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WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

Nov. 11, 1957
Nov. 11, 1957

Table of Contents
Nov. 11, 1957

Powerboat Results
Age Of The Hobo
Yesterday
Fisherman's Calendar
Acknowledgments
The Big Auto Race
Backyard Football
Spectacle
Wonderful World Of Sport
Events & Discoveries
The Scrutable East
Football's Seventh Week
Lemon Drop Kid
Sport In Art
The Jockey Club
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

FOOTBALL IN THE LITTLE IVY

This is an article from the Nov. 11, 1957 issue

While the big guns of college football boomed across the land (see page 42), the game and its Saturday jubilations went marching on at less celebrated gridiron centers. In Medford, Mass., for instance, the unbeaten Lord Jeffs of Amherst (founded 1821) met the unbeaten Jumbos of Tufts (founded 1852) in a contest which had meaning only in Little Ivy circles. But the game, which drew 3,500 watchers in the rain, was only part of the occasion, which included competitive decoration of fraternity houses, hand-in-hand strolls and postgame parties. Oh, yes: Amherst won 19-6.

ATO BROTHERS TAKE 9:30 A.M. BEER BREAK AFTER DECORATING THEIR HOUSE

ZETA PSI TOUCHES UP A MOCK INTERMENT OF AMHERST'S LORD JEFF, BUT THEIR PLOT BACKFIRED

SPECTATORS ON TUFTS SIDE ENDURE PREGAME DRIZZLE. WHEN RAIN CAME MANY LEFT FOR SHELTER, INCLUDING THE TUFTS BAND

JIM ARMOUR SHOWS MIKI FARRO STUFFED JUMBO IN THE TUFTS MUSEUM

TUFTS STUDENTS AND DATES PARTY AT DU HOUSE AFTER GAME. ON COUCH ARE LINDA FERRUCCI AND SOPHOMORE JACK CROWLEY

LOVE AMONG THE ANGELS

From a standup of baseball, it's a great thing for southern California," proclaimed Casey Stengel, at the gradiose "Welcome Dodgers" luncheon in Los Angeles last week. From the moment the Bums arrived, politicians have loved 'em, Hollywood flacks have trotted out starlets to love 'em, and Angelenos have been in the throes of their greatest public love affair since Doug Fairbanks wooed Mary Pickford.

But Dodger President Walter O'Malley is not a man to let sentiment interfere with unfinished business. He concluded his luncheon remarks ominously: "We will go quietly, and we will come back when we know how your referendum comes out." For even as the guests were singing themselves hoarse in adulation, pickets wound sinisterly among the welcome signs with placards reading "Save Chavez Ravine."

These dissidents are convinced O'Malley wanted, not a big-league franchise, but downtown real estate with oil under it, even though O'Malley has waived oil rights to the ravine, site of the Dodgers' new stadium. If the opposition can collect 51,000 signatures they could force a referendum election next June. It was this melancholy possibility that clouded O'Malley's moonlike face as he stood among the revelers.

DODGER STAFF POSES FOR AN ADVANCE-ORDERS SCENE

PRESIDENT WALTER O'MALLEY TELLS LUNCHEON GATHERING OF 1,100 THAT HIS DODGERS WILL BRING THEM THE PENNANT IN 1958

O'MALLEY FEEDS POT ROAST TO OLD CHARACTER ACTOR STENGEL

DUKE SNIDER, HOLLYWOOD DELEGATES ADMIRE CANDY SIGN

LOVESICK ANGELENOS WELCOME DODGERS AT THE AIRPORT

FAN RAY PEABODY GIVES THE TEAM A GIMMICKED GREETING

FIVE PHOTOSJOHN LOENGARDSIX PHOTOS