The Question: Should there be an open in tennis as there is in golf?

February 25, 1957

CELESTE HOLM
Beverly Hills and New York
Movie star
Yes, and if for no other reason than to get Tony Trabert, former champion, back into the picture. Tony was once a world figure in tennis. You hear little of him since Pancho Gonzales won in their worldwide professional tour. A tennis open would give Tony new recognition.

JOSEPH W. MARTIN
Minority Leader of the House
I can't think of a single objection to an open in tennis, and with good reason. For one thing, the open in golf has done more than all the amateur tournaments ever held to make golf the popular and highly publicized game it is. If the open can do that for golf, it can for tennis.

LIEUT. RALPH GUGLIELMI
USAF
Former All-American quarterback
Definitely. In tennis, the United States is behind the eight ball. Tennis ability in Australia is a stepping stone to a lucrative career. So everybody plays tennis. An open in this country would encourage kids to play tennis. The open has helped golf. A youngster could remain an amateur if he wished.

RON COCHRAN
CBS
Television commentator
Yes. The impression lingers with millions who do not belong to country clubs that they haven't got a chance because tennis competition is social and high-toned. An open would not destroy the amateurism in tennis, but would broaden the base of competition and give us a lot more top players.

VINCENT RICHARDS
Former Olympic tennis champion
Yes. Professional tennis has been fighting for a tennis open since 1927. Amateur tennis is doomed unless it is rescued by open tournaments. They would give tennis added publicity and attract more young players by giving them an incentive, just as the open in golf has done.

PERLE MESTA
Washington
Former Ambassador to Luxembourg
Yes. That would be the greatest thing for tennis, not only here, but in other countries. How could an "open," once a year, hurt the amateur standing of those representing us in the Davis Cup competition? An open in golf hasn't hurt the standing of the golf amateurs.

MR. JUSTICE WILLIAM O. DOUGLAS
U.S. Supreme Court
I'm strongly in favor of an open in tennis to stimulate interest in the game among our boys and girls. A tennis open would hold out the prospect of a career in tennis for the more able players. Many more of our boys would undoubtedly start playing the game more seriously and objectively.

GENERAL CLIFTON B. CATES
Former Commandant of U.S. Marine Corps
Why not? In a sense, we do have an open in football, where the very best of the college players play the champion pro team each year in Chicago for the Chicago Tribune charities. The open in golf has worldwide interest. The low state of tennis demands an open to give it needed interest.

ARTHUR W. MACPHERSON
New York
Davis Cup Committee
Yes. But many in tennis are opposed. Since the Davis Cup was given for world competition, it has been our aim to present the best players we can assemble. Amateur tournaments between countries are wonderful, but we should help develop our best amateurs through a national open.

JOHN T. COX
U.S. Naval Academy
Sports publicity director
Definitely. An open would add great interest. Tennis fans would love it. A national open would greatly benefit the young amateur by giving him experience against the top pros. However, the biggest boost for tennis would be the widespread construction of municipal courts.

MAURICE E. McLOUGHLIN
Singles champion 1912 and 1913
I am more favorable than otherwise. If, as in golf, the open can be controlled through the coordinated efforts of representative associations maintaining proper jurisdiction over the professional as well as the amateur game, I believe the prestige and high standards of both could be maintained.

ROBERT A. SMALLEY
Miami
Vice-President
Couture Rent A Car
Yes. Tennis became big time when it moved from the Newport (R.I.) Casino to Forest Hills. To remain big time we must encourage our boys to play tennis. Municipal courts and the lure of a national open would help. In Australia, most boys play tennis just as ours play baseball.

KEN WILLSON
Raleigh, N.C.
Vice-President
Tobacco Radio Network
Yes. We used to be the greatest tennis country in the world, but tennis is losing out as a spectator sport. Shades of Bill Tilden, Don Budge and Jack Kramer. What goes? If we don't look out, the championships will be back in the Newport Casino. An open would be a hypo for tennis.

FOURTEEN PHOTOS

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