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PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

April 15, 1957
April 15, 1957

Table of Contents
April 15, 1957

Doug Ford And The Masters
Events & Discoveries
Scouting Reports
American League
  • Seven times in the past eight years the Yankees have won the pennant; in '56 they could have started to print their World Series tickets in July. Yet Casey Stengel now comes up with a ball club he says is better than any of the others. Unless you are a Yankee fan, it looks like a long season ahead

  • The Indians have been in a second-place rut for five of the past six years. Although most major league cities would happily settle for much less, in Cleveland the frustration of always being the runner-up has come to a head. A new manager has been added, but once again it looks like second best

  • For five straight years the Sox have finished third. Now they have a new manager and some promising rookies but all else is the same: with one hand they must claw their way up toward the Yankees and Indians, with the other hold off the Tigers and Red Sox from below. That's asking too much of two hands

  • The Boston Red Sox are New England's pride and despair. Annually hope rises that this year the Sox will finally unseat those top-dog New York Yankees, and annually there is frustration. But, even so, hope rides high again on such as Ted Williams, Jim Piersail, Tom Brewer and a dozen bright young men

  • This is the team they said last winter might shake up the Yankees—but that was last winter and now no one is quite so sure. The Tigers are good, only there aren't enough of them; where Casey Stengel experiments to find out which player is best, Jack Tighe must experiment to find a player good enough

  • The Baltimore Orioles have improved steadily in their three seasons in the American League. There has been a continuous flow of ballplayers, coming and going, as Manager Paul Richards has tried to field a winning club. This year the team has a more permanent look, but there is still a lot to be done

  • The Senators finished seventh a year ago which, on the record, may have been an even greater miracle than the pennant triumphs of the 1914 Braves and the 1951 Giants. They had the worst fielding in the league and by far the worst pitching. Only a couple of big sluggers saved them from the bottom

  • This will be Kansas City's third season in the major leagues. The first year was one grand party: a lively, eager team fought for victories all year long. But last season was quite different: the team was listless, as well as bad, and finished a dull, dreary last. Kansas City fans expect something a good deal better in 1957

National League
  • The old, old Dodgers have been the class team of the National League for a decade. Cracks have appeared in their armor, but it is fondly hoped in Brooklyn (and Los Angeles) that bright young players will fill such gaps. In the most unlikely event that they do there'll be yet another Yankee-Dodger World Series

  • Now it is next year. With a superb pitching staff built around the great trio of Spahn, Burdette and Buhl, and boasting some of the league's best ballplayers in Aaron, Mathews, Adcock and Logan, the Braves are prepared to make a strong bid for the pennant they missed by the narrowest of margins last September

  • The personable, colorful, lively Redlegs are the most popular ball club in the National League. Last season strong hitting, brilliant fielding, shrewd managing and an astute front office combined to lift them to third place after 11 dismal years buried in the second division. Now they have their eyes on the pennant

  • Improved by trades and boasting one of the most impressive starting lineups in the league, the Cardinals are hungry for a pennant. Yet the bench is weak, their pitching can hardly equal the Dodgers or Braves, and the Redlegs have more power. It may be a long, tough climb from fourth place first

  • It's seven years now since the youthful Philadelphia "Whiz Kids" stole the National League pennant. They have grown old in the interval, and none too gracefully at that. A slowly dwindling band of truly topflight players has heretofore saved the club from utter disgrace, but who knows if they can do it again

  • The Giants looked better toward the end of 1956, moving from the cellar to sixth in the last five weeks of the season. Then the armed forces took regulars Jackie Brandt and Bill White, and regular Catcher Bill Sarni had a heart attack during spring training. Yet despite all the team still shows plenty of spirit

  • Last year the Pirates spent nine glorious and dizzy days atop the National League. This, however, was in June, and at season's end they were seventh. They may not spend even one day in first place in '57, but the Pirates are a young ball club on the way up and they aren't going to finish seventh either

  • After 10 years of bitter frustration in the depths of the second division, Owner Phil Wrigley swept the club clean during the winter and reorganized from front office down. Despite this broom treatment of last year's cellar team, the Cubs' tenure in the bleak second division is assured for another year

Sport In Art
Fame Is For Winners
Figuring It Out
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

It's seven years now since the youthful Philadelphia "Whiz Kids" stole the National League pennant. They have grown old in the interval, and none too gracefully at that. A slowly dwindling band of truly topflight players has heretofore saved the club from utter disgrace, but who knows if they can do it again

THE MANAGEMENT
Tough, aggressive Roy Harney came into the Philly front office after terms with the lowly Pirates and the lofty Yanks. His manager, Mayo Smith, had a brief major league career as an outfielder but was a distinguished minor league manager in the Yankee chain. Last season's catcher, Andy Seminick, coaches at first, Wally Moses at third, Whit Wyatt the pitchers. Maje McDonnell is the batting practice pitcher. Fat, jovial Benny Bengough, best-liked man in baseball, handles bullpen chores.

This is an article from the April 15, 1957 issue Original Layout

ANALYSIS OF THIS YEAR'S PHILLIES

STRONG POINTS
Phillies have three good starting pitchers. Robin Roberts had a truly miserable season last year, and yet won 19 games. Curt Simmons (15-10) made courageous comeback at time when the Philly management said flatly that it was not counting on him to win a game. Little Harvey Haddix (13-8) is still one of better left-handers around today. Then there is Catcher Stan Lopata, who spent long, long apprenticeship before developing at 30 into one of best ballplayers in league. Lopata is good catcher and strong hitter, despite curious crouch he uses while batting. He means a lot to Phils and was their most valuable player last season. Center Fielder Richie Ashburn has batted over .300 in six of past seven seasons and, despite presence in league of such great outfielders as Willie Mays, Duke Snider, Billy Bruton and Gus Bell, has caught more fly balls than anybody else in seven of past eight seasons, a remarkable record. Rival National League clubs, irritated by the Phils' reluctance to trade Ashburn, may ponder these figures. For the rest, fans can expect dependable if not spectacular performances from such as Third Baseman Willie Jones, Left Fielder Rip Repulski and Second Baseman Ted Kazanski.

WEAK SPOTS
There is a terrible situation at shortstop, where Phils once were solid because of Granny Hamner. But Hamner is semicrippled by arm injury that keeps him from swinging bat properly; he can no longer play short and is trying comeback as pitcher. Ted Kazanski can play shortstop, but Mayo Smith wisely prefers to keep Kazanski at key second base spot, which used to be as irritating a problem as short is now. Veteran Bobby Morgan just can't play shortstop. Veteran Solly Hemus can, but he depends more on spirit and intelligence than pure skill, and it doesn't always work. Veteran Roy Smalley should be able to do it, but Roy is an erratic, inconsistent ballplayer. By default job may end up in hands of Rookie John Kennedy, whom Phils obtained from Kansas City Monarchs and who could become first Negro to play major league ball with Phils. There are weak spots, too, in right field (where four or five candidates took turns in training) and at first base (though Rookie Ed Bouchee is being counted on heavily). Phils' weakest points, however, are bench reserves and, oddly enough, pitching behind the three big starters (the secondary starters and relievers are, most of them, pretty bad).

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES
Several good-looking young minor league pitchers received careful appraisal in spring training, and one or more may move on to roster. But rookies being definitely counted on are Shortstop Kennedy and First Baseman Bouchee. Kennedy is agile fielder and sharp right-handed hitter, who appears to be at his best when he's under pressure. The left-handed Bouchee is beefy and slow moving, but he can hit a baseball several miles. Unhappily, he is not a real pull hitter and a lot of his long drives will be caught in distant right center field. Repulski, who came from Cardinals in exchange for Del Ennis, is a streaky hitter; the Phils hope he'll avoid slumps this year and streak all season. Jim Hearn, purchased from Giants, is counted on to deepen pitching.

THE BIG IFS
Rookie Bouchee must come through at first base and Rookie Kennedy at short, if Phils are to make progress this" season. Repulski has to prove to a lot of doubting Thomases that he is a better ballplayer than the departed Ennis. Robin Roberts has to regain the perfection of his pre-1956 form, and second-line and bullpen pitching must improve.

OUTLOOK
Most of the clubs in the National League this year are maturing, improving, looking to their young players to develop steadily into stars who will carry the club into the first division or to the top and a pennant. The Phils, on the other hand, are fighting desperately to stay even, to hold onto their respectable but slightly run-down place in the standings, through the efforts of veteran players. Perhaps in the near future the Philadelphia front office will harvest another crop of Whiz Kids, but it almost certainly won't happen in 1957.

SPECTATOR'S GUIDE

Double-decked stands and bleachers enclose three-fourths of field. Except for boxes, most seats have at least minor obstructions between you and the game. Management recognizes this, however, and reserved seats especially bad in this respect are held back, except on sellouts when buyer is told it's a "poor visibility seat." Only sun seats in Connie Mack Stadium are in left field bleachers.

Park is clean, brightly painted (box seats red, others pale pink). Tipping ushers is "optional." Rest rooms are clean and modern, but not enough of them for big crowds. Plenty of drinking fountains, good vendor service, easily accessible refreshment counters (specialty is box lunch with fried chicken). No beer is sold. Lack of beer in park prompts some Philly fans to bring their own in, and they usually bring plenty. Last season this resulted in at least one near-riot when irate spectators (for some strange reason, sedate Philadelphia has the rowdiest clientele in major leagues, as any rabbit-eared player will testify) started to pitch empty bottles down on field.

Avoid driving, since the available parking space is very limited. Best idea is to cab out from downtown; or take the subway to Broad and Lehigh, then bus or walk the seven remaining blocks to park. North Philly Station of Pennsylvania Railroad is close by, too.

View this article in the original magazine

PHOTOFRONT OFFICE: Roy HameyPHOTOMANAGER: Mayo SmithPHOTORIP REPULSKIPHOTORICHIE ASHBURNPHOTOSTAN LOPATAPHOTOGRANNY HAMNERPHOTOMARV BLAYLOCKPHOTOROBIN ROBERTSPHOTOTED KAZANSKIPHOTOCURT SIMMONSPHOTOHARVEY HADDIXPHOTOED BOUCHEEPHOTOJIM HEARNPHOTOWILLIE JONESILLUSTRATIONCONNIE MACK STADIUM
Capacity 33,359
Ticket information: BAIdwin 9-9200
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ILLUSTRATION

BASIC ROSTER

no.

player

position

1956 record

1

Richie Ashburn

CF

.303

2

Granny Hamner

SS-P

.224

4

Solly Hemus

IF

.286

6

Willie Jones

3B

.277

7

Ted Kazanski

2B

.211

10

Ed Bouchee

1B

minors

12

Marv Blaylock

1B-OF

.254

14

Rip Repulski

LF

.277

15

Elmer Valo

OF

.289

16

Frank Baumholtz

OF

.270

29

Stan Lopata

C

.267

47

Bobby Morgan

IF

.196

48

Harry Anderson

OF

minors

19

Bob Miller

P

3-6

20

Harvey Haddix

P

13-8

22

Jim Hearn

P

5-11

26

Saul Rogovin

P

7-6

28

Curt Simmons

P

15-10

36

Robin Roberts

P

19-18

42

Jack Meyer

P

7-11

PAST PERFORMANCE CHART

TEAM

year

finished

won

lost

games behind

1956

5

71

83

22

1955

4

77

77

21½

1954

4

75

79

22

1953

3

83

71

22

1952

4

87

67

INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

batting

pitching

1956

Ashburn

.303

Simmons

15-10

1955

Ashburn

.338

Roberts

23-14

1954

Ashburn

.313

Roberts

23-15

1953

Ashburn

.330

Roberts

23-16

1952

Ennis

.289

Roberts

28-7

home runs

runs batted in

1956

Lopata

32

Ennis-Lopata

95

1955

Ennis

29

Ennis

120

1954

Ennis

25

Ennis

119

1953

Ennis

29

Ennis

125

1952

Ennis

20

Ennis

107