Search

THE QUESTION: Do you think that alumni groups are harmful to college sports? (Asked at the American Alumni Council meeting in Pasadena, Calif.)

Nov. 04, 1957
Nov. 04, 1957

Table of Contents
Nov. 4, 1957

Acknowledgments
Now In November
Spectacle
The Boy Grew Up
Events & Discoveries
Pro Basketball Preview
'Oceanus'
What's In A Name?
Wilderness
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE QUESTION: Do you think that alumni groups are harmful to college sports? (Asked at the American Alumni Council meeting in Pasadena, Calif.)

HOWARD W. MORT
University of Chicago
President
Amer. Alumni Council
Yes—when they demand bowl games and Madison Square Garden finals; when their only college support is a Cadillac for a "perfect" season or a "goodby" banner for a three-game loser. No—when their enthusiasm inspires top classroom performance and effective athletic teamwork.

This is an article from the Nov. 4, 1957 issue

BEA FIELD
Tulane University
Director of Alumni Activities
The activities of some alumni groups today are harmful. They are motivated by loyalty to their colleges, the glamour of sports and their own competitive spirit. However, in the last three years, I've sensed a marked change. "Student-athlete" has become almost a catchword.

JAMES E. ARMSTRONG
Notre Dame
Alumni Secretary
No. The alumni groups who send athletes to their colleges are, in the main, doing a good job. These boys are serious about their educations. As specific examples, the average marks of the football players at Notre Dame, Brown and the Naval Academy are higher than the averages of their schools.

TOM NICKELL
USC
Director of Alumni Fund
The help that alumni give to college sports is not detrimental. We have a good athletic tradition at USC, and we introduced the higher academic standards now under conference study. "Trojan" implies something that is good. There have been 51 Trojans on Olympic teams.

VERNON B. ALDEN
Harvard Business School
Associate Dean
In a seminar for college presidents held at the Harvard Business School, a case dealt with alumni pressure on athletics. The consensus was that they have matured and are now three years beyond the stage when it was a question whether they or the colleges would control the athletic programs.

WALDO C. M. JOHNSTON
Yale University
Executive Secretary
Alumni board
A few instances have given some alumni groups bad publicity, but most alumni realize the importance of athletics as a factor in all-round development of students. They know that the problem is to keep athletics in proper proportion. Yale alumni are completely cooperative.

VICTOR F. STEFAN
U. of Santa Clara
Alumni Director
The growth of football during the Depression helped the West Coast colleges meet their expenses. Football grew too fast. Competition for players became tremendous. Some alumni groups within the alumni associations, operating without the sanction of the universities, have been very harmful.

BOB SIBLEY
Berkeley, Calif.
Past president
Amer. Alumni Council
In general, no. True, the unauthorized action of individuals and small alumni groups in recruiting and subsidizing football players in our conference resulted in suspensions by the NCAA, but that certainly should not damn all the other alumni who are responsible for a lot of college enthusiasm.

JIM CREASMAN
Arizona State at Tempe
Alumni Secretary
Alumni groups are harmful when they want to win at any cost. Many of them do. But the majority of alumni throughout the country regard sports and enjoy them as only one vital part of university programs. To them, winning at any cost is harmful to the universities they love.

ERNEST T. STEWART
Executive Director
Amer. Alumni Council
No. Most alumni have a healthy interest in college sports. The unofficial activities of a few, known as the lunatic fringe, who insist upon winning at any price, are definitely harmful. It's really unfortunate that the alumni in general are blamed for the excesses of these few.

ELEVEN PHOTOS