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NEW FACES, NEW FIGURES

July 01, 1957
July 01, 1957

Table of Contents
July 1, 1957

Baseball X-Ray
Acknowledgments
Coming Events
Events & Discoveries
Downwind To Hawaii
Water Jewels

NEW FACES, NEW FIGURES

BASEBALL REVEALS PROFITS AND LOSSES

As Von McDanielwas demonstrating at Busch Stadium in St. Louis last week the irresistiblemagic that gives baseball its unique place in the affections of the nation, thegame itself was facing up to the hard facts of life in another arena: aCongressional hearing room in Washington.

There baseball'sprotagonist was no gangling 18-year-old, but a tall, gray, angular man,baseball's Commissioner Ford Frick. Boy and man had one thing in common: bothwere pitching as carefully as they knew how.

Mr. Frick was theweek's principal witness before the House subcommittee investigating baseball'sstatus under the antitrust laws. His generally skillful performance washighlighted by the revelation (a thing traditionally hateful to club owners) ofmore or less exact figures on baseball's profits and losses over the past fiveyears. The financial charts (reprinted in full on pages 14 and 15) provided asmany opportunities for fascinating pencil-chewing as a crossword puzzle.

But even withoutpencil in hand, several hitherto unverifiable truths jumped from the pages.Samples:

1) The Brooklynball club, which has complained most bitterly of non-support and an inadequateball park, never failed to make a tidy profit over the five-year period. It wasthe only National League club to do so.

2) With itsbandbox ball park, the Dodgers made $487,462 last season. With a ball parktwice the size of Ebbets Field, the New York Yankees netted only $301,483.

3) Pittsburghlost more money ($1,537,303) than anybody.

4) The WashingtonSenators, although always in the second division, did not have a money-losingseason over the five-year period.

5) Total profitsfor major league baseball, the National and American leagues combined, amountedto $1,878,993 since 1952.

This last item,comparatively modest, would appear to support the classic definition ofbaseball's real status by Phil Wrigley, owner of the Chicago Cubs. He said:"Baseball is too much of a sport to be a business and too much of abusiness to be a sport."

Another aspect ofthe financial charts that appeared to support baseball's claim to innocence inthe ways of big business was an over-all impression that the clubs favored asystem of horse-and-buggy bookkeeping. Even a statistical ignoramus could nothelp feeling that when an item puzzled the club operators, they buried it undera heading marked "Other" and promptly forgot about it.

Against thissuspicion, however, had to be measured the dazzling performances of individualbaseball men, some of which would bear comparison with the intricate footworkof the ablest of modern corporation raiders. One of these brought up at thehearing was the complicated deal involving Yankee Stadium. It was touched on inthese questions by subcommittee counsel and answers by Commissioner Frick:

Q. Mr.Commissioner, are you familiar with the series of transactions by which theownership of Yankee Stadium was transferred by the Yew York Yankees tofinancier Arnold Johnson [present owner of the Kansas City A's] and then to theKnights of Columbus at a total capital gain profit to the Yankees of severalmillions of dollars?

A. I am familiarwith it, yes.

Q. Could yousummarize those transactions?

A. I couldn't,no. I don't have the figures in front of me. I know what happened. I know therewas a sale of real estate and then a sale of the stadium.

Q. Then, as Iunderstand it, Mr. Johnson leased the stadium back from the Knights of Columbusand then leased it from himself to the New York Yankees?

A. Yes, and hassince sold it.

Q. Under thatarrangement, Mr. Johnson retained interest in the grounds and in the stadiumand also remained a debtor of the Yankees.... Do you know whether Mr. Johnsonpaid off the $2,900,000 debt that he owed to the owners of the Yankees?

A. I know thatMr. Johnson disposed of his interest in the stadium. Whether he got cash forthat, I don't know.

Q. As Iunderstand the transaction, part of the $6.5 million purchase price which hepaid for Yankee Stadium, was paid by a $2,900,000 note which he gave to Messrs.Webb and Topping, with a purchase money mortgage on the property, and you donot know whether he still owes that money? Is that correct?

A. I don't knowhow it was handled.

So it went, untilsomebody must have thought this was a far, far cry from the game that the boy,Von McDaniel, was playing out in St. Louis. Commissioner Frick as much as saidso. The committee counsel was talking, he suggested, not baseball, but realestate.

On the surface,last week's hearings looked like a revival of an old show which had played thesame boards in 1951. Then, a long, drawn-out inquiry led to no definiteconclusions. Now, the same cast had come back, headed by the same subcommitteechairman, Congressman Emanuel Celler of Brooklyn, who was better known for hisbasketball playing than his baseball at Columbia College 50 years ago.

But in most otherrespects, this was a new production with some wholly new dramatic ingredients.For one thing, a recent Supreme Court decision had tacitly invited Congress toconsider baseball legislation. Furthermore, baseball was almost certainly goingnational with the proposed shift of the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New YorkGiants to California. Finally, television, merely an interesting newdevelopment in 1951, was now (as the figures on the following pages show) thesine qua non of the game.

[This articlecontains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

DOWN BY DER GRAVOIS

After Friday night's game with the Brooklyn Dodgers,the city of St. Louis was broiling under its first acute attack of pennantfever in eight years. Everyone, from the budding industrialists in the RacquetClub on Kingshighway to the braumeisters down by der Gravois, was talking aboutthe Cardinals and their Von McDaniel, a rugged right-handed pitcher from acotton farm near the dusty little town of Hollis, Okla. Only 18, Von was just amonth out of high school, yet on Friday night he had shut out the Dodgers 2-0,allowing but a pair of scratch hits. Adding that to two earlier appearances inrelief, Von has now pitched 17 scoreless innings.

Von is the younger brother of 21-year-old LindyMcDaniel, the ace of this year's Cardinal pitching staff. In its excitement St.Louis could not avoid comparing these reticent and religious farm boys with amore raucous brother act of a generation ago—Dizzy and Paul Dean, who betweenthem won 49 league games in 1934. The parallel ends there, however, for Von andLindy are devout members of the Church of Christ, total abstainers who refuseto take their work lightly. Just before the Dodger game someone asked Von if hehad butterflies in his stomach. "Well, now, I'll tell you," came theanswer. "They may be down there, but I don't feel them. If I'm going to getnervous, I might as well go home and tend a grocery store."—W.B.

BIG LEAGUE BALANCE CHART

  

INCOME

EXPENSES

TEAM

YR.

HOME

AWAY

RADIO-TV

CONCESSIONS

OTHER

SALARIES

BONUSES

PLAYERS* PUR.-SOLD

OFFICERS' SALARIES

FARM* CLUBS

TAXES

DIVIDENDS

OTHER

NET PROFIT OR LOSS

AMERICAN LEAGUE

BALT. Left St. L. after '53

'52

$540,090

$252,662

$8,935

$93,034

$105,110

$350,810

none

($83,950)

$77,800

$55,280

none

none

$ 929,528

$329,637

'53

358,789

175,472

55,557

64,274

92,400

396,510

none

(24,651)

70,250

65,732

none

none

945,649

706,998

'54

1,572,143

176,788

312,795

242,568

108,555

386,216

7,500

176,950

17,667

61,681

10,493

none

1,108,935

643,407

'55

1,280,782

187,652

301,276

234,876

98,859

472,193

45,000

124,850

27,297

85,604

none

none

1,435,216

86,715

'56

1,277,613

194,334

301,630

239,132

99,385

475,276

47,738

160,000

12,452

125,300

4,669

none

1,217,352

69,307

BOS.

'52

1,251,288

328,009

366,500

176,673

179,017

413,029

5,000

96,800

50,000

159,117

none

none

1,919,555

342,014

'53

1,153,121

238,043

369,900

164,844

160,301

410,854

19,000

(40,600)

50,000

148,012

none

none

1,920,219

421,276

'54

1,286,542

308,696

360,965

162,814

220,047

450,796

30,000

(71,500)

50,000

124,273

none

none

1,752,409

3,086

'55

1,626,256

355,725

476,870

205,855

178,235

435,220

30,000

(4,000)

50,000

182,708

none

none

1,906,112

242,901

'56

1,610,291

321,654

477,300

215,477

175,319

428,822

57,500

55,250

50,000

154,190

none

none

1,932,247

122,032

CHI.

'52

1,135,625

247,562

261,202

287,844

276,029

324,464

6,000

290,700

83,250

191,161

96,958

none

1,150,677

65,052

'53

1,319,938

292,740

355,925

316,331

269,315

374,342

30,000

252,100

79,568

133,092

257,657

74,500

1,222,770

204,720

'54

1,499,484

304,028

434,185

325,841

308,129

427,659

22,000

220,600

196,126

150,245

247,367

none

1,404,773

202,897

'55

1,446,222

372,310

522,491

349,381

336,777

428,135

24,300

309,300

184,637

141,030

239,721

none

1,444,427

201,631

'56

1,305,125

306,847

518,992

287,690

283,404

496,061

16,900

105,250

140,092

126,654

190,000

7,450

1,486,012

141,089

CLEVE.

'52

1,806,810

394,799

452,650

139,981

169,241

523,934

193,018

117,500

167,567

25,983

163,880

none

1,619,477

204,088

'53

1,428,097

347,244

614,582

104,386

113,017

555,915

164,944

20,000

151,443

14,291

197,624

3,000

1,345,821

157,288

'54

1,766,655

426,083

635,762

125,581

328,724

592,660

137,510

(37,500)

171,420

117,482

560,509

15,000

1,392,405

583,283

'55

1,687,805

436,262

567,891

127,486

139,471

648,218

143,872

(74,500)

158,096

169,817

322,700

12,780

1,500,956

89,756

'56

1,326,214

336,400

1,053,171

90,491

189,101

557,172

219,804

21,000

143,408

41,008

none

none

2,180,095

167,110

DET.

'52

FIGURES INCOMPLETE

   

26,265

'53

   

43,639

'54

28,107

  

86,465

'55

272,771

  

257,191

'56

86,513

  

81,591

K.C. Left Phil. after '54

'52

648,420

257,355

168,595

235,696

226,835

387,758

19,900

31,201

70,000

40,089

none

none

1,039,390

51,437

'53

387,181

202,667

292,850

232,776

203,719

392,097

none

(8,000)

70,000

31,474

none

none

936,083

102,461

'54

345,634

187,936

300,035

191,117

175,938

357,329

none

(22,500)

64,583

127,688

none

none

891,496

217,936

'55

2,214,445

198,218

210,000

242,589

136,233

375,457

10,000

419,100

64,063

(9,705)

8,591

none

2,105,765

28,214

'56

1,702,959

183,415

210,000

200,233

200,883

345,257

none

189,500

67,500

none

709

none

1,892,867

1,657

N.Y.

'52

2,213,876

429,206

475,000

441,512

437,071

561,420

none

128,000

270,100

244,091

462,450

none

2,106,661

223,943

'53

2,142,908

390,501

625,000

420,756

545,909

617,144

none

27,000

258,449

(8,071)

364,778

none

2,243,589

622,185

'54

2,525,339

475,137

675,000

397,843

431,517

674,622

2,200

(85,200)

127,933

253,261

326,524

none

3,030,620

174,876

'55

2,528,718

490,450

725,000

487,081

667,416

629,995

29,000

(2,500)

142,500

195,536

680,801

none

3,101,481

121,852

56

2,606,689

498,830

900,000

495,557

516,018

680,679

2,650

118,500

143,750

240,420

562,008

none

2,967,604

301,483

WASH

52

638,065

252,361

169,905

142,554

190,412

341,974

11,771

33,490

67,500

170,653

51,870

58,200

657,568

58,471

'53

565,718

192,694

282,572

111,162

200,246

339,267

10,332

13,465)

69,400

203,989

17,321

38,200

698,941

26,607

'54

643,011

202,044

341,186

97,994

189,676

376,971

23,606

29,055

86,550

126,735

41,474

18,925

740,630

48,890

'55

534,882

238,526

316,851

94,385

198,638

387,282

20,734

(52,000)

89,185

126,045

1,988

18,925

805,826

4,222

'56

564,610

207,457

316,640

115,617

207,947

316,975

20,785

(19,140)

74,000

130,792

13,189

none

852,452

23,218

NATIONAL LEAGUE

BKN.

'52

1,398,803

309,449

580,227

239,121

306,363

505,139

none

3,000

86,250

301,431

227,157

none

1,264,884

446,102

53

1,524,754

331,952

539,610

272,712

340,354

526,660

none

(46,000)

82,917

420,762

66,261

none

1,668,776

290,006

'54

1,464,840

444,635

609,490

240,135

57,489

570,707

7,000

(171,000)

102,500

321,009

245,417

none

1,530,977

209,979

'55

1,549,062

444,649

787,155

272,812

447,446

559,097

3,500

7,500

110,617

459,998

397,756

none

1,535,461

427,195

'56

1,790,275

430,797

888,270

315,407

456,075

598,666

5,500

(8,000)

111,200

376,260

632,791

none

1,676,945

487,462

CHI.

52

1,078,106

145,477

166,027

302,836

135,750

331,109

100,228

66,439

38,500

35,466

32,303

none

1,069,358

154,793

'53

811,323

175,184

153,300

242,962

115,198

425,072

60,915

171,428

39,000

215,978

none

none

1,003,937

418,363

54

803,149

228,779

156,078

308,715

75,506

449,024

82,970

34,984

38,208

55,709

none

none

983,346

72,014

'55

953,123

247,362

186,975

336,349

67,321

398,119

93,321

102,572

45,500

(5,029)

14,000

none

1,073,963

68,684

'56

793,859

245,986

226,603

283,444

97,101

380,752

122,304

113,709

56,000

48,783

none

none

1,085,157

159,712

CIN.

'52

694,041

145,536

109,054

104,761

70,853

312,010

INCLUDED IN SALARIES

(750)

31,600

33,662

none

14,270

816,091

68,368

'53

669,764

185,897

119,470

107,351

81,414

293,841

(25,000)

37,685

(52,704)

2,144

14,270

892,412

15,518

'54

911,814

186,178

120.130

144,354

79,915

325,318

(67,500)

48,288

36,329

51,265

24,770

1,024,493

24,198

'55

931,789

209,519

197,380

141,638

79,338

382,074

10,000

44,870

882

45,858

30,770

1,022,835

53,145

'56

1,488,568

303,566

267,275

234,599

121,629

441,355

148,250

94,326

(38,522)

230,949

60,770

1,238,063

301,216

MIL. Left Bos. after '52

'52

312,069

150,143

316,324

43,338

111,200

333,251

none

(78,100)

20,000

217,911

none

none

899,111

459,099

'53

2,218,506

215,565

141,200

425,549

73,378

372,998

154,059

328,000

54,000

57,633

39,291

none

1,430,419

637,798

'54

2,476,374

280,724

136,500

548,005

68,435

401,505

165,300

123,300

54,000

223,322

502,629

none

1,582,872

457,110

'55

2,556,410

251,846

135,000

510,948

106,575

448,466

185,389

(350)

66,737

179,383

282,130

none

1,591,629

807,395

'56

2,603,354

342,443

125,000

542,406

83,864

469,924

148,952

97,900

93,500

205,227

629,179

none

1,637,987

414,398

N.Y.

'52

1,269,875

222,877

379,562

262,909

275,499

565,644

1,000

136,000

111,458

33,290

none

none

1,785,674

222,344

'53

1,081,834

230,493

424,241

236,542

330,931

573,624

5,000

29,250

110,000

3,863

none

none

1,645,611

63,307

'54

1,500,289

335,479

490,192

309,353

497,023

518,208

20,667

(10,433)

117,812

11,283

250,059

70,506

1,829,015

395,725

'55

1,255,839

329,689

645,640

245,769

392,486

588,429

36,000

99,833

140,312

(36,679)

98,710

47,004

1,791,705

151,113

'56

1,008,183

300,326

730,593

196,141

236,529

530,540

12,383

(41,117)

142,500

(62,530)

39,721

none

1,768,860

81,415

PHIL.

'52

898,970

146,844

178,333

70,047

110,166

353,320

IN OTHER FIGURES

(34,700)

14,800

257,391

none

none

931,578

118,029

'53

1,049,231

198,411

225,920

79,031

108,936

353,463

104,400

14,800

152,829

none

none

1,046,725

10,688

'54

945,428

258,533

203,865

69,525

131,352

375,677

202,124

39,367

139,851

none

none

1,107,990

256,306

'55

1,230,819

208,175

266,055

162,822

231,940

406,819

93,938

13,700

184,390

6,832

none

1,664,803

270,671

'56

1,307,937

237,611

301,630

188,961

242,372

448,220

30,894

49,800

123,708

76,729

none

1,627,223

78,063

PITT.

'52

882,437

107,555

110,000

117,959

193,022

400,760

109,860

(26,500)

137,000

32,334

none

none

1,434,782

677,263

'53

745,078

143,339

115,500

129,984

144,180

352,099

39,000

(146,000)

137,000

47,873

none

none

1,269,531

421,422

'54

631,151

172,123

125,000

119,268

172,393

350,849

35,000

(287,500)

137,000

(6,285)

none

none

1,189,791

198,920

'55

629,779

171,028

110,000

115,333

362,380

364,858

78,099

10,500

137,000

70,072

none

none

1,329,837

601,846

'56

1,254,142

240,381

158,500

193,518

226,250

346,822

45,644

87,000

112,000

56,620

none

none

1,472,557

47,852

ST. L.

'52

993,438

198,461

102,250

255,407

125,483

417,688

IN OTHER

FIGURES

55,000

300,085

48,800

none

942,618

89,152

'53

1,018,412

228,990

109,779

225,427

96,889

408,422

10,000

190,001

57,555

644,889

none

none

1,070,823

702,193

'54

1,349,119

297,265

326,625

225,389

106,821

417,105

10,000

565,000

59,000

561,040

55,000

none

1,227,456

589,382

'55

1,125,910

248,195

326,669

210,253

93,067

360,979

25,000

145,500

55,250

319,901

none

none

1,140,606

43,142

'56

1,296,226

277,521

327,450

266,449

87,492

412,094

21,666

20,500

72,738

267,401

none

none

1,131,244

329,495

PHOTOVON McDANIEL (LEFT) GETS BROTHER LINDY'S PRAISE AFTER BEATING DODGERSPHOTOCOMMISSIONER FRICK, LEAGUE PRESIDENTS HARRIDGE AND GILES HUDDLE SOLEMNLY