March 03, 1958
March 03, 1958

Table of Contents
March 3, 1958

Snow Patrol
No More Room
Motor Sports
Horse Show
Squash Racquets
  • By T.H.L.

    The Boston Frenchman found just the right touch to beat the Philadelphia strong boy

Sporting Look
The Mulberry Bush
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back


Seated above in a spider web of his own designs is the gentleman who is responsible for the knitted fashions favored by the American woman who travels fastest, farthest and neatest. Young (32 years) Bob Goldworm, partner with his mother in a 30-year-old New York knitwear business, is one of the first Americans to reverse the flow of designing talent which hitherto has continually brought Europeans to America. He goes to Italy to design styles in the American tradition—a clean-cut silhouette with no clutter. Three years ago the firm produced the first full-length dress made like a flat-knit cardigan sweater, and since then the Goldworms have taken over a factory near Milan to produce dresses for the American market. The Goldworm product is based on Italian hand-fashioning, a process which builds the shape in and tailors seams and edges in a manner that cannot be duplicated by U.S. machines. Seven variations of this spring's chemise look are shown above. Clockwise from the model seated at the left are a two-piece middy dress with pleated skirt ($45); semi-fitted chemise ($40); striped "bag" ($35); cardigan coat to be worn with or without a matching sheath ($125); sheath with short striped jacket ($55); shirt dress ($35), two-piece sweater dress ($45). The shoes are low-heeled T-strap sandals by Joyce ($14). Dresses are available at Lord & Taylor, New York; Blum's, Philadelphia; Gidding's, Cincinnati; Himelhoch, Detroit; Bramson's, Chicago; Rich's, Inc., Atlanta; and Ransohoff's, San Francisco.

This is an article from the March 3, 1958 issue Original Layout