19TH HOLE: The readers take over

August 03, 1958

NO TIME FOR SWIMMERS
Sirs:
Your article on Chris von Saltza ("I Like to Beat 'Em," SI, July 21) was really great. I am one of many American swimmers who feel that swimming does not get enough publicity. The public wants us to swim and win titles, but who gets the glory? Baseball players, football players, golfers.
BRIANNA HARRINGTON
Detroit

Sirs:
I was very interested to read of the difficulties Chris von Saltza and her coach, George Harris, had in finding a place to train.

I have always thought that finding a place to work out was a problem that faced only New York City swimmers and divers. My problem is finding good diving boards. None of the springboards in the city are any good. They are so stiff and slant up at such an angle that not only is it impossible to dive well from them and practice proper technique, but I am afraid that people who don't know anything about diving will get hurt trying to use them.

Astoria swimming pool, here in New York, was the site of the Olympic tryouts a few years ago, and I don't think that the diving towers have been used since then. Diving from even the five-meter platform is prohibited to everyone, and the ladders have even been taken down. How can we ever try out for the Olympics unless someone gives us the chance to learn beforehand? I think it is just stupidity to let those towers stand there unused until the big event and then expect a good turnout and good results.

Best of luck to Chris von Saltza. I hope she will "beat 'em" in 1960.
EILEEN HIGGINBOTTOM
New York City

•Crowded conditions in New York City pools are responsible for regulations limiting the use of high-diving equipment, a situation not unique to New York and one that does not augur well for U.S. swimmers and the divers trying to "beat 'em" in the 1960 Olympics.—ED.

STAFF RECOMMENDATION
Sirs:
Jim Brosnan (The Rookie Psychiatrist, SI, July 21) sounds like a very educated man who knows more about our national pastime than just pitching.

In addition to his knowledge of baseball and interest in other things, he possesses writing ability. Why don't you sign him up?
DAVID NEMIROFF
Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y.

Sirs:
Jim Brosnan reflects, in his interesting diary, the thinking of the modern (well-informed, cultured, pessimistic, cynical, non-Christian) American mind.
JOHN NICOLINI
Oakland, Calif.

HAIL THE HOOP
Sirs:
How about an illustrated story on Frisbee, the greatest of all summer sports?
DON JANES
Tacoma, Wash.

•Will you settle for Hula-Hoop (page 28)?—ED.

PUP VS. TOT
Sirs:
Returning home on the 5:51, I read your interesting article, Educating the Family Dog (SI, July 14, 21). An excellent piece by people who have delved deeply into the subject.

Leaving the 5:51, I saw a tot about 5 years old with a cute black, totally untrained poodle race down the street to greet her pop. She was dragging the pup on a long leash. The animal finally got the idea and spurted on, but in a different direction. The child went on one side of a telephone pole; the poodle twice wrapped its leash around to the other. This almost choked the pup.

I do think there are many parents and children who should have the basic instructions in your articles. Even the pups would be grateful.
VINCENT H. RENDICH
Mamaroneck, N.Y.

AMATEUR VS. PRO
Sirs:
I sent for an entry blank for the Chicago Open golf tournament, which is replacing the Tam (as if any ever will), and was amazed to see that the amateur entry fee was equal to that of the pro ($50). Where is the logic behind this? The amateur cannot win any of the $50,000 being offered; a trophy is his consolation. Is this tournament only for the rich amateurs?

It is evident that the sponsors of this tournament are shunning the amateur by making the entry fee prohibitive and discouraging.
JOSEPH MALIK
Berwyn, Ill.

Sirs:
Recently I have seen a Charles Goren bridge bracelet that is very attractive, with small charms giving his point count for bidding. But I wonder, is it fair play? Somehow I feel that wearing the bracelet to a bridge party might be like using a crib sheet during final exams.
ANN CHASE
Brockton, Mass.

•It is both legal and acceptable etiquette, says Mr. Goren, to keep your hands above the table while wearing the bracelet (see above) during rubber bridge, but leave it at home for tournament play. For that matter, when you are that good, you will need no reminders.—ED.

PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)