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THE QUESTION: Is the fox hunt doomed?

Jan. 06, 1958
Jan. 06, 1958

Table of Contents
Jan. 6, 1958

Acknowledgments
From The Flyways
All Hail The Lusty Lions
A Star Is Born
  • By William F. Talbert

    Barry MacKay, who very nearly missed the trip, was the big news as the U.S. failed to win back the Davis Cup. His team captain here-calls him the hope of tennis

Pitt's Ticket
Sporting Look
SPANIELS
  • Nor rain nor cold nor reluctant birds could stop these spaniels from brisk completion of their top contest: the National Field Trial Championships

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE QUESTION: Is the fox hunt doomed?

RIVES S. MATTHEWS
Skillman, N.J.
Writer
No! Just as the late Dr. Alfred Kinsey, with his studies of the sexes, stopped the Marxian trend to a classless society, so the fox will become, as suburbia spreads like poison ivy to God knows where, a rallying point for the gentry who hop by helicopter to unsubdivided hinterlands.

This is an article from the Jan. 6, 1958 issue

MRS. ARTHUR J. McCASHIN
Former master of the hounds
Fairfield, Conn.
No. Down through the centuries this question has been posed over and over again. Fox hunting has been doomed many times, but it is more active today than it has been in years. Organized fox hunting clubs may have to change locale, but they manage to survive all change and even war.

BAYARD TUCKERMAN JR.
Boston
Insurance executive
No. It's true that new roads have made fox hunting difficult. Also, the influx of deer has hurt the sport considerably by leading the hounds astray. However, the fact that there are more beagles registered than any other breed indicates that people still have a love of fox hunting.

JOHN D. BULGER
Director of education National Wildlife Federation
Yes, except for special clubs. It's the sport of the privileged few Miles of open country are needed. There's one hunt today for every 25 of former years. People turn foxes loose and hunters see red, claiming they destroy small game.

MRS. JOHN J. McDONALD
Syosset, N.Y.
Definitely not. Foxhunting will have to make certain concessions to change. But when the Meadow Brook on Long Island can turn out 73 persons on bitterly cold and icy New Year's Day, there's nothing wrong with the future of fox hunting.

JAMES R. WESTMAN
Rutgers University Head of Department of Wildlife
It's becoming more difficult. Deer are numerous. Few dogs can stay on a fox hunt without chasing deer. Some dogs are being trained to chase fox exclusively, but in many places drag hunting, with lures to lead dogs on, has replaced the real fox hunt.

LLOYD BOWERS
Deputy fish and game warden
New Jersey
No, but it will be curtailed. New housing and new roads mean moving to new and distant hunting grounds. But plenty of good hunting remains. Fox hunting done with a brace or a small pack of good dogs has been increasing rapidly.

LAWRENCE C. PHIPPS JR.
Denver, Colo.
Master of the Arapahoe Hunt
No. There is a trend toward country life in the U.S. Training riding groups, pony clubs and junior hunts encourages many recruits to carry on the tradition. No other sport may be enjoyed by so many people of all ages regardless of their proficiency.

NINE PHOTOS