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HELEN LENGFELD

Jan. 06, 1958
Jan. 06, 1958

Table of Contents
Jan. 6, 1958

Acknowledgments
From The Flyways
All Hail The Lusty Lions
A Star Is Born
  • By William F. Talbert

    Barry MacKay, who very nearly missed the trip, was the big news as the U.S. failed to win back the Davis Cup. His team captain here-calls him the hope of tennis

Pitt's Ticket
Sporting Look
SPANIELS
  • Nor rain nor cold nor reluctant birds could stop these spaniels from brisk completion of their top contest: the National Field Trial Championships

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

HELEN LENGFELD

Mrs. Louis Lengfeld, in the opinion of her friends, has not slowed down since she was one of San Francisco's top golfers. Mother of three and grandmother of four, her lifetime of devotion to golf has led her into activities that culminated recently with membership on the President's Council for Youth Fitness. In 1941, when she was president of the California Women's Golf Association, she mobilized golfers for recreational work with servicemen. Out of this grew the Swing Clubs which she directs. A golfing program which began in veterans' hospitals, it has now blossomed into a scheme which includes youth groups, with an eye on golf's contribution to physical fitness and the building of future champions. Under the aegis of the United Voluntary Services, which Helen Lengfeld also heads, top golfers volunteer their time to coach the kids. In a recent eight-month period Mrs. Lengfeld traveled 27,000 miles by car and 12,000 by train to encourage her projects. There are Swing Clubs in 63 veterans' hospitals, some overseas and even on "Texas Towers." In her spare time Helen Lengfeld, who lives near San Francisco, runs the Jr. Girls State Championships at Pebble Beach, edits a golf magazine and stages the women's golf tournaments on the Monterey Peninsula. But she doesn't find time to play golf any more.

This is an article from the Jan. 6, 1958 issue Original Layout

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