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ESPECIALLY FOR HIGH-HANDICAP GOLFERS

Dec. 16, 1957
Dec. 16, 1957

Table of Contents
Dec. 16, 1957

From The Flyways
Fisherman's Calendar
Three For The Money
Horses Of The Year
Minor Leagues
Canary Islands
The New Way To Ski—Second Lesson:
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Acknowledgments
Pat On The Back

ESPECIALLY FOR HIGH-HANDICAP GOLFERS

Two of the most common errors that harry mediocre golfers is their failure to make a proper pivot and their tendency to let the left arm collapse before impact. Let us confine ourselves at this time to discussing the latter.

This is an article from the Dec. 16, 1957 issue Original Layout

In a correct golf swing the left arm should be straight throughout an arc of some 180°: from shoulder height on the backswing through shoulder height on the swing-through. When the left arm collapses before impact, nine times out of 10 a pronounced slice results. Usually this collapse of the left arm is tied in with a premature turning of the right side and shoulder into the shot. When you rush the right side into the shot too soon, you throw your body and arms outside the correct line to the ball and you are then compelled to swing from the outside in to contact the ball. That right side must stay relatively inactive until much later in the swing. Maintaining your left arm straight and firm through impact will delay the action of the right side until the proper time.

When I had the considerable pleasure of working with the Duke of Windsor on his game, one of the points we gave major attention to was this alliance of the straight left arm and the retarded right side. I think the duke's mastery of this was as important as any one feature in his improvement from a 100 golfer to a low-80s player.

from GEORGE GORDON Wannamoisett Country Club, Rumford, R.I.

PHOTOILLUSTRATIONcorrectILLUSTRATIONincorrect

NEXT WEEK: DOW FINSTERWALD ON THINKING THE SHOT OUT