SNOW AND FUN: GRADE A IN DAIRYLAND

February 17, 1958

February as usual found the world full of skiing. There was a jam in the Austrian Tyrol to watch the world ski championships (see page 40), seemingly unending processions on the slopes of the Sierras and the Rockies, not to mention the venerable ski slopes of New England. In the Laurentians, 40,000 skiers' cars clogged the Montreal road for six hours. But perhaps the most interesting pictorial evidence of skiing's fascination came from the dairy and lake country of Wisconsin—a land with hardly a topographical lump worth mentioning. Here, too, skiers were finding slopes. The run at Mt. Telemark, Wis. (left), a half mile from top to bottom, last week logged in its 20,000th skier—he and all his predecessors apparently as happy as if the Tyrol and the Rockies had never been invented. Telemark skiers were but part of a record tally of 300,000 skiers in the Midwest this winter. One good reason for all the activity: the 300 ski-tow areas in the Midwest are having some of the best snow conditions ever.

PHOTOANTHONY LANE

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)