WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

November 25, 1957

BANG, CRACKLE AND POP

Drum majorettes and bowl queens are unknown in France, except by hearsay, but the French, a basically sound race, know very well how to decorate a major sports event. And so the other day cute little Ludmilla Tcherina, a ballerina borrowed from French opera, stuck a finger in one ear and fired the shot that sent 30 cyclists off around Paris' Vélodrome d'Hiver in a six-day bike race—a shot that was just one detail in the general bang, crackle and pop of the world of sport.

Six-day bike racing was invented in the U.S. in the 1890s and, after some reflection, adopted by the French as an indoor version of a sport which preoccupies Frenchmen every summer. The Vél d'Hiv race was won by the Franco-Italian team of André Darrigade, Ferdinand Terruzzi and Jacques Anquetil, the dashing Tour de France champion. For bangs, crackles and pops on the home front, turn the page.

Pianist Frank Lane, a man of varied talents, often noisy, was hired by the Cleveland Indians last week to replace Hank Greenberg as general manager. Lane, 61, is shown here thumping out a number for four of his new players: (from left to right) Catchers Jim Hegan and Hal Naragon, Pitchers Ray Narleski and Mike Garcia. Said Lane, who resigned as general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals to take on the demanding job: "One thing we must do is rehabilitate the morale of the Cleveland fans." That can only mean Lane's storied swapping of ballplayer flesh will in all probability eventually break up the cheerful quartet above.

Voyageurs who paddled and portaged two 16-foot canoes from Denver to Old Town, Me. fatten up on lobster after completing their 5,000-mile journey last week. The hairy canoeists are (left to right): Bengt Soderstrom, 32, and Ed Vestal, 29, Aspen, Colo. ski instructors; Earl Rickers, 29, of Chester, Calif., a writer, and Gerald Hewey, 27, of Cape Elizabeth, Me., a ski resort manager. The quartet shoved off May 1 and headed east to the Missouri, up the Mississippi and the St. Croix to the Great Lakes and, 10 swampings later, portaged their 1,000 pounds of gear through the Canadian wilderness to Maine, arriving at Old Town Nov. 11. The boys started out with $5,000, wound up with empty pockets. Said Vestal: "I'll never do it again." The others wearily agreed.

House hunters Willie and Marghuerite Mays (right) bought this home in San Francisco, where Willie is now employed as a center fielder, after Owner Walter Gnesdiloff finally accepted their $37,500 offer. Gnesdiloff at first feared his neighbors might reject the man most likely to be San Francisco's civic hero of 1958. Catalyst of the affair was Mayor George Christopher, who invited the Mayses to be guests at his home. Said Willie: "I hate to think my color would have prevented me from buying a place where I wanted to be."

Happy Fella and Most Valuable Player is Henry Aaron, the lean and marvelously skilled outfielder for the Milwaukee Braves, who, at 23, is the second youngest ballplayer to win the National League award. Aaron led the league in home runs (44) and RBIs (132), tied for third in batting (.322) and received 239 points in the balloting. Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals was second with 230, Aaron's teammate, Red Schoendienst, was third with 221.

Shotgun George Stranahan, who rode an armored car loaded with petitions bearing 82,180 signatures, transfers his cargo to C. A. Owen, head of the Citizens Committee to Save Chavez Ravine for the People. The desperate Los Angeles band, which is trying to head off Dodger President Walter O'Malley before he can reach the ravine and build his ball park there, needs 51,767 signatures to force a vote, but the law-abiding City Clerk has already invalidated 11,261 names.

Cartographer Neal Rivers temporarily rearranges the contours of Gene Fullmer's map with a right-hand blow in the eighth round of their televised fight from Madison Square Garden last week. Fullmer, who has ambitions of regaining the middleweight championship he lost to Sugar Ray Robinson last May, was extremely fortunate to gain a split-decision victory. Rivers won the surgical battle, however; he required only six stitches to Fullmer's 16.

AIRLIFT FOR PHEASANT

This autumn, when the first freezing blasts of wind swept across the bleak grainfields of South Dakota, well-armed invaders descended upon the tiny airport at Watertown. Arriving from all over the U.S. by light plane, private DC-3 and commercial aircraft, they touched down and presently enjoyed some of the finest pheasant shooting in the U.S. Last year, 19,428 out-of-state gunners and 118,000 South Dakotans shot over a million and a half cocks in the month-long season, and this year the bag should be even higher. For a look at pheasant hunting overseas see page 76.

Illinois hunters Don Getts (left), a cement contractor, and Realtor Russell Johnson flew from Rockford in Beechcraft Bonanza.

Missouri arrivals include William Shean of Springfield (right), Lon H. Perry, a partner of General Insurance, Inc., St. Louis.

Dallas Investor John Murchison, son of fabled Clint, is greeted by executive of Midland National Life, a Murchison enterprise.

Virginia physician, Dr. Jerome Cope of Arlington, arrives the night before the season opens. Cope is a former Watertown boy.

Washington, D.C. surgeon and Georgetown University professor, Dr. Howard Strine, disembarks from a special Braniff flight.

Texas party, who came up in their own DC-3, includes Vannie Cook (right), owner of a Coca-Cola bottling plant in McAllen.

PHOTOHENRI CARTIER-BRESSON PHOTOCARL IWASAKIHOOVER VACUUM CLEANER VICE-PRESIDENT O. M. MANSAGER (FOREGROUND) OF CANTON, OHIO WATCHES UNLOADING OF COMPANY DC-3 PHOTOCARL IWASAKIIN FROM GREEN BAY, WIS. FOR A WEEKEND SHOOT ARE (LEFT TO RIGHT) DON ROUSSEAU, ELLSWORTH NELSON AND HERB STEENBLOCK SIX PHOTOSCARL IWASAKI SEVEN PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)