WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

November 04, 1957

VAGABONDIA SEASON IS HERE

A dinghy sailor responds to a hail with the tip of a silken top hat...a girl elephant named Siam sets off for a wandering week or two in the free air of the Catskills...the Coast Guard and the FBI join in serious inquiries as to the course and whereabouts of the graceful, 52-foot (and missing) schooner Serene. These, as well as the shooting season, were some of the manifestations of autumn in the U.S. as the crisp seasonal air had its immemorial effect upon man and beast. In short, the fall vagabondia season was here.

Debonair sailor Barney Compton Jr., a TV time salesman, sails his eight-foot dinghy up a Rowayton, Conn. tidal creek in a local annual invitation dinghy regatta, a costumed, thoroughly irregular affair which closes a season of proper boating on Long Island Sound.

Footloose elephant Siam, pictured here three years ago with Trainer Alfred Vidbel, his wife Joyce and daughter Sharon, serenely plodded over hill and dale for 13 days, eluding posses of weary volunteer elephant hunters after her escape from a Windham, N.Y. farm.

Missing schooner Serene was chartered in New York by a crew of Chicago awning salesmen, who hoisted sail and—in calm seas—disappeared. Last week, two months after her charter was up, authorities were still baffled.

SO HE TOOK THE $155,047.50

Kentucky Breeder A. B. Hancock collected top money (SI, Oct. 28) and the cup when Hartack won the Garden State with Nadir

AND

OTHERS TOOK THEIRS TOO...

With their hopes high and their Thoroughbreds in fine fettle as they snorted in the brisk New Jersey air, 12 anxious owners descended on Garden State race track last Saturday to watch their horses go after a share of the year's richest purse—the $277,150 Garden State for 2-year-olds at a mile and a sixteenth. The owners were a diversified lot, ranging from a housewife to a boot manufacturer. But the majority, appropriately enough, were farmers of one sort or another, and to the farmers went all the chips. The biggest chip of all, worth $155,047.50, went to Kentucky Breeder Arthur B. (Bull) Hancock, whose temperamental Nadir took command midway in the race and, under a superlative ride by Willie Hartack, got home two lengths in front. As the field went into the tight first turn with Nadir in good position astern of pacesetters Yemen and Music Man Fox, Owner-breeder Hancock leapt on top of his seat and began a steady yell which was climaxed only when, with victory nearly assured, he gave out with one final Bull-like "Come on, Bill!" and then toppled neatly off his chair into the nervous arms of Trainer Moody Jolley. "What a wonderful day for you," said New Jersey's Governor Robert B. Meyner. "Yep," said Hancock, "for a little old country boy, I reckon I did all right today."

THE TOBACCO FARMER: $55,430
R. Douglas Prewitt paid a $10,000 supplementary nomination fee for Terra Firma and watched his big gamble pay dividends.

THE RACING EXEC: $36,572.50
William duPont Jr.'s Rose Trellis, another supplementary entry, was closing fast on the leaders at the finish.

THE TRUCK FARMER: $13,857.50
Mrs. Anna Cannuli's Chance It Tony, named for husband Anthony, was long shot who came up from eighth to edge favored Misty Flight.

WOMEN MAKE IT

Another masculine retreat falls as two ladies with unladylike shotguns invade a Minnesota duck camp

On northwest Minnesota's land of lakes and ducks a detail of doctors descends each autumn weekend, leaving behind duties, dilemmas and doting wives. Ac least, this has always been recommended hunting procedure since these Minneapolis men of medicine and shotguns founded their bachelor retreat outside of Melby. But in hunting, as in medicine, procedures often change—and so the good doctors of duckology discovered this season. A lady slipped through the firing line. Not, of course, without extraneous circumstances. One of the doctors invited SPORTS ILLUSTRATED to sample some really fine Minnesota waterfowl shooting. He didn't reckon that Virginia Kraft, lady reporter and Nimrod (see page 71), would accept the invitation. And where there is one lady, said the doctor's wife, why not another? Armed with shotguns, both ladies arrived, had some fine shooting and—triumph—were warmly invited back.

Preparing for big weekend, Drs. Donald McCormick (left), William Jefferies and George Garske unload their hunting gear from station wagon at doctors' duck camp.

Anticipating big appetites, hunting-clad Dr. Leonard A. Lang wrassles with bacon and eggs in gas-lit bachelor kitchen of two-room hunting camp on Lake Christine.

Delighted doctor, Urologist George Garske, beams on lady interloper, wife Beth, as happy hunters walk through autumn foliage to duck blinds on nearby pass between Lake Christine and Lake Inca.

Delivering the bird, Dr. Richard Tucker's 2-year-old black Lab, Pirate, splashes out of wintry water with a downed bluewing teal and hearty approval of his master.

Inspecting the bag, Minnesota Game Wardens Fred Johnson (right) and Otto Trick are shown doctors' morning harvest by Carl Tucker (left), father of club member.

SIX PHOTOS PHOTOEIGHT SETS OF VISIBLE TEETH ATTEST THE JOYOUS ATMOSPHERE IN WINNER'S CIRCLE AS NEW JERSEY GOVERNOR ROBERT B. MEYNER (LEFT) PRESENTS TROPHY TO HANCOCK PHOTONADIR'S GREAT RUN GAVE HARTACK NEW RECORD OF 41 STAKES WINS IN ONE SEASON FIVE PHOTOSART SHAY

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)