The melting snowsof spring swelled Vermont's West River into a cold, tumbling torrent that lureda rugged breed of sportsman—the canoe slalomist—to Jamaica, Vt. last week forthe third annual U.S. National White Water Slalom Championship. The course wasset over a wild 600-yard stretch of rapids made more difficult by 16 gatesthrough which the canoeists had to pass. The men—35 of them—had the singlescompetition to themselves, but a sturdy women's auxiliary of nine turned up,grasped paddles and joined the men in dashing mixed doubles eventually won byRobert and Edith McNair.

The compleatpaddler, Alice Huttenbach, totes her racing gear upriver for the start of herrun with Corney King.

Vermont GovernorJoseph Johnson congratulates Edith McNair of Philadelphia, who with husband Bobwon mixed doubles.

Smile gone now,Alice Huttenbach concentrates on guiding canoe's bow through the rapids whileKing steadies the stern.

Race is a familyaffair for Mrs. Eliot DuBois, who slings affectionate arm around her son Kinnyafter shooting the rapids.

Bow Paddler, PatLove, seems to be plowing into a wall of water here, and that is exactly whatshe is doing. Pat and her husband Ed were dumped into the river seconds afterthis picture was taken, floated 50 yards until rescuers pulled them out,chilled but safe.

Submerged rocksin the river form nasty standing waves called haystacks by canoeists. Here FredSawyer and wife Mary Jane are nearly upset by one such stack. They remainedupright, however, and took second place in the national slalomchampionships.

Doughty McNairsappear to be awash, but they survived this stretch of the West River andcompleted the course in 314 seconds to win the national mixed doubles. TheMcNairs represented Philadelphia's Buck Ridge Ski Club in their taming of theWest.

The EliotDuBoises of Boston paddle into less turbulent home stretch of the course inwhich the slalom gates are set to test their ability to maneuver the craftprecisely between openings 48 to 56 inches wide. They were good enough tocapture third place.

BOURBON ON WATER:DON JUAN SAILS THE ATLANTIC

When Don Juan deBourbon y Battenberg, Count of Barcelona, pretender to the throne of Spain, setsail from Portugal, where he maintains a rented residence, for New York on aborrowed yacht, he said: "This is purely a sporting adventure and nopolitical meaning whatsoever should be attached to it." Don Juan, 44, whoserved and had his forearms tattooed in the British Navy, had on board a mostresplendent crew: Rear Admiral Sir Arthur Rattray, retired, of Great Britain;Beltran Alfonso, Duke of Alburquerque, a grandee of Spain; Gonzalo Fernandez,Marquis of Povar; Manuel Brito e Cunha, former Portuguese golf champion; andfour professional seamen.

A month afterthey hauled anchor, the sporting adventurers on the Saltillo, a 72-foot, 60-tonauxiliary ketch, made Antigua. In Puerto Rico, Don Juan, who has shot in thelow 70s, got in a spot of golf. An accomplished sportsman, Don Juan plays awicked game of tennis, attends hare coursings, race meetings and bullfights towhile away his exile.

Despite theapolitical intent of the voyage, things may get quite sticky when Don Juanarrives in New York. His son, Juan Carlos, favored by Generalissimo Franco toassume the throne one day, will probably be in Washington then on a socialvisit. The Spanish Embassy does not expect that they will meet.

Teeing off at SanJuan is Don Juan. Following ball is resident pro Rusty Gilbert.

Casting off, DonJuan poses Captain Blighlike as his deckhands unfurl the sails and thread thesafety rail.

EIGHT PHOTOSHANSON T. CARROLL TWO PHOTOSMICHEL ALEXIS TWO PHOTOSMICHEL ALEXISJUAN GUIDES "SALTILLO" OUT OF SAN JUAN (BELOW) AS THE CREW ADJUSTS GENOA. GAFF-RIGGED KETCH (ABOVE) GAINS SEA

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)