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BALTIMORE ORIOLES

April 15, 1957
April 15, 1957

Table of Contents
April 15, 1957

Doug Ford And The Masters
Events & Discoveries
Scouting Reports
American League
  • Seven times in the past eight years the Yankees have won the pennant; in '56 they could have started to print their World Series tickets in July. Yet Casey Stengel now comes up with a ball club he says is better than any of the others. Unless you are a Yankee fan, it looks like a long season ahead

  • The Indians have been in a second-place rut for five of the past six years. Although most major league cities would happily settle for much less, in Cleveland the frustration of always being the runner-up has come to a head. A new manager has been added, but once again it looks like second best

  • For five straight years the Sox have finished third. Now they have a new manager and some promising rookies but all else is the same: with one hand they must claw their way up toward the Yankees and Indians, with the other hold off the Tigers and Red Sox from below. That's asking too much of two hands

  • The Boston Red Sox are New England's pride and despair. Annually hope rises that this year the Sox will finally unseat those top-dog New York Yankees, and annually there is frustration. But, even so, hope rides high again on such as Ted Williams, Jim Piersail, Tom Brewer and a dozen bright young men

  • This is the team they said last winter might shake up the Yankees—but that was last winter and now no one is quite so sure. The Tigers are good, only there aren't enough of them; where Casey Stengel experiments to find out which player is best, Jack Tighe must experiment to find a player good enough

  • The Baltimore Orioles have improved steadily in their three seasons in the American League. There has been a continuous flow of ballplayers, coming and going, as Manager Paul Richards has tried to field a winning club. This year the team has a more permanent look, but there is still a lot to be done

  • The Senators finished seventh a year ago which, on the record, may have been an even greater miracle than the pennant triumphs of the 1914 Braves and the 1951 Giants. They had the worst fielding in the league and by far the worst pitching. Only a couple of big sluggers saved them from the bottom

  • This will be Kansas City's third season in the major leagues. The first year was one grand party: a lively, eager team fought for victories all year long. But last season was quite different: the team was listless, as well as bad, and finished a dull, dreary last. Kansas City fans expect something a good deal better in 1957

National League
  • The old, old Dodgers have been the class team of the National League for a decade. Cracks have appeared in their armor, but it is fondly hoped in Brooklyn (and Los Angeles) that bright young players will fill such gaps. In the most unlikely event that they do there'll be yet another Yankee-Dodger World Series

  • Now it is next year. With a superb pitching staff built around the great trio of Spahn, Burdette and Buhl, and boasting some of the league's best ballplayers in Aaron, Mathews, Adcock and Logan, the Braves are prepared to make a strong bid for the pennant they missed by the narrowest of margins last September

  • The personable, colorful, lively Redlegs are the most popular ball club in the National League. Last season strong hitting, brilliant fielding, shrewd managing and an astute front office combined to lift them to third place after 11 dismal years buried in the second division. Now they have their eyes on the pennant

  • Improved by trades and boasting one of the most impressive starting lineups in the league, the Cardinals are hungry for a pennant. Yet the bench is weak, their pitching can hardly equal the Dodgers or Braves, and the Redlegs have more power. It may be a long, tough climb from fourth place first

  • It's seven years now since the youthful Philadelphia "Whiz Kids" stole the National League pennant. They have grown old in the interval, and none too gracefully at that. A slowly dwindling band of truly topflight players has heretofore saved the club from utter disgrace, but who knows if they can do it again

  • The Giants looked better toward the end of 1956, moving from the cellar to sixth in the last five weeks of the season. Then the armed forces took regulars Jackie Brandt and Bill White, and regular Catcher Bill Sarni had a heart attack during spring training. Yet despite all the team still shows plenty of spirit

  • Last year the Pirates spent nine glorious and dizzy days atop the National League. This, however, was in June, and at season's end they were seventh. They may not spend even one day in first place in '57, but the Pirates are a young ball club on the way up and they aren't going to finish seventh either

  • After 10 years of bitter frustration in the depths of the second division, Owner Phil Wrigley swept the club clean during the winter and reorganized from front office down. Despite this broom treatment of last year's cellar team, the Cubs' tenure in the bleak second division is assured for another year

Sport In Art
Fame Is For Winners
Figuring It Out
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

BALTIMORE ORIOLES

The Baltimore Orioles have improved steadily in their three seasons in the American League. There has been a continuous flow of ballplayers, coming and going, as Manager Paul Richards has tried to field a winning club. This year the team has a more permanent look, but there is still a lot to be done

THE MANAGEMENT
Executive Vice-President William Walsingham, veteran National League executive, was brought in this year to direct and coordinate front office functions. General Manager-Field Manager Paul Richards will still operate in his dual role but will be relieved of a lot of paper work. Lean and tense, Richards is considered one of the keenest practitioners of baseball strategy. Coaches Al Vincent (first) and Luman Harris (third) handle the bases, while Harry (The Cat) Brecheen directs the Oriole pitchers.

This is an article from the April 15, 1957 issue Original Layout

ANALYSIS OF THIS YEAR'S ORIOLES

STRONG POINTS
Biggest thing going for Orioles is Manager Paul Richards' uncanny knack for getting maximum mileage out of a team comprised mostly of major league castoffs. Under tutoring of Richards and Pitching Coach Harry Brecheen, pitching staff, in some respects a weak spot, could be strong factor in whatever success Orioles achieve this season. These two have been tireless in their efforts to help certain pitchers correct flaws in delivery and perfect new pitches. In George Zuverink, Orioles have one of the better relief pitchers in the league and over a portion of last summer he was best in baseball. Gus Triandos is perhaps second best hitting catcher in league and source of most of the team's power. Bob Nieman, Al Pilarcik and Dick Williams give Orioles strong outfield, offensively and defensively. And a healthy George Kell is strong point for any team because of his poise and sheer class.

WEAK SPOTS
Team, as a whole, is woefully weak in hitting. (Worst in the American League in 1956 batting, runs scored, hits and total bases.) Good power hitter is desperately needed to team up with Gus Triandos. Bench has been improved but there are still too many good glove men who can't hit and bonus babies who have yet to show they belong in majors. A team trying to better itself in the league can not afford to carry a .217 hitting shortstop (Willy Miranda) next to a .231 hitting second baseman (Billy Gardner), no matter how well they field. Despite Richards' admitted genius in handling pitchers, staff still lacks standouts who can go the distance (only 38 complete games pitched last year). It will be same staff—unless one of the rookies comes through—that had only one pitcher (Connie Johnson) with a lower ERA than 4.00. The Orioles would also like to come up with a good hitting catcher to spell Triandos behind plate.

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES
An early dividend from the Orioles' growing farm system could be Third Baseman Brooks Robinson. Originally brought up to spell Kell at third, he may force that veteran to move to first. A finished fielder after only two years in the minors, Robinson has been hitting consistently all through spring training. Another product of farm system, Charlie Beamon, could add some needed youth to pitching staff. Throwing good sinker, slider and fast ball, Beamon made dramatic entry into league late last September when he shut out the Yankees 1-0 and spoiled Whitey Ford's chances to win 20 games. Al Pilarcik, obtained in trade with Kansas City, will probably start in right field. A good fielder with strong arm, Pilarcik will add punch to powerless lineup. Smooth-fielding Jim Brideweser, purchased from Detroit this spring, adds depth to infield but no extra batting strength. The original bonus baby of Orioles, Bill O'Dell, returns after two years in service to prove that $40,000 he received for signing was no mistake. He has looked impressive on mound this spring. Other rookies with good chance of sticking are Outfielder Carl Powis and Catcher Tommy Patton.

THE BIG IFS
A strong, season-long performance by aging but still stylish George Kell is vital to Orioles if they are to retain grip on sixth place and, possibly, move closer to log jam of clubs between them and Yankees. If Kell proves sound, if young Brooks Robinson can hit major league pitching, if Pitcher Don Ferrarese learns control and Charlie Beamon's bright promise is fulfilled, if First Baseman Bob Boyd's arm troubles are over and Pilarcik hits up to expectations, team will have as cheerful a season as it's possible for an improving second-division club to have.

OUTLOOK
As Orioles stand now, they are not yet ready to move into the pack fighting for four spots below Yankees—unless one of those four suffers an unexpected relapse. Club's main concern is to continue developing fresh talent for future without dropping in standings. Farm system has already begun to produce (Robinson, Beamon, Tito Francona), and other classy youngsters (Ron Hansen, Gary Walker, Lennie Green) are only a year or two away. Richards is thus in position of having improved team without much chance of finishing higher.

SPECTATOR'S GUIDE

Looks more like football bowl than ball park. Outfield walls are devoid of advertising. Rest rooms are clean and there is waiting only on capacity days. Fans must go to refreshment counters for beer, since city law prohibits sale in stands. Since the round trip consumes about a half inning, a hungry Baltimore fan sometimes has difficult decision to make. Pizzas and crab cakes are specialties.

No. 3 bus takes you from downtown to the ball park—located in an attractive north Baltimore residential section—in 20 minutes for 20¢. Figure on 10 to 15 minutes by car. Parking costs 25¢ on private lots surrounding stadium and is free (except for 25¢ "tip" to "parker") on city lot across the street. Over-all, there is room for 5,500 cars. Beat the usual last-minute Baltimore rush by arriving at least 15 minutes early. It takes about 20 minutes to get out of area by car.

Favorite spot to sit is upper deck with its added five-mile view of Baltimore, if you don't mind long climb and long-range view of diamond. Dress warmly for early-spring and late-season games though, because it gets cool up there. For sun, sit on east side of stadium. If you want comfort, the only seats with backs are in lower deck from home plate to both foul lines. Watch out for thick, round poles blocking your view above 25th row in lower stands.

View this article in the original magazine

PHOTOAL PILARCIKPHOTODICK WILLIAMSPHOTOGEORGE ZUVERINKPHOTOBOB NIEMANPHOTORAY MOOREPHOTOGEORGE KELLPHOTOWILLY MIRANDAPHOTOBILLY GARDNERPHOTOFRONT OFFICE: Wm. WalsinghamPHOTOMANAGER: Paul RichardsPHOTOTITO FRANCONAPHOTOBOB BOYDPHOTOGUS TRIANDOSPHOTODON FERRARESEILLUSTRATIONILLUSTRATIONMEMORIAL STADIUM
Capacity 47,778
Ticket information: CHesapeake 3-9800
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BASIC ROSTER

no.

player

position

1956 record

1

Bob Boyd

1B

.311

2

Al Pilarcik

OF

.251

3

George Kell

3B

.271

4

Bob Nieman

OF

.320

7

Willy Miranda

SS

.217

9

Billy Gardner

2B

.231

11

Gus Triandos

C

.279

22

Joe Ginsberg

C

.224

23

Dick Williams

OF

.286

34

Brooks Robinson

3B

minors

40

Jim Brideweser

SS

.215

44

Tito Francona

OF-1B

.258

17

Bill Wight

P

9-12

18

Billy Loes

P

2-7

27

Charlie Beamon

P

minors

28

Hector Brown

P

9-7

29

Ray Moore

P

12-7

35

George Zuverink

P

7-6

36

Connie Johnson

P

9-11

39

Don Ferrarese

P

4-10

PAST PERFORMANCE CHART

TEAM

year

finished

won

lost

games behind

1956

6

69

85

28

1955

7

57

97

39

1954

7

54

100

57

1953

8

54

100

46½

1952

7

64

90

31

INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

batting

pitching

1956

Nieman

.320

Moore

12-7

1955

Philley

.299

Wilson

12-18

1954

Abrams

.293

Turley

14-15

1953

Wertz

.268

Larsen

7-12

1952

Nieman

.289

Cain

12-10

home runs

runs batted in

1956

Triandos

21

Triandos

88

1955

Triandos

12

Triandos

65

1954

Stephens

8

Stephens

46

1953

Wertz

19

Wertz

70

1952

Nieman

18

Nieman

74