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WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Oct. 07, 1957
Oct. 07, 1957

Table of Contents
Oct. 7, 1957

Baseball X-Ray
Acknowledgments
Run For The Money
Wonderful World Of Sport
Events & Discoveries
Dedicated Willie
Football: Second Week
Preview
Family Affair
Pheasant
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

TWO NIGHTS TO REMEMBER

This is an article from the Oct. 7, 1957 issue Original Layout

It was 11:34 p.m. at Milwaukee's County Stadium. Two men were out and one was on in the 11th inning and Henry Aaron came up swinging his 34-ounce bat. He hit the first pitch into the bleachers, and 40,926 at the ball park and thousands hunched in front of their radios knew that they would not have to wait until next year. The Braves had beaten St. Louis to clinch the pennant and Milwaukee erupted (left and below). The next morning, District Judge Robert W. Hansen dismissed seven arrested for celebrating too vigorously. "Any Milwaukeean," he said, "ought to be forgiven, because last night was a night to remember." But there was no joy in Brooklyn the following night (right), where 6,702 sentimentalists watched the Dodgers beat Pittsburgh 2-0 in what almost everybody regarded as their last game ever at Ebbets Field. Organist Gladys Goodding played a mournful medley, including Thanks for the Memory. "Please do not go on the field after the game," cautioned Announcer Tex Rickards, purely out of habit.

Happy fan guzzles beer from his lamppost perch at Fifth and Wisconsin in a toast to Milwaukee victory.

JUBILANT THRONGS AND HORN-BLOWING MOTORISTS JAM MILWAUKEE'S DOWNTOWN AREA THE NIGHT THE BRAVES FINALLY WON THE PENNANT

Unhappy clown, Brooklyn's Emmett Kelly, stares wistfully from dugout before Dodgers' last home game.

GO TIME FOR THE GIRLS

When autumn comes to the lawns of Philadelphia's Main Line, a young girl's fancy turns to the spirited and ancient game of field hockey. The action here took place at Over-brook, Pa., where Shipley went to play Sacred Heart one crisp, sunny afternoon last week and defeated them 3-2. The girls' day-and-boarding schools of this suburban region, such as Shipley, Baldwin and Agnes Irwin, are located in the national center of a sport which had its beginnings in Persia in 2000 B.C. and is considered the oldest of stick-and-ball games. Although once regarded as too fast and rough for women to play, field hockey in the United States today is predominantly a feminine pastime—and nowhere is the play keener than upon the green fields of the Main Line.

Braced for a shot at the ball, Nan Whitridge shows the determination which has made Shipley an annual hockey power.

Chasing the ball are Sandra Cowhig (left) of Sacred Heart and Pat McIlvain of Shipley. Sacred Heart Convent wears distinctive pinnies over their tunics for team identification.

Converging on Helen Townsend of Shipley (right) are Sandra Cowhig (left), Pat McIlvain and Meredith Fahy of Sacred Heart.

Pretty Nancy Galey of Shipley wears ribbons which indicate varsity awards in lacrosse, basketball, hockey and gymnastics.

Blonde Maude Long of Shipley takes a breather on the sidelines as her second team plays against the Sacred Heart seconds.

PAGES FROM A BOY'S DIARY

Robert Browning (Brownie) Trainer Jr. is 13 and back at school now after a late-summer excursion most youngsters can only dream about: a three-week hunting and fishing trip to British Columbia with Grandpa, who in Brownie's case is Robert A. Uihlein Sr., 74-year-old vice-president of Milwaukee's Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. High in the Cassiar Mountains, Brownie hunted with the men, bagged Stone sheep and caribou, netted trout, recorded such scenes as these in his pocket diary.

Wading Mink Creek, an outlet of remote Cold Fish Lake, Brownie cautiously strips in a frisky rainbow trout which had taken his fly at the head of the riffle.

Climbing above timberline on Sanctuary Ridge, Brownie (left) and Walker begin the day's stalk.

BROWNIE TRAINER (DIARY IN POCKET) LEARNS FROM GRANDPA HOW TO PACK A GUN

BROWNIE AND GUIDE TOM WALKER WAIT WITH WIND IN THEIR FAVOR AS STONE SHEEP COME WITHIN 30 FEET. BROWNIE DID NOT SHOOT SINCE RAMS WERE NOT TROPHY-SIZE

Breakfasting in Cold Fish cookhouse on flapjacks and coffee before day's hunt are Grandpa Uihlein (center) and Brownie.

Sitting around campfire at dusk, Brownie makes daily entry in diary while guides and wranglers plan tomorrow's hunting.

THREE PHOTOSFIVE PHOTOSSUSAN GREENBURGSIX PHOTOSMARSHALL LOCKMAN