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ART ON THE COURT

Dec. 09, 1957
Dec. 09, 1957

Table of Contents
Dec. 9, 1957

Acknowledgments
Fisherman's Calendar
Coming Events
The American Game
Spectacle
  • Basketball's boom has triggered a chain reaction of new multimillion-dollar arenas equipped to handle great crowds in a setting of colorful, geometric beauty

Art On The Court
  • Behind the apparently aimless swirl of 10 young men racing down a polished hardwood floor and the dynamic disarray which they present beneath the basket, there exist certain basic, even classic, patterns and skills. In instants of perfection, they also become an art, indigenous to this sport alone: the shooting, playmaking and defense which make up the game of basketball

Dixie's Hero
Quel Homme!
Yesterday
Figures
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

ART ON THE COURT

Behind the apparently aimless swirl of 10 young men racing down a polished hardwood floor and the dynamic disarray which they present beneath the basket, there exist certain basic, even classic, patterns and skills. In instants of perfection, they also become an art, indigenous to this sport alone: the shooting, playmaking and defense which make up the game of basketball

Revolutionary scoring technique of recent years has been one-handed jump shot, used above by Tom Heinsohn, last year's outstanding rookie for the Boston Celtics. Because it can be executed at top speed and with quickness from a virtually unstoppable position high off floor, it has great advantage over old two-handed set shot, shown at left by ex-Duquesne star Si Green.

This is an article from the Dec. 9, 1957 issue Original Layout

Driving dribble, as executed by master of ball control like Hot Rod Hundley, can be dazzling offensive maneuver, putting player in position close under basket for easy layup, or strong defensive tactic when a team that is ahead needs to stall. Here Hundley, who is very quick and has exceptionally good hands, has outmaneuvered his guard (notice partially crossed legs) with fake to right, then uses speed and teammate's protective screen, just visible in third picture, to drive around opponent on way to the goal.

Defensive value of big man, obscured for years by preoccupation with his vast scoring potential, is fast receiving recognition because of eye-popping exploits of such talented giants as Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain and Bob Pettit. Here Pettit shows how it is done: using his height, agility and sense of timing, the 6-foot 9-inch center of the St. Louis Hawks goes high into the air to block what would otherwise be an almost certain two points.

Fast break is basketball's most exciting maneuver, combines elements of forward pass, hockey's power play, the 100-yard dash and a double steal. Play begins with rebounder taking ball off opponents' backboard and whipping it downcourt to his speeding teammates. It should end with the attackers beating their opponents to the goal. Best defense is one the Celtics use here: turn around and run for other end of court as fast as you can.

Towering height still remains biggest single factor in game today whenever tall player is fortunate possessor of athletic ability usually found only in smaller men. Here 7-foot Wilt Chamberlain soars high above everyone's head to cram ball down through basket, undoubtedly the most devastating method yet found to score two points.

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CLASSIC SCREEN PLAY

This style of attack is built around a basic element of most successful basketball plays, the screen. Legal roadblock is set up by one player to enable a teammate to evade his guard and offers numerous variations depending upon reaction of the defense. Here Bob Pettit starts with ball (1), passes off to teammate Bill Calhoun moving out from right side of basket (2). Pettit then cuts across circle (3) to set screen on Calhoun's guard. When both defensive players stick to Calhoun (4), Pettit slides off into open (5), accepts return pass (6) and scores (7-8). When Pettit's guard switched to Calhoun, latter's guard should have picked up Pettit. His failure led to play's success.