ONE-HORSE TOWN

Sumner, Wash., a little town in the heart of Washington's "daffodil country," is wild over a civic-minded horse named Cold Steel. Winner of four races in six starts, Cold Steel's earnings go to support Little League baseball. Cold Steel is owned by 10 Sumner residents, including a wealthy lumber dealer and two retired bartenders. Cold Steel was bought for $1,000, has since proved a big winner at Seattle's nearby Long-acres Race Track. Earnings to date: $5,640. Each time Cold Steel runs, several hundred of Sumner's 2,816 patriots flock to the track, bet their pride with both hands. Says Stockholder Waldo Corbin, who closes his Fountain Lunch on days when Cold Steel runs: "We're a one-horse town and proud of it!"

"THE COLTS," A SUMNER LITTLE LEAGUE TEAM SPONSORED BY HORSE'S WINNINGS, INSPECT THEIR BENEFACTOR. FUTURE COLD STEEL EARNINGS WILL AID OTHER TOWN SPORTS

Checking on Cold Steel, Stockholders Ed Turgeon, Bill Herbert and Merle Muxen add up winnings. Muxen, a jeweler, is Cold Steel's secretary and treasurer.

Showing his new creation (left), the "Cold Steel Sundae," is Waldo Corbin, whose Fountain Lunch is a syndicate hang-out. Corbin closes up when horse runs.

Breezing to a 2-length victory in recent Longacres race, Cold Steel has boosted his community-service earnings to a tidy $5,640.

Studying form chart, five Cold Steel owners, Bill Herbert, Bob Templeman, Ed Turgeon, Kirby Hill and Neal Tebb, fret over race. Hill (second from right) formed syndicate and ensures liaison between owners and Trainer Fred Wait. Owners have from two to six-shares at original price of $25 a share. The sign at left goes up at Corbin's Fountain Lunch when horse runs.

Excited sumnerites among Longacres crowd root for Cold Steel. Happy man with cigar is Morry Abbott, coach of horse-sponsored Little League team.

OLD TED

They have said he is getting old, and he has conceded that perhaps they are right. But he keeps on playing and he keeps on hitting and his batting average looks as young as ever. They have said he is not a team player, that the Red Sox would do better without him. When he has heard them say this he has spit at them, for the records show that the Red Sox have floundered without him. And finally they have said that he is really not as good as his .348 lifetime average, that he fails in the clutch. But American League pitchers will disagree. This year he is feeling older and hitting better than ever. At the time of the All-Star Game, he was hitting a good but mortal .343, with 20 home runs. Since then, in 16 games, he has made 29 hits, including nine homers, and has raised his average to a wonderful .379. Boston fans hope that next year Ted Williams will be even older.

Hitting is what Williams loves more than anything, and no one does it better.

Throwing is not Ted's forte, but short Fenway Park left field makes it easier.

Fielding has never been more to Ted than a necessary pause between at bats.

Sliding back to first, Williams proves he isn't too old to hustle on base paths.

SEVEN PHOTOS FOUR PHOTOSRUSS ADAMS
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)