The Question: Will the colleges throughout the country follow the lead of the Ivy League and de-emphasize football?

January 07, 1957

SENATOR WILLIAM F. KNOWLAND
Minority Leader
U.S. Senate
No. The alumni, the general public and the universities are geared to the present scale and tempo of football. A country-wide de-emphasis would be disastrous financially Penn and Cornell used to play to 70,000, This year, under Ivy League rules, they played to 17,000.

GENERAL ALFRED M. GRUENTHER
Former Supreme Commander of NATO
I think that the college football situation is going to remain relatively the same. The public wants games like Army-Navy, Harvard-Yale, the Rose Bowl and conference championships. Perhaps the best solution is to refuse any compensation other than tuition and keep to players.

DR. GAYLORD P. HARNWELL
President
University of Pennsylvania
Yes. Whether they will follow our method I don't know. We had our problems which we have tried to meet. There are various aids we can give to students—for scholastic attainment and on the basis of need. Athletic ability should not be the sole consideration. Football is wonderful.

WILBER M. BRUCKER
Secretary of the Army
No. Conditions will continue very much as they are. So much money is involved that professionally minded players will continue shopping around for the best offers. Personally, I'd like to see big-time college football continue with the professionalism taken out of it.

MAJ. GEN. GAR H. DAVIDSON
Superintendent
U.S. Military Academy
West Point
No. I don't think the Ivy League's approach to the problem is realistic. This approach hasn't stopped recruiting of football players. If anything, recruiting becomes more important to these colleges because it's a great honor to win the Ivy League championship and a true test of ability.

REAR ADMIRAL WILLIAM R. SMEDBERG III
Superintendent
U.S. Naval Academy
Annapolis
No. While continuing to require high academic standing, we will continue the present emphasis on football because it teaches team effort—which is so important in the Navy, aboard ship and in the air. We feel that this is more important than any attempt at de-emphasis.

DR. W. R. WHITE
President
Baylor University
The pattern set by the Southwest Conference, with slight modifications, is sound. Athletes get board, room, tuition, fees and laundry money. They are denied some privileges available to the average student. They use up much study time and forego many campus activities.

BIGGIE MUNN
Director of Athletics
Michigan State University
No. We need more athletic competition in this country, not less. Why is it that 40% of our boys can't pass Army physicals? It is more important to stress athletics than to de-emphasize. We have a great football team at Michigan State, but we also have 140 touch football teams.

DR. ROSCOE L. WEST
President
State Teachers College
Trenton, N.J.
That all depends on the results of the Ivy League's experiment. Many smaller colleges have already de-emphasized. College football will survive—not because it is played by great teams like Oklahoma but because it is played at hundreds of smaller colleges throughout the country.

DR. C. E. BREHM
President
University of Tennessee
I think they will. What I think the Ivy League has done is reappraise the value of football in its relation to the educational system. There is a definite relationship, but football can get out of hand without proper academic controls. There is a happy compromise which many colleges have found.

CHARLES S. THOMAS
Secretary of the Navy
Not entirely. I think that there eventually will be a balance between complete de-emphasis and semipro college football. I do not think any group wants complete de-emphasis, not even the Ivy League. If players were not paid, most of the abuses would immediately disappear.

C. CLEMENT FRENCH
President
Washington State College
Actions of recent years throughout the country show that colleges have been continually re-evaluating football. The Ivy League pattern is reasonably applicable to private institutions in a populous area, but I don't think it is equally applicable to public institutions in our area.

ELMER LOWER
Columbia Broadcasting Co., Director of Special Projects
No. College football is far too big and too wonderful. In many colleges the tremendous revenues pay the cost of all other sports. I think there will be a basic agreement between colleges on how much help will be given football players, beyond which colleges won't go, but that's all.

FOURTEEN PHOTOS

NEXT WEEK:

Should there be a height limit in basketball?

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)