WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT

March 03, 1958

BOB MEYNER PERFORMS IN A NEW ARENA

The most honorable, if not the most celebrated, player in the national indoor tennis tournaments in Manhattan last week was Robert B. Meyner, the Democratic governor of New Jersey and a candidate (so some say) for the U.S. presidency in 1960. Paired with Davis Cup Veteran Gardnar Mulloy and togged out in a knit shirt designed (so the label said) by Lew Hoad, Meyner opined before his senior doubles matches began: "If Gardnar will watch seven-eighths of the court and leave the rest to me, we'll make the semifinals." Sure enough, Mulloy and the governor set down W. D. Cunningham and Edward Dame 6-3, 11-9 in the first match. And a default carried them through the quarter-finals. But in the semis, while Meyner covered his eighth of the court, Jeff Mendel and Ed Tarangioli, both Republicans, dispatched Mulloy hither and yon, won the match 7-5, 6-3.

Said Mulloy afterward: "Will you play with me again in 1960 when you're President?" The governor took the serve neatly and lobbed back: "Will you play with me again in 1960 if I'm still governor?" Meyner then caught the next plane to Washington for a Democratic dinner, left the national senior doubles title for Berkeley Bell and Edgar Nye.

...AND SO DOES MLLE. BARDOT
Brigitte Bardot, fetching French actress who turns up in just about every other movie house these days, turned up at Cortina, scene of the 1956 Winter Olympics. The French press said it all had to do with love: she had fallen out of love with her fiancé and in love with a married man; it was too much, and doctors ordered a vacation in the mountains. To pass the hours in Cortina, Brigitte undertook to learn ice skating. On her first day (above) she managed perhaps the most stricken look of her career.

SERIOUS SIDE OF IT ALL

As the first comedy writer learned, the shortest, and surest, route to a laugh is to examine man in earnest endeavor. To wit, the pictures below

Look, ma, no head, but very model of submarine composure is Charles F. Waterman of De Land, Fla., who stepped into a deep pocket while wading St. Johns River. Living up to his name, Waterman struggled onward and upward, dutifully retrieving his lure while his resourceful wife took this picture.

Look, Duchess, no trouble at all, surprised Duke of Windsor seems to say as he blasts out of sand with cigaret at rakish dangle while playing Glen Arven course, Thomasville, Ga. Duke was guest of retired Investment Banker Charles Cushing at his nearby plantation.

Look, voters, here's how. While quail hunting with George M. Humphrey in Thomasville, President Eisenhower serenely and incorrectly clasps his hands over gun barrels. Secretary Hagerty supplied happy, irascible ending by explaining weapon was unloaded.

Look, coach, four hands, and the momentary answer to an alumnus' prayer is Hugh Brolly of La Salle College about to score a basket against West Chester Teachers at Philadelphia. But truth, alas, must out: two of the hands are the property of West Chester's Terry Gorman. Oh yes, La Salle won 68-66.

PHOTOGOVERNOR ROBERT MEYNER RUSHES HEADLONG ACROSS COURT FOR BACKHAND RETURN. HIS SHOT, SKIMMING NET, WON POINT PHOTOGOVERNOR SHAKES HANDS WITH CUNNINGHAM AND DAME AFTER THE MATCH PHOTOTROOPER ATTENDS BOSS IN LOCKER ROOM PHOTOHELEN MEYNER APPLAUDS HUSBAND'S GAME WITH MODERATION PHOTOMULLOY, MEYNER PLOT GAME STRATEGY BEFORE SEMIFINALS FIVE PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)