Foul Weather and Fair

May 12, 1957

These hardy sailors are dressed for the foulest weather likely to be found from Long Island Sound to Puget before another frostbiting season. Take, for instance, the jackets, to the left, worn by John Meade and Mrs. Bernard Havens of Rye, N.Y. They're waterproof, windproof, colorproof and, thanks to the buoyancy of the Insulair lining, practically sinkproof ($37.50 for man's, $31.50 for woman's, U.S. Rubber). And Mr. and Mrs. William Crow, below, also of Rye, are back from a sail in new protective hooded rain suits, designed by well-known City Island Sailmaker Charles Ulmer—yellow for women, blue for men, of lightweight nylon, lined with rubber, and absolutely waterproof ($28.50 each). Their sailing mates are as well protected: daughter Barbie Crow and friend Tommy Havens wear slicker-type rain suits imported from Norway—bright red and bright yellow ($12.95 and $11.95, The Crow's Nest, New York).

Good sailors are Dick White's Viyella "Salty" shirt ($14.50, Hathaway) and striped sailcloth shorts ($8, White Stag-Bantamac); Dione Lilly's sailcloth jacket and calfskinner pants ($11 and $6, White Stag).

White duck sailing shorts have reinforced seat ($9, Florence Walsh), are worn with a brushed cotton turtle-neck shirt ($3, Duofold) at Nichols Yacht Yard by Betty Morton of Rye.

French Tam of linen with streamers and pompon ($2, Vera) tops Nan Ahearn's outfit of turtle-neck shirt, described above, and blue-banded white duck shorts ($6, Fleischman).

PHOTOTOM PALUMBONORMA HAVENS WEARS "SWEAT SUIT" UNDER JACKET ($13, KORET) FOUR PHOTOSTOM PALUMBO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)