The Question: As a parent, do you think Little League baseball is too competitive?

June 02, 1957

MRS. THOMAS H. LEVERING
Wife of the mayor of Williamsport, Pa.
Generally, no, though it can be in some cases where a boy needs more time than other boys for studies or other activities. My husband and I are delighted that our city is the headquarters for the Little Leagues. We have never been hosts to a finer group of boys and their parents.

RAYMOND B. STEFANO
Utica, N.Y.
Salesman
Absolutely not. It's the greatest program there is for these kids. Even though they are young, competition does them a great deal of good. I can see it with my own boys. If New York City had this program to supplement the work of the Police Athletic League, there'd be less juvenile delinquency.

MRS. ALFRED T. LEE
Freeport, N.Y.
No. We can't keep our boys still. They would be just as active in things like hitching on trucks and other exciting activities. In Little League baseball the boys have a real purpose and excellent direction at an age when they should learn sportsmanship. A real purpose is important to a growing boy.

PAUL LAVALLE
Wilton, Conn.
Leader of Band of America
I haven't found it that way. It's competitive, but not too much. Had this competition interfered with my son's other activities, I would have stopped it. Actually, it was a diversion from his studies and helped him do his school work better. And he still has time to play the clarinet.

DR. DAVID E. COHEN
Westerly, R.I.
Optometrist
No. This is competition on the best possible level. My boy was a Little Leaguer for three years. Not only did it teach him sportsmanship, but it showed him that there is such a thing as service to the community. He saw adults rendering services on a voluntary basis. This impressed him.

MRS. LAWRENCE A. BACON
Worcester, Mass.
On the contrary, Little League competition, intense as it is, is good for boys. That's the American way. America is all competition and was built on competition. Boys learn it young. When they become older they already know what keen competition is and find it easier to make their way in life.

DR. CREIGHTON J. HALE
Director of Research
Little Leagues
Research by the Little League and various universities proves that Little League competition has no detrimental effect. Pennsylvania State University conducted the most recent study, which included the boys who won the 1955 World Series. These champions were shown to have broader interests, were the best liked, scored higher in traits of cooperation, friendliness, integrity, leadership and critical thinking.

LES LONERGAN
Pittsburgh
Sales representative
No. Everyone has a favorite activity. There is nothing harmful with baseball being the favorite activity of many boys. They love competition and live baseball. It's good for every community because a Little League becomes a community project. It makes neighbors out of strangers.

MRS. MARVIN BRADFORD
San Antonio
I'm a grandparent and I think it has a wholesome effect on boys. Kids get wound up in anything they play. In San Antonio, recreation is well balanced. Baseball is the first interest, but children engage in other sports because our climate is ideal for outdoor recreation the year round.

C. G. JAKOPEC
Brookfield, Ill.
Pyrometer reader
Not for the boys. The losers naturally feel bad, but two hours later, when you see I winners and losers together, you can't pick losers from winners. But one look at the parents and you know the losers. Little League competition is too competitive for parents who really brood when their sons lose.

ELEVEN PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)