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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 01, 1957
April 01, 1957

Table of Contents
April 1, 1957

Twilight Of The Bums
Sebring
Events & Discoveries
Preview
Skiing
Fauna In The Sun
Wrestler Hodge
Fisherman's Calendar
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Acknowledgments
Pat On The Back

19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

HOGAN: ON-THE-JOB TRAINING
Sirs:
Hogan is fabulous (The Modern Fundamentals of Golf, SI, March 11, 18, 25). It's the first time words and illustrations have made golfing technique absolutely clear. Of course, it's going to throw a lot of people off their game temporarily, but if they'll persist with Hogan's teaching, they'll be far better golfers. I'm applying the lessons to my teaching program here and highly recommending them to my pupils. I have my pupils saving their copies, working right along with Hogan. From the first two parts, I'd say it's the greatest instruction series of all time. Women are particularly keen on it. It'll make a lot of new golfers—good golfers.
FRANK SADLER
Professional, Bellingham CC
Bellingham, Wash.

This is an article from the April 1, 1957 issue Original Layout

HOGAN: COLLABORATORS
Sirs:
My hat is off to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and to Ben Hogan for the terrific articles about the art of golf. So far I've gotten more good from his articles than from actual lessons from a pro here.

The illustrations are wonderful and really carry Mr. Hogan's points across.
ROBERT S. SABO
Linden, N.J.

HOGAN: PROOF PERFECT
Sirs:
Thank you very much. You have proved my point. SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Ben Hogan are both perfectionists.
FRANK H. WATSON JR.
Lodi, Calif.

HOGAN: A HALF-CENTURY OF GOLF
Sirs:
I think Ben Hogan's articles about golf are most exceptional. I sincerely hope these articles will be published in small booklet form. It is the best set of instructions on golf that I have ever seen and I have been following golf for about 50 years.
HUGH MUNRO
Boston

HOGAN: PERMANENT RECORD
Sirs:
You should have looseleafed Mr. Hogan's articles so readers could bind it into one volume when the series is completed.

These are going to be the best articles ever written on golf.
C. W. TUCKER
Rutland, Vt.

HOGAN: SCHISM?
Sirs:
In EVENTS & DISCOVERIES (SI, March 18) you made the grade as true Sam Sausages of golf. Here you quote Jimmy Demaret as improving his golf considerably by a change in grip: "I moved my right hand under and my left hand over."

This, of course, is completely at odds with advice offered in the first of an excellent series by Ben Hogan on The Modem Fundamentals of Golf (SI, March 11). Yet your piece made not the slightest effort to account for this sore-thumb disparity. It beat the hell out of this reader, barely under way trying to adopt the Hogan grip.

Red Smith, in his column, quotes Demaret as "bringing the right hand over a little and the left under." This is in accord with Hogan's advice.

Doubtlessly, a double check would get you out of the drink and reveal that one of the first golfers to profit by the Hogan series happens to be the famed professional, Demaret, now playing some of the finest golf of his 40-year career.

Any way your ball bounces, I think you owe us confused and shaken hackers—and, certainly, Ben Hogan—some sort of explanation.
JOHN M. MOORHEAD
New York

•No Sam Sausages on this course. Jimmy Demaret changed his grip as described in EVENTS & DISCOVERIES to counteract a pronounced fade to the right.—ED.

TENNIS: IT'S ABOUT TIME
Sirs:
Congratulations! Richard Phelan's colorful and realistically interesting article on Pancho the Great (SI, March 18) was superbly done and in mighty good style!

For once, tennis really got a break after issue after issue of articles on so-called big-time football, baseball, basketball and track.

Richard Gonzales has to be ranked as one of the truly alltime greats of all champions; Gonzales has been ruler of the courts, both amateur and professional, ever since your first issue was published back in 1954!

Having played on the same courts in Exposition Park, Los Angeles, during Pancho's brief amateur career from 1947 to 1949, I can so vividly recall the start of his championship form in tennis. From his freshman year in the pro ranks to the present day he has been the greatest of them all, blasting the best—Kramer, Segura, Sedgman, Trabert, Kovacs, Riggs, and now Rose-wall—during his many victorious worldwide tournaments and tours! The way Pancho's going, he'll be the best of them all indefinitely!

Let's have more of the same soon, to get tennis to the top where it belongs!
GERALD G. VICK
Redlands, Calif.

BOXING: WHAT'S THE SCORE?
Sirs:
Judge Ryan's decision to restore boxing to the purpose for which it originally was conceived (IBC: Guilty as Charged, SI, March 18) imposes upon you an obligation to promote other changes designed to increase the stadium or arena audience without which boxing would not survive.

Two grown men punching each other in a vacant room for the benefit of an unseen audience behind camera eyes is not likely, in the long run, to add any laurels to boxing as a sport.

But there is one change that ought to be made now. It should have been made years ago. Now that ability and merit appear to be in the offing, replacing chicanery, the fix and Norris, re-establishment of boxing as a sport can best be accomplished by permitting an audience to know at every moment of the contest what the score is.

Can you think of another sport where the present standing, or score, is not at all times known during the progress of the contest?

Everyone should know at every minute which contestant—the one in white trunks or the one in black trunks—is leading.
EDWARD A. COLLINS
New York

FISHING: HANDY BILLFOLD KEY
Sirs:
Here is a simple key to use in differentiating between rainbow trout, brown trout and Atlantic salmon (Excalibur: The Steelhead, SI, March 11):

Rainbow trout have 10 or more fully developed rays in the anal fin.

Brown trout and Atlantic salmon have only eight or nine fully developed rays in the anal fin.

Atlantic salmon have 13 or fewer rows of scales between the lateral line and the adipose fin.

Brown trout have 14 rows of scales between the lateral line and the adipose fin.

There are other differences but this key can be carried in the billfold and used right on the stream. This will not differentiate between Pacific salmon and rainbow trout. The key was verified as correct by Dr. Samuel Eddy, known fish authority at the University of Minnesota.

Rainbows are not the only trout that run to the sea. Brown and cutthroat trout also go to sea. The charrs, brook trout and Dolly Varden trout also have a tendency to go to salt water or a large lake. When these fish go to the sea, or to some large lakes, they have a tendency to lose most of their spots and most of their color. They regain their color as they ascend the stream and spawning time approaches.
D. G. RAUENHORST
Slayton, Minn.

HOCKEY: THAT'S ALL
Sirs:
I want you to know how very much I enjoyed your story Wings of the Red Wings by Marshall Dann (SI, March 18). Also, I loved the cover with the picture of Lindsay and Howe. These two are wonderful players. Hockey is a great game and has much excitement. People have just got to know the players, that's all.

Of all the sports it is my favorite.
MRS. LILLIAN BROWN
St. Johnsbury, Vt.

HORSE RACING: THE DERBY WINNER
Sirs:
Interesting account Whitney Tower wrote on the running of the Flamingo Stakes. But I think he was not entirely right when he said that "last week's Flamingo audience at Hialeah is convinced they've already seen the Derby winner," meaning Bold Ruler. And I'll tell you why.

In the Everglades Stakes, prior to the Flamingo, Bold Ruler took the lead and held it during most of the race. He is very fast out of the gate, which gives him considerable advantage. Nevertheless, Gen. Duke, not as a rule so quick at the start, was able to catch and pass him at the finish. True, Gen. Duke had a 12-pound pull in the weights, but he beat the other horse pretty decisively.

In the Flamingo Stakes, these horses ran an almost identical race, also at a mile and an eighth. Both carried the same weight. Bold Ruler, running behind Federal Hill, took the lead when Arcaro made his move at the far turn; when they hit the stretch Gen. Duke was two lengths away. From there to the finish, he almost made this up, losing by a neck or a head.

The point I want to make is that Gen. Duke gave Bold Ruler a head start in the stretch in both races. He beat him in one, and came mighty near doing it in the other.

It looks very much as if that extra eighth of a mile in the Kentucky Derby is going to be the deciding factor. General Duke may not win the race, but my opinion is that he will beat Bold Ruler.
KENNETH R. PYATT
San Antonio

FOOTBALL HOT STOVE: SUICIDAL QUARTERBACK
Sirs:
With the baseball season almost here and spring practice in full swing, it is us football fans who are in need of a Hot Stove League. Let me start the ball rolling by telling you another football story to top the ones you have recently told in E & D (SI, Jan. 28). I am sure your Herman Hickman will use this one next banquet season.

The great Glenn Dobbs, after an outstanding college and professional career in the U.S., crossed the border into Canada. He became a coach and standout quarterback for the Saskatchewan Rough Riders and was affectionately known in every prairie province as "The Dobber."

In the fall of '51 The Dobber led his team into the East in quest of the Grey Cup. As the game began, The Dobber received an ovation, everyone urging him to show those so-and-so Easterners how to play the game. But it shortly became clear that The Dobber wasn't going to show anyone that day how to play. Nothing went right for him. His passes were intercepted, when he ran he did well to make the line of scrimmage. He even had a kick blocked.

In those days the half was signaled by firing a gun. When the terrible first half was up and the gun boomed out in the awesome stillness, a stricken prairie voice cried out in anguish, "My God, The Dobber shot himself."
ANDREW T. HUNTER, M.D.
Milton, Ont.

FOOTBALL HOT STOVE: SPECIALIZATION
Sirs:
Here's one recently told by George M. Leader, governor of Pennsylvania, to emphasize his point that this is an age of specialization. A sports reporter boarded the train carrying the Notre Dame team down to the Southern Methodist game. Trying to work up a new slant to his color story, this sportswriter got hold of the student manager.

"I understand," he said, "that you carry a chaplain to pray for the team."

"That's right," the student manager replied.

"Well," said the writer, "how about introducing him to me."

"Glad to," was the reply. "Which one do you want, the offensive or defensive chaplain?"
DON CONERY
Chicago

FOOTBALL HOT STOVE: OFF DAY
Sirs:
No doubt you have heard this one, but I think it's funny. Weeb Ewbank's Baltimore Colts were playing San Francisco, and fumbled on their opponent's one-yard line. Moments later a San Francisco back ran a punt back for a touchdown down the sidelines, right in front of the Baltimore bench, where Coach Ewbank was sitting glumly. After the roar died down Ewbank heard a fan yelling at him, "What kind of coach are you anyhow? You let them fumble on the one, and when they run the punt back right in front of you, you miss the tackle."
JACK ADAMS
New York

TRACK & FIELD: THE WOMEN (CONT.)
Sirs:
How interested I was to read Jean Squire's letter concerning the lack of encouragement given to women's track and field sports in America (19TH HOLE, March 4). When I recently emigrated to Canada from England I was prepared to find this sport less popular, but not complete lethargy toward it.

As a British national standard runner and honorary and senior track coach, my interest is obvious, but, believe me, I am not a maniac fanatic to the exclusion of other sports. Being a professional physical education teacher, I have made many sportswomen friends here, and sincerely enthuse with them over their golf and basketball games, skiing, skating and swimming, and spectator sports of baseball, hockey and football.

But is there any excuse for not knowing the name of one track or field representative sent to the Olympic Games from so vast and sporting a country?

I believe the States has the answer with its indoor meets. They are regarded very apprehensively in Britain. I wonder if women's events are ever put on the program.

May I say how I enjoy SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. I have never before come across a magazine offering such lucid information and reports.
JUNE CRUMP
Quebec

•The AAU's National Indoor Senior Women's Track and Field Championships will take place on April 6 at the Cleveland Arena.—ED.