SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR: NOMINATIONS WELCOME
Sirs:
Now, I repeat, now is the time for your Mr. Holland or Mr. O'Neil to sit down and write the nominating story of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S Sportsman of the Year 1957. The man: Boston's Ted Williams, of course. Ageless and peerless, you surely must agree that he is this year's man.
WILLIAM McCARTHY
Boston

Sirs:
I nominate Althea Gibson Sportswoman of the Year, 1957. Hers is the most remarkable achievement to date.
STEPHANIE AMES
Toledo

Sirs:
When ye eds. start thinking about 1957's Sportsman of the Year, I hope they will ask 1956 winner Bobby Morrow for his choice.
HELEN FIBREY
New York

•With football's Saturday's heroes still to be reckoned with, Bobby Morrow hereby formally opens nominations for Sportsman (or Sportswoman) of the Year with his choice: Bob Gutowski or Floyd Patterson. The winner, who will join the distinguished company of Roger Bannister (1954), Johnny Podres (1955) and Bobby Morrow (1956), may already have made his mark or may as yet be unheard of. He (or she) may be a person who made a sustained contribution to the sporting ideal—or someone who, for a single blazing hour or day, displayed that quality described by Ernest Hemingway as "grace under pressure." He may be amateur or professional, a star, a trainer, an owner, a teacher, an official, a coach. In any case, the editors, who will announce their decision in the special year-end issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, will be grateful for help.—ED.

BRIDGE: WELCOME
Sirs:
Another major triumph for SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and a big bonus for all your bridge-loving readers came as a happy surprise in your Sept. 16 issue.

Thank you for giving us Charles Goren—he will fill that long-felt want: easy and practical bridge advice for everyone.

Sacramento boasts hosts of bridge addicts and admirers of Charles Goren.
MARGARET PLACE
Sacramento

Sirs:
I see you are going to teach bridge. So this is a "sport"...?
HENRY JEWETT GREENE
Winter Park, Fla.

Sirs:
...Bridge is a sport, as Culbertson used to say, "second only to love."
ALFRED PLANCO
New York

GLOBAL BASEBALL
Sirs:
I read with interest in EVENTS & DISCOVERIES (Sept. 23) that Richard S. Falk of Milwaukee is the father of global baseball.

As a matter of fact, J. G. Taylor Spink, with whom I was formerly associated at his office of The Sporting News in St. Louis, should get that rating. More than 10 years ago, Spink was Global Commissioner for the National Baseball Congress (which cooperates with Falk in his present tournament) and made a number of trips out of the country to get the clubs organized and interested in coming to the U.S. for competition. He was in Japan for two weeks in 1949 and lined up the Japanese teams that now have "been coming to the U.S.
VIRGIL CORY
Denver

•A well-deserved pat on the back for Taylor Spink.—ED.

WANTED: MR. TACHE
Sirs:
I am writing to you about our dog, Mr. Tache, whom we have raised from the age of seven weeks and who never let me out of his sight and who now has disappeared.

When Tache grew to be so beautiful, we decided to show him. This summer he completed his championship. The first and only time he was shown as a champion was at the Somerset Hills show at Far Hills, N.J. on September 7, where he was best of breed.

The next day, Sunday, he disappeared. Although I have advertised in the papers and on radio and circulated more than 1,000 notices, we have heard nothing.

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED reaches so many readers all over the country. I have to be desperate to ask if you could print his picture.
MARY DE W. DALY
Gladstone, N.J.

•Will anyone who sees Tache please call Gladstone, New Jersey, Peapack 8-0491.—ED.

BASEBALL: SOLITARY BLESSING
Sirs:
"To err is human," and it is also human to notice the other man's errors. You have been guilty of the former, and I am being guilty of the latter. I had to mark down an error for you when I came to the BASEBALL X-RAY (Sept. 16). You have informed baseball lovers everywhere that Infielder Herb Plews of Washington has hit no home runs for the entire season. It is an established fact that Plews is not blessed with that popular ability of driving a ball out of the park. Nevertheless, let us give credit where credit is due. One day last summer Mr. Plews stepped up to the plate in Comiskey Park and amazed the White Sox with a solid smash into the right-field seats. It was his first and only home run of the season, but a good one.

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is about the most relaxing recreation I find in the midst of the hustle and bustle of my profession. Your articles are interesting and satisfying, giving the sports enthusiast a wealth of enjoyment with a variety of information. Your special baseball and football issues have been superb.

REV. MARTIN T. BRADTKE
West Bend, Wis.

•Rev. Bradtke is correct.—ED.

TRACK: LET US RECOGNIZE...
Sirs:
It always makes me angry to see unjustified criticism of foreign athletes who break records just because they're foreign. Your article on the illegal Russian jumping shoe (SI, Sept. 9) is a case in point.

I do not recall a similar article by your staff when Bud Held broke the World Javelin Record with his illegal or yet to be declared legal "Held javelin."

American high jumpers have been using cushions inside and outside of their shoes for years, including sponge-rubber soles indoors, to no avail. Harold Osborn used to be accused of holding the bar on with his inside arm. Then they had to make diving legal. Let us recognize the fact that a number of our track records are or have been lousy for years. The 6-foot 11½-inch high jump record of Davis was not much of a jump for a man nearly 6 feet 8 inches tall. Next Gutowski will be accused of using a too springy pole, which we saw Sueo Ohe of Japan demonstrate in Madison Square Garden in 1937. The pole doesn't make the pole vaulter. Richards could probably make 15 feet with a modified clothes pole of sufficient length.

You may expect some other startling track performances out of Russia in the future. With 200 million people to draw from, adequately motivated and scientifically trained, the U.S. will not be able to keep pace. Track has become too much of a political football in this country.
RICHARD V. GANSLEN, PH.D.
Fayetteville, Ark.

•SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, not yet born when the Rev. Held set his mark Aug. 8, 1953, discussed in detail the still controversial new javelin in its June 6, 1955 issue.—ED.

PHOTOHAVE YOU SEEN TACHE?
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)