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THE QUESTION: Will Los Angeles support the Brooklyn Dodgers, win or lose? (Asked in Los Angeles)

Aug. 05, 1957
Aug. 05, 1957

Table of Contents
Aug. 5, 1957

Baseball X-RAY
Acknowledgments
Coming Events
Events & Discoveries
Wonderful World Of Sport
Fitness
State Report
Bonnie Prudden
Honolulu Race
The PGA Comes Back
Tip From The Top
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE QUESTION: Will Los Angeles support the Brooklyn Dodgers, win or lose? (Asked in Los Angeles)

BOB ALTERMAN
Los Angeles
Vice-president
Perma Plaque Corp.
If the Dodgers give us a Kansas City Athletics-or a Baltimore Orioles-type club that hasn't a chance for the pennant, we won't support them. But if they are a good, fighting club, yes. Los Angeles will support a fighter who has a chance, but not a chronic second-division ball club.

This is an article from the Aug. 5, 1957 issue

JACK SHEPARD
Associate General Secretary
Stanford University
As a recent catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, I think it will be a big promotional job keeping people coming to the park. Los Angeles is large enough to support the Dodgers and it will, at first. The one big drawback is our people are accustomed to beaches, barbecues and patio living.

LESLIE A. GAGE
Hollywood
Sales manager
No. There isn't enough interest in big league baseball in this town. Millions of people live here, but the city mushroomed so fast that, basically, it is still a small town in disposition. I occasionally talk about big league baseball to people out here and the usual response is: "Huh! Who needs it?"

CAPT. L. K. WELCH
Altadena, Calif.
TWA pilot
I don't think so; certainly not a losing team. A city needs rapid transit facilities to support a big league club. Los Angeles doesn't have it. The Dodgers will draw on Saturdays and Sundays, but that is not enough. During the week the Angels are lucky to average 1,500 at their games.

DICK POWELL
Movie actor and producer
I think we will. Los Angeles is a first-class city. We have been waiting for big league baseball. Incidentally, my son will probably drag me to every game. Although I like all sports, he almost drives me crazy about baseball. I think the interest of the kids in this section is going to be a great factor.

LEO McCAREY
Beverly Hills
Movie director
A winner, yes. No one likes a loser in sports for any length of time. If the Dodgers come here, they should develop younger players so we can adopt them as our heroes. It is difficult to pick a man of 40, adopt him as your hero and say: "That's my boy Campanula."

GORTZ GOULD
San Diego
Machinery dealer
Certainly they will. I live in a very enthusiastic baseball town, San Diego. Los Angeles is no different and about seven times as large. As a section, we are among the most sports-minded in the United States. Give us any kind of a sport and we will patronize it.

BILL WILLIAMS
Los Angeles
Manufacturer
Los Angeles would be kind to a winner, but would not support a loser. But the same holds in any city. Look at the money the Pirates have lost in a rabid baseball town. But with closed circuit TV on the Coast, the Dodgers would make money even if they were in the second division.

JIM HOWARD
Pasadena
Truck body dealer
Yes, I do think so, even though there seems to be a big difference of opinion out here, due to the poor support given local teams. These teams play good ball, too. A lot depends on location. Chavez Ravine is not the best spot. Traffic is too congested on the Pasadena Freeway.

HENRY EPHRON
Beverly Hills
Movie writer-producer
Yes. Los Angeles is made to order for the Dodgers because there is nothing to do at night. It's a great sports town and the fans would fill the stands at night. It is exactly what is needed to give Los Angeles a sense of identity and get over its inferiority complex toward San Francisco.

ELEVEN PHOTOS