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'SAILING WIDOWS' TAKE ACTION

May 26, 1958
May 26, 1958

Table of Contents
May 26, 1958

X-Ray
Acknowledgments
Coming Events
Spectacle
Fitness
Baseball
Boxing
Tennis
  • James Van Alen, president of the National Lawn Tennis Hall of Fame at Newport and chairman of the time-honored Newport Invitation Tournament, here takes the witness stand and presents his radical ideas on streamlining tennis. Mr. Van Alen's career as a player dates back to his college days at Cambridge, England, where he captained the Oxford-Cambridge team which defeated the combined Yale-Harvard squad of 1924. Even today, at 55, he wields an aggressive and enthusiastic racket

Sporting Look
Motor Sports
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

'SAILING WIDOWS' TAKE ACTION

Tired of sitting prettily on the porches of Seattle's Corinthian Yacht Club, or of being the least accomplished and least patiently put-up-with members of their husbands' crews, 33 young matrons set uncertainly out to sea on Lake Washington the other day. As the lubberly wives of men who like to sail, they were taking direct action to win themselves an acknowledged share of elbow room in the family boat.

This is an article from the May 26, 1958 issue Original Layout

The teachers are women club members who already know how to handle boats. "Women learn better from other women than from their husbands," said a student. "Husbands are inclined to be impatient."

In five shore-school sessions the girls learned nomenclature, marline-spike seamanship, sailing to windward and other essentials. Then, on a fine May morning, the group had its first real sailing lesson on Lake Washington. Aside from a couple of near smotherings from jibs not briskly hoisted, things went amazingly well.

There was a man-overboard drill, designed to answer the question, "If your husband fell overboard, what would you do?" One dutiful wife reported she had rescued him all right, but only "after six tries and minus a head."

"That," said an instructor, "is why we use dummies. They float better than husbands."

Two seasons' experience has shown that, despite awkward beginnings, the ladies do make good sailors.

This is a growing idea. It could spread, and we bet that it will.

PHOTOASHORE, EXPERIENCED MRS. HOWARD ZECK CONDUCTS SPINNAKER DRILL WITH A MODELTHREE PHOTOSAFLOAT, THE LADIES FIND REAL RIGGING TO BE MORE OF A PUZZLE THAN THEY HAD EXPECTED, START SLOWLY BUT LEARN FAST