FOOTBALL: THE MANIKINS
Sirs:
Please tell me where I could get a set of the manikins you used to demonstrate the Oklahoma-Notre Dame game (A New Perspective, SI, Oct. 29).
JOHN BARRETT
Detroit

Sirs:
Are the manikins for sale? I would be interested in buying a set.
PHILIP COLOMBRITO JR.
Miami

Sirs:
My friends and I like to map out plays, and if we had these manikins it would be even more fun. What would be the cost?
BILL WOLFE
Austin, Texas

Sirs:
I am a rabid football fan, and I attend at least two or three football games a week. I thought it would be nice if, when I come home, I could show my friends some of the plays in the game. I have tried to make miniature football players and failed. I would pay any amount of money you wanted for 22 of these small players.
MICKEY DONOGHUE
Wheeling, W. Va.

•The players are 15-inch articulated artist's manikins, readily available in art supplies stores. Although SPORTS ILLUSTRATED manikins have specially molded faces, feet and helmets, Messrs. Barrett, Colombrito, Wolfe and Donoghue should be able to persuade a nimble-fingered female relation to whip up a set of uniforms.—ED.

Sirs:
Correct me if I am wrong, but the way I see A New Perspective: Oklahoma, the play as illustrated by SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S football manikins is illegal.

You have No. 65, the right guard, going through to block on the linebacker. Since the play is a pass, No. 65 is either throwing an illegal downfield block on a pass play or is an illegal receiver across the line of scrimmage or both.

If the play is actually run this way it certainly is a new perspective to me.
ROBERT L. MILLER
End Coach
Ypsilanti High School
Ypsilanti, Mich.

•Right. We have penalized our art department 15 yards.—ED.

FOOTBALL: AN EVEN SWAP
Sirs:
In recent weeks both Cornell and Notre Dame have suffered some rather discouraging setbacks. Since both teams are acknowledged to have potential greatness in their respective leagues, we feel that the fault may lie with the coaching staffs. Therefore if South Bend is willing, we suggest that both teams might benefit from a trade of coaches. We'll take Terry Brennan if they'll take Lefty James.
WILLIAM J. McGIRR '59
LAWRENCE J. SEVERINO '58
Cornell University
Ithaca, N.Y.

FOOTBALL: H. H. ON THE SPOT
Sirs:
We at Penn would like to know why Herman Hickman includes the University of Pennsylvania in his HUNCHES only when they are such heavy underdogs. A true expert will pick any game no matter how evenly the teams are matched.

I imagine you will pick the Yale game, since Yale will be a heavy favorite over Penn. But I am sure we would all like to see your choice in the Columbia vs. Penn and Cornell vs. Penn games.
LEWIS LORIN
Philadelphia

•Hunching off the top of his head, Herman Hickman picks Pennsylvania over both Columbia (Nov. 17) and Cornell (Nov. 22) but reserves the right to change his hunches on further study.—ED.

FOOTBALL: RECRUIT OR PERISH
Sirs:
I believe that both the NCAA and the NAIA should include a regulation which totally prohibits contact in his home, in person or by letter, of any high school athlete by the coach or by any member of the coaching staff.

Athletes might be contacted, as other prospective students are, by a member of the college's regular extension staff, but these visits should be limited to one only. Scholarship applications should be made by mail on forms furnished by the university's regular scholarship committee and their award handled through this office. Make the scholarship request come from the student, as it must in every other field.

My husband is a college coach, and he (and surely the others) thoroughly hates this business of going out and trying to outsell the other fellow. But under the present rules he must do it to survive. Nobody likes it except the athlete and his proud parents.
HELEN FRANCIS
Hays, Kans.

FOOTBALL: REAPPRAISAL AT FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL
Sirs:
We here at Franklin and Marshall College thought you might be interested in learning about an institution adopting a new policy in this era of subsidization and recruiting.

We have been playing intercollegiate football since 1887 and are participants with Gettysburg College in one of the longest series of small college football in the country. This year we will be playing the 59th game in this series.

Big-time football teams vanished from Franklin and Marshall several years ago, but we have been subsidizing some of our athletes. The enclosed memorandum, explaining our new policy, may be of interest to your readers.
J. SHOBER BARR
Dean of Athletics
Lancaster, Pa.

•Dean Barr's memorandum states in part. "In recent years Franklin and Marshall has subsidized athletes to the extent of $20,000 a year. It had been obvious to the Roard of Trustees for some years that our policy was ambiguous.... We could either invest more money in athletics and schedule colleges with a comparable policy, or we could withdraw all aid specifically designated for athletes and schedule colleges with a similar policy. The decision ultimately had to be based on the purposes for which the college exists.... Our decision to withdraw $20,000 a year from the subsidization of athletes does not mean...that we plan to deny students all financial assistance. It is our intention to continue with our scholarship programs and to augment the $80,000 set aside for the purpose by the $20,000 removed from the athletic budget."—ED.

FOOTBALL: THE NEWS FROM HEIDELBERG
Sirs:
Why is it that all sports announcers and all sports publications ignore Heidelberg College at Tiffin, Ohio?

Year after year they come up with outstanding teams, beating schools with much larger student bodies.

I am not connected with Heidelberg but simply want to know.
PAUL L. ROSENKRANS
Hummelstown, Pa.

•To date, Heidelberg's Student Princes have waltzed over Hope, Wabash, Baldwin-Wallace, Ohio Wesleyan, Wittenberg, and Denison but lost to Mount Union. Record through 1946 to date: 80 wins, 11 losses, 4 ties.—ED.

FOOTBALL: KEEP COOL
Sirs:
As a new reader I'm not sure that Jack Olsen's cutting and bitter report on the Oklahoma-Notre Dame game (SI, Nov. 5) was unprecedented. It seemed to me that Olsen preferred whoop-and-holler, fight-team-fight games as opposed to less passionate but no less determined athletics. Another writer in the same issue praised Quarterback John Brodie, "who treats football as an art rather than an emotional outlet."

I'm not sure where SPORTS ILLUSTRATED stands, but I want to mention my alma mater, Georgia Tech, which has long been a "cool" school. A Tech lineman epitomized this athletic savoir-faire some four years ago in one of the University of Alabama's last good games. Tech was in front 7-3 in the closing minutes, but Marlow, Tharp & Co. were running well, threatening to upset Tech. It reached a fourth-and-two situation inside the Tech 10-yard line, and Alabama came roaring from the huddle, as was their custom, with much growling and gnashing of teeth. As they lined up to glare viciously at the calm defense, a Tech guard noted, with the proper touch of enthusiasm, "Getting to be an exciting game, isn't it!" It was, indeed, but cool heads prevailed, and Tech—the sinners—won again.
CY PHILLIPS
Schenectady, N.Y.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)