Philadelphia Eagles, relying on the pass catching of Giant castoff Hank Burnine, a rookie end from Missouri, beat the Pittsburgh stealers 14-7. Burnine scored one touchdown and set up another on two long catches. The Cleveland Browns Could not cope with Halfback Lennie Moore, who led the Baltimore Colts to a 21-7 triumph. Moore ran 70 yards for one Colt score, his third run of 70 yards or more in the last two games.

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W

L

T

Pct.

Giants

6

1

0

.857

Cardinals

5

2

0

.714

Redskins

3

3

0

.500

Eagles

3

4

0

.429

Browns

2

5

0

.286

Steelers

2

5

0

.286

WESTERN CONFERENCE

The Detroit Lions, who have been living dangerously on the remarkable rejuvenation of Old Pro Bobby Layne and the unrookielike excellence of Rookies Don McIlhenny and Hopalong Cassady, finally came a cropper. They lost 18-17 to the resurgent Washington Redskins, who used some pretty lively youngsters of their own. Tom Runnels and Dick James, their young halfbacks, both ran well and, when the Redskin defense rose up in wrath in the second half, the Lions found no running room. Layne, throwing indefatigably, connected on a 71-yard pass-run play to Jim Doran in the last two minutes, but it was not enough.

The Chicago Bears, who have week by week confirmed the opinion that they are the best in the West, moved into a tie for first with Detroit by lashing the Green Bay Packers 38-14. The Bears lost little Perry Jeter, their fine rookie scatback, on the first play of the game and replaced him with big End Bill McColl. With McColl set as a flanker, the Bears played the rest of the game with what amounted to three pass-catching ends and a three-man backfield. It only seemed to make them more explosive than ever. Ed Brown, strictly a journeyman quarterback in previous seasons, retained first place among the league's passers by completing eight of 10 for an average gain of 18 yards each. On the other hand, the Bear pass defenders, wheeling around J. C. Caroline, intercepted five of Tobin Rote's attempts for the Packers. Incidentally, Jeter, who broke a small bone in his ankle, will probably be out for four weeks.

The Los Angeles Rams, whose undismayed fans turned out 69,828 strong to watch them play the San Francisco 49ers despite five straight losses, repaid the faithful with a 30-6 victory.

W

L

T

Pct.

Bears

6

1

0

.857

Lions

6

1

0

.857

Colts

3

3

0

.500

Packers

2

5

0

.286

Rams

2

5

0

.286

49ers

1

6

0

.143

PHOTOJUGULAR GRIP by Card Chuck Ulrich (72) hampers block by Giant Jack Stroud (66); Giant End Kyle Rote (44) is shocked.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)