FUN & GAMES: LEAFY ART
Sirs:
To one who frets, or one who grieves,
Or stops to think the ways that leaves
Can change their shapes, assume new forms,
Defying, what for leaves, are norms,
I urge, I strongly recommend,
(I tell you this as friend to friend)
You send your leaves, in all their guises,
Before the morning's new sun rises,
In boxes, trunks, by air or freight,
By boat, in parcel or in crate,
To that intrepid magazine
That gaily views the sporting scene.

The newest sport of all the lot—
To see a leaf as it is not.
CARROLL CLANCY
New York City

•Miss Clancy writes, it's plain to see, Of last week's lesson in botany; So gather leaves, then use your head And send your finished work to—ED.

FUN & GAMES: AND ROUND IT GOES
Sirs:
Where can the Hula-Hoop (WONDERFUL WORLD, Aug. 4) be secured?
ALBERT MILLER
Avella, Pa.

•To be the first in your neighborhood with a Hula-Hoop, write pronto to Wham-o Mfg. Co., 835 East El Monte Street, San Gabriel, Calif., for the retailer nearest you.—ED.

FUN & GAMES: GIRL'S BEST FRIEND
Sirs:
Please let me know where I may purchase the Goren bracelet illustrated in 19TH HOLE, Aug. 4.
GRACE M. HALL
Baltimore

•Either at your local jeweler's or by mail from Bridge Masters, 1151 Moore's Mill Road N.W., Atlanta 6, $4.95 postpaid.—ED.

SCRAM, SENATORS
Sirs:
The problem of baseball realignment is a very real one and is not being discussed at very great length currently. One sadly neglected facet of this problem is the plight of the Washington Senators, who obviously aren't making any money. Having done some serious research on this crisis, I wish to expound some possible solutions for the consideration of your readers.

The Senators must get out of Washington. Television may be a factor in their lack of attendance and consequent loss of money, but I feel the major influence is the fact that Washington simply is not a baseball town. Its population is too transient and cosmopolitan; it lacks an intrinsic home-town spirit. And even for the actual home folks there is just too much going on besides baseball in the hub of a nation of this importance. Baseball takes a back seat. Tt is nice to have the national sport represented in this nation's capital, but Cal Griffith and the Senators must be realistic; clinging to tradition won't get them out of the red or into the public's heart.

There are a number of large cities which would welcome the Senators with open arms. I have three principal ideas: 1) Move the franchise to Buffalo. This would mean negotiating with the Kansas City A's, who have a working agreement with the Buffalo Bisons. I think that could be effected in a short time. The Bisons could then move their International League franchise to Providence or Norfolk, either of which should be able to support them well. 2) Move to Houston. The Cardinals, who own this franchise, could be appeased by a cash offer and/or taking over Washington's Southern Association franchise in Chattanooga and move the Houston Buffs to Waco or Baton Rouge. 3) Move to Minneapolis. This would be almost a sure thing if the Red Sox could be talked out of their recently acquired farm club there. Then the Millers could move to Duluth and the St. Paul Saints to Grand Rapids or Oklahoma City.

These are only sample moves which, I feel, could prove lucrative for all concerned. There are other large cities—Dallas, Miami, Seattle—that might prove just as profitable. The important point is, get the Senators out of Washington.
CLYDE DAWSON
Fort Stanton, N. Mex.

SALUTE THE SAILFISH
Sirs:
I was completely intrigued with your recent article about Sailfish (SI, July 21). Being a novice to boating, and wishing to get my feet wet in a financially painless way, I would appreciate any information you might have concerning a national club or association for Sailfishers; any such organizations in or near Kansas City; companies who manufacture the boats, either in complete form or in kits.
FREDERIC T. NORTON
Merriam, Kans.

•Mr. Norton and the scores of other prospective Sailfishers who have written to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should write to Alex Bryan, designer and manufacturer, at Alcort, Inc., P.O. Box 1345, Waterbury, Conn., for the name of the nearest dealer. There is as yet no national Sailfish association (it is not a registered class boat), but there are many regional clubs whose members are quick to spot other sailing surfers.—ED.

Sirs:
Kudos to you for your picture story on Sailfish, but you didn't say nearly enough. These are remarkable craft.

While you pictured them as primarily a boat for small inland lakes, a group of us have a fleet of eight or so which we have sailed in gusty, treacherous Lake Michigan for the past four years (with crash boat in attendance, of course).

They plane at 10 knots. They can overtake an Arrow or similar 16- to 18-foot boat on a broad reach when the wind is steady at 15 mph or better. In light winds you can sail them lying supine to cut down wind resistance. They can be put out through the surf in a strong northeast wind while other, trailer-mounted boats have to stand idle. Then you can ride them back onto the beach atop a breaker under full sail.

A class of Sailfish was entered for the first time last year in the Chicago Daily News Regatta and passed dinghies and sailing canoes in races around the same course.

A Sailfish is tricky, and sailors with considerable years of experience in small craft often go to pieces first time aboard. As one Mackinac veteran said, perhaps overenthusiastically, "Brother, if you can race these things you can race anything!"
ROBERT G. WHITE
Highland Park, Ill.

FUN & GAMES: OH, BRING BACK MY BONNIE TO ME...
Sirs:
A friend of ours recently "graduated" from Bonnie Prudden's course at the Institute in White Plains before going off on her summer vacation. Little did she realize there is no escaping Bonnie or physical fitness. I thought that Bonnie's mailed directives (see below) were something your fitness-conscious readers might enjoy seeing.
BETTY SMITH
Edgartown, Mass.

PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)