Especially for high- and middle-handicap golfers

January 21, 1957

The only uniform feature in the game of the average golfer is his inconsistency. He cannot understand why he will play one shot well and the next one poorly. The explanation is simple. He plays an occasional shot well because, accidentally, he was properly organized for the shot.

Consistency can be developed. I suggest that the average golfer stop thinking about his mistakes and concentrate instead on developing the habit of organizing the essentials of good shotmaking.

His grip must be correct. Then his club and body should be properly coordinated at address so that he will be taking aim in the right way. He should make sure his legs are relaxed and his weight is correctly distributed so that he can use it properly on the backswing. This will allow him to get the proper weight shift and hip and shoulder turn, which are essential if the player is to be properly balanced at the top of his backswing. When the body works correctly on the backswing, it makes the work to be done by the arms and the hands on the downswing much easier, and it results in greater power. These are the things a golfer should try to learn to execute, and he should make careful plans for executing them to his best ability before he plays each shot.

from EDDIE WILLIAMS, Louisville Country Club

TWO PHOTOS ILLUSTRATIONCorrect ILLUSTRATIONIncorrect ILLUSTRATIONCorrect ILLUSTRATIONIncorrect

NEXT WEEK'S PRO: PATTY BERG ON THE HEAD AS THE ANCHOR

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)