Easterners are a hardy breed, alternately drenched, baked, quick-frozen and finally thawed in that area stretching roughly from Maine to Maryland and from the Atlantic seaboard to the western border of Pennsylvania. Is there any wonder then that the game of football they conceived one crisp November day 89 years ago has been able to survive four wars, various depressions and a severe case of de-emphasitis?

Eastern football was the best in the land for the first 50 years, but soon the superiority moved westward and southward. Still, the game owes its popularity and prestige to such pioneers as Princeton, Rutgers, Columbia, Yale, Harvard and Pennsylvania, former powers which were later among the first to tone down the game and keep the football tail from wagging the academic dog.

Today most of the East plays a low-keyed version of football which frowns on spring practice and special athletic scholarships for players, and it limits its opponents to those who do likewise. As a result, it is rarely possible to compare the best eastern teams to those in other areas. But it matters little to the Yales and the Harvards and the Browns and the Vermonts and the majority of other Easterners what the world thinks of their football. Watching the alma mater with blanket, flask and date is all that these fans ask of the game.

Proof of this lies in the fact that the East—which in 1957 produced only one bowl team, Navy, and hasn't had a national champion since Army in 1945—last year enjoyed a 6.6% increase in attendance, highest in the land. Folks in this part of the country love football and want to see it played by bona fide students, win or lose, and without the firing of coaches and hangings in effigy so prevalent elsewhere. As pioneers of the game, they hope they are setting a good precedent that the rest of the colleges will eventually follow. They like to think they see good football, too, and point to such expected powers as Army and Navy, Holy Cross, Princeton, Penn State and Pittsburgh. These and a few others will engage in a wide-open battle for the Lambert Trophy, which is awarded each year to the best team in the East, chosen by a vote of coaches, sportswriters and sportscasters.

Navy, which won the Lambert Trophy last year, along with a 20-7 victory over Rice in the Cotton Bowl, may very well keep it despite the fact that a lot of last year's best players have graduated. The Midshipmen are highly optimistic over their chances, and one big reason is a somewhat obscure quarterback, named Joe Tranchini. The reason Tranchini is obscure is that he wasted the first year of his eligibility sitting on the bench and watching another Navy quarterback named Tom Forrestal hog all the glory. Forrestal, it just so happens, was one of the best of his trade in the whole country. Tranchini, they will tell you down at Annapolis, can do everything a good quarterback should do and has displayed some of Forrestal's cool-headed daring. Even if the Middies enjoy another good year (they lost only two games in the last two years), a second straight bowl trip is not in the cards. Athletic Director Slade Cutter says Navy "definitely will not accept any postseason bowl games because the boys lost too much study time last year practicing for the Rice game."

Perhaps one reason for Navy's phenomenal success is the football philosophy of Coach Eddie Erdelatz, who claims that, after all, it is just a game and should be enjoyed as such. "We'll have a ball—we always do," Coach Erdelatz was heard to say recently, "I don't believe in all that high pressure stuff. I have the simplicity system. It's a few plays and few defenses. It has worked out all right."

Sometimes one suspects that Erdelatz may have just a bit of his tongue in his cheek when he speaks for publication, particularly in the following vein. "I tell my players there's no pressure on them to play, and if they can't have some fun to turn in their suits. No scholarship is at stake. The coaches also have fun. We have no 6 a.m. staff meetings, and there's plenty of time for golf in the afternoon two or three times a week. And no night sessions." The Middies, one might say, are so happy playing football that they literally dance while scrimmaging. It will be remembered that the men of Annapolis created quite a stir when they first used their so-called jitterbug defense.

"We don't anchor our men in concrete," Erdelatz explains when discussing this tactic. "They are moving around like jitterbugs before the ball is snapped. So far, nobody has found the solution to this defense."

In contrast to the light-hearted attitude of Erdelatz, Coach Earl Blaik of Army is a stern purveyor of the football doctrine, a man who demands perfection and often gets something approaching it from his teams. Under his direction, Army has twice been named the national champion in the annual Associated Press poll, and it has won the Lambert Trophy six times. His Black Knights have completed five unbeaten seasons, run up winning streaks of 32 and 28 games and have averaged less than two defeats a season. Perhaps Blaik's greatest coaching effort came in 1953, when he rebuilt an Army squad that was decimated by the wholesale dismissal of players involved in the unhappy cribbing scandal. The number of head coaches developed by Coach Blaik is now at 13, an alltime high in the profession. And in his 25 years of coaching, 18 of them at West Point, the Colonel has developed 26 first-team All-America players, including that extraordinary pair of backs, Glenn Davis and Doc Blanchard, who received this distinction three years running during the mid-1940s.

This year, Blaik has another pair of backs who will surely bring back memories of Blanchard and Davis. They are Bob Anderson, an All-America choice of many in his sophomore year last season, and Captain Pete Dawkins. This may well be the best pair of starting backs in the country, a combination which scored 25 of Army's 37 touchdowns last fall. Dawkins, a childhood victim of polio, is an exceptionally courageous and dedicated young man who is not only the team captain but also president of the senior class and the seventh-ranking scholar in his class.

Pittsburgh appears among the strongest teams in the East, but the Panthers will have an almost impossible time proving it with the likes of Notre Dame, Michigan State, Army and UCLA on their schedule. Coach Johnny Michelosen, who has long been heckled for his conservative football strategy—something of a Pitt tradition stemming from the great days of Coach Jock Sutherland—has decided to adopt a flashier offense and thereby take the emphasis off Pitt's old bone-crunching, head-banging style. One reason for this change is that Michelosen's linemen are smaller than usual. They have been for several years.

In the still-lively Ivy League, Princeton is favored to repeat its championship—and perhaps even capture the Lambert Trophy—despite threatening noises out of Dartmouth, Pennsylvania and Yale. Coach Dick Colman has about everything he wants in the way of players, but he would like to find a solution to the newest guessing game of the year—whether to kick for one point after the touchdown or to run or pass for two points. "I'm going to invest in an applause meter," says Colman, another of those coaches who talks with his tongue in cheek. "Whenever we score a touchdown I'll ask for a display of fan sentiment. The fans will decide, and the coach will be off the hook."

The East will be able to boast of many excellent backs but none better than Anderson of Army, Quarterback Tommy Greene of Holy Cross and Halfback Dave Kasperian of Penn State. Last year, Anderson, a Floridian with truly amazing speed, not only smashed Glenn Davis' old rushing record at Army but also ranked second in the nation with his 14 touchdowns. As a sophomore he enjoyed perhaps his finest day when he scored three touchdowns and passed for a fourth against a strong Utah team. Dr. Eddie Anderson of Holy Cross, whose 33 years of experience make him the senior coach among the nation's major colleges, regards Greene as the finest quarterback in the country. He barely missed the national leadership in total offense last year when he was hobbled by rain and mud in the final game of the season against Boston College. Even so, he passed for more yards per game than any other major college player. Dr. Anderson also speaks highly of Kasperian, a 26-year-old ex-paratrooper from Worcester, Mass., who didn't play football until he was a high school senior. Anderson says of Kasperian: "He has a blowtorch for a heart. There may be players in the East who have greater natural ability, but none has more drive or courage."

It is this kind of athlete who makes the eastern football public satisfied with the game as it sees it—and to heck with national championships.

AMHERST
Amherst, Mass.

COLORS: Purple and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 7, lost 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13 of 23
WATCH FOR: Hard-driving Halfback Jack Close

THE DOPE: The Lord Jeffs will have little to shout about after a season marred only by a loss to Williams. Coach John McLaughry has lost 10 letterman, including star Quarterback Tom Gorman, and has no promising sophomores. Bob McLean, who has little experience, will call signals for a better-than-average backfield of Co-captain Jack Close, Terry Farina and Fullback John Deligeorges. Halfback Close was leading ground gainer last year, averaging 7.5 yards per carry. Line is not as fully seasoned and McLaughry is so short of material that many men will play two positions. End Joe Shields is a capable pass receiver, but Amherst has no outstanding passer. Another mainstay is Co-captain Charles Rideout, a solid center and linebacker. Al Wentzel is a durable tackle, whom McLaughry calls "an outstanding lineman." The Lord Jeffs are weaker than last year but they should enjoy a winning season with Close back. Even with the development of McLean at quarterback, Amherst is given little chance of taking the Little Three championship from Williams.

[originallink:10486101:41499]

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

Springfield College (33-14)

OCT. 4

at Union College (51-0)

OCT. 11

at Bowdoin (58-14)

OCT. 18

Coast Guard (42-0)

OCT. 25

at Wesleyan (21-0)

NOV. 1

Tufts (19-6)

NOV. 8

at Trinity (40-6)

NOV. 15

Williams (14-39)

ARMY
West Point, N.Y.

COLORS: Black, gold and gray
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1957 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13 of 21
WATCH FOR: Touchdown twins Bob Anderson and Pete Dawkins

THE DOPE: The Cadets have lost eight of the 11 men who started in the Navy game, including Quarterback Dave Bourland, Fullback Bin Barta and Center Jim Kernan. But Coach Earl Blaik still boasts the best set of halfbacks in the country, All-America Bob Anderson and Captain Pete Dawkins. Anderson topped Glenn Davis' rushing record at the Point, and he ranked second in the nation with his 14 touchdowns. Dawkins trailed closely with 11. Blaik faces the job of manufacturing another quarterback, however. Best bet is Joe Caldwell, sidelined by a broken jaw a year ago but potentially the best passer available. Harry Walters replaces Barta at fullback. Line positions are wide open. Chuck Lytle is a probable running mate for Guard Bob Novogratz, only line survivor of the Navy battle. Ed Bogdonas and Maurice Hilliard will play tackle, and Don Usry and Bill Carpenter may start at ends. Guard Bill Rowe has been converted to center. With quarterback a question mark, the line green and shallow and an over-all lack of depth, Coach Blaik promises "a more open game."

SEPT. 27

South Carolina (no game)

OCT. 4

Perm Stale (27-13)

OCT. 11

at Notre Dame (21-23)

OCT. 18

Virginia (20-12)

OCT. 25

at Pittsburgh (29-13)

NOV. 1

Colgate (53-7)

NOV. 8

at Rice (no game)

NOV. 15

Villanova (no game)

NOV. 29

Navy at Philadelphia (0-14)

BOSTON COLLEGE
Chestnut Hill, Mass.

COLORS: Maroon and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 32
WATCH FOR: The aerial antics of Don Allard and John Flanagan

THE DOPE: The Eagles should prove to be one of the strongest teams in Coach Mike Holovak's eight years at University Heights. With 21 lettermen returning, Holovak has experience at every position but fullback, and that will be handled by outstanding Sophomore Frank Robotti, a devastating 200-pound runner. Holovak, who seasoned his troops by alternating two units last year, will have a stronger, faster team than the squad which lost only to Navy and Holy Cross in '57. Don Allard, who passed for 1,039 yards last season, is back to direct Holovak's aerial game. He was Navy's all-opponent quarterback. Alan Miller will be senior ball carrier, and the other halfback post will be taken by Jim Col-clough, who averaged four yards per carry and scored seven touchdowns last season. The line, strong, big and fast, will be anchored by a pair of outstanding ends in John Flanagan and Don Tosi. The Eagles should easily put together a winning season despite a rugged schedule which includes newcomers Syracuse, Miami, Clemson and College of Pacific.

SEPT. 20

Scranton (no game)

SEPT. 27

at Syracuse (no game)

OCT. 4

Villanova (12-9)

OCT. 18

at Marquette (19-14)

OCT. 25

Miami (no game)

NOV. 1

College of Pacific (no game)

NOV. 8

Detroit (20-16)

NOV. 15

Boston U. (27-2)

NOV. 22

at Clemson (no game)

DEC. 6

Holy Cross (0-14)

BOSTON UNIVERSITY
Boston

COLORS: Scarlet and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 3
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22 of 32
WATCH FOR: Spectacular running of Halfbacks Paul Cancro and Johnny Maio

THE DOPE: The Terriers will play their toughest schedule since 1947, but they could pull off at least four victories with help from a good sophomore crop. Coach Steve Sinko has lost 10 lettermen but just four were starters, all on the line. Most significant of these was Jack Regan, a mountainous end who was one of the Terriers' leading pass receivers. Jim Kenney and Phil Kearney will fill the gap left by Regan and Sal Schiazza. Sinko's chief asset is a talented backfield composed of rough-riding Backs Paul Cancro and Johnny Maio, Fullback Jimmy Dean and diminutive Emo DiNitto. Cancro set a BU rushing record for sophs last season. Maio, who gained close to five yards per carry and ranked 10th in the country on punt returns, will be sidelined the first two games of the season because of an ankle fracture. DiNitto, a cool little general who stands just 5 feet 8 inches in cleats, completed 41 % of his passes, six of them for touchdowns. This same combination averaged 24.5 points a game last year. If the line is equal to the task, the Terriers should cut quite a path in the East.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

at Massachusetts (66-6)

OCT. 4

Navy (no game)

OCT. 11

at West Virginia (6-46)

OCT. 18

Penn State (no game)

OCT. 25

at Holy Cross (35-28)

NOV. 1

William & Mary (no game)

NOV. 7

Syracuse, N (20-27)

NOV. 15

at Boston College (2-27)

NOV. 22

at Connecticut (32-7)

BROWN
Providence

COLORS: Brown and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T with flankers
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14 of 26
WATCH FOR: Passing of Frank Finney, strong running by Paul Choquetle

THE DOPE: The Bruins will be hard-pressed to improve on their fourth-place position of last season. Losses in the line are heavy, and Coach Al Kelley has a thin sophomore crop. Still, barring serious injuries, the Bruins could be Ivy League spoilers. Kelley has one of the league's top linemen in his center and captain, Don Warburton, a fine quarterback and passer in Frank Finney and a promising fullback in Paul Choquette. The three lettermen at halfback—George Gor-godian, Jack McTigue and Dick Beland—are seasoned by two years of heavy duty. Finney is regarded as the best defensive back in the league. He is a good running threat and has a two-year record of 99 completions in 208 pass attempts, good for 12.6 yards per completion and eight touchdowns. Warburton, an impressive linebacker, was all-Ivy center last year, while Choquette was the team's leading rusher. Although the line is generally weak, the end squad should be improved with the return of five lettermen, including Bill Traub, out with a leg ailment last season.

SEPT. 27

at Columbia (20-23)

OCT. 4

Yale (21-20)

OCT. 11

Dartmouth (0-35)

OCT. 18

at Pennsylvania (20-7)

OCT. 25

Rhode Island (21-0)

NOV. 1

at Princeton (0-7)

NOV. 8

Cornell (6-13)

NOV. 15

at Harvard (33-6)

NOV. 27

Colgate (33-7)

BUCKNELL
Lewisburg, Pa.

COLORS: Orange and blue
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14 of 25
WATCH FOR: Jim Brady, best of the Bison linemen

THE DOPE: The Bisons have been branded with a new system by a new coach and are hopeful of improving on their mediocre record of last season. Former Penn All-America Bob Odell, who has been backfield coach at Wisconsin the past nine years, takes over the herd from Harry Lawrence and must count heavily upon juniors and sophomores. Only two seniors, in fact, Tackles Dick Hunn and Lewis Hart, are on the entire first unit, although four of the juniors were regular starters last year. The holdovers are Halfback Charles Apgar, Quarterback Dennis Cox, Center Larry Mathias and End Jim Brady. Sophomores make up the rest of the backfield, with Martin Pope at halfback, Mickey Melberger replacing Bob Fitzsimmons at full and Paul Terhes alternating with Cox at quarterback. End Doug Forsyth and Guards Charles Negron and George Salinger complete the starting forward wall. Odell is green in the backfield and lacks over-all depth, but folks out Lewisburg way figure the Bisons can trample just about everybody but Colgate, Rutgers and Delaware.

SEPT. 27

Gettysburg, N, at Hershey (0-19)

OCT. 4

Carnegie Tech (18-7)

OCT. 11

Colgate (0-82)

OCT. 18

al Rutgers (no game)

OCT. 25

Lafayette (13-35)

NOV. 1

Lehigh (0-27)

NOV. 8

at Temple (19-6)

NOV. 15

at Delaware (13-34)

NOV. 22

al Buffalo (no game)

COLGATE
Hamilton, N.Y.

COLOR: Maroon
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17 of 25
WATCH FOR: The aerial teamwork of Ray Harding and Al Jamison

THE DOPE: The Red Raiders will lean heavily on sophomores to bolster an offense which netted only three victories and 13 touchdowns last season. Coach Fred Rice is hurting particularly at center, tackle and right halfback. His returnees are headed by End Al Jamison, the East's leading pass receiver with 33 catches for 420 yards and six touchdowns. With him is Quarterback Ray Harding, a ranking passer who connected for 762 yards and seven touchdowns. The Red Raiders have pretty good size up front (213-pound average), speed and passing ability in the backfield. They hope to run more with Halfbacks Doug Ammon and Dick Randall (a converted end) and Fullback Don Zimmerman, who is light but speedy. Sophomore Hal Jackson is being touted as a real find. Another sophomore, Jacque MacKinnon, is one of the tallest halfbacks (6 feet 4 inches) in the game. Colgate has good potential and, barring another plague of ailments that all but ruined it last season, should give a very good account of itself despite a rather tough schedule.

SEPT. 27

at Cornell (14-13)

OCT. 4

Rutgers (6-48)

OCT. 11

at Bucknell (32-0)

OCT. 18

at Princeton (12-10)

OCT. 25

at Yale (0-20)

NOV. 1

at Army (7-53)

NOV. 8

Holy Cross (no game)

NOV. 15

at Syracuse (6-34)

NOV. 27

at Brown (7-33)

COLUMBIA
New York City

COLORS: Light blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 1, lost 8
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 12 of 22
WATCH FOR: The running pass by Quarterback Dick Donelli

THE DOPE: Columbia will be a better team this year, according to Coach Buff Donelli, "because we can't be any worse." The Lions lack experience in the backfield with only two lettermen returning, Donelli's quarterback son Dick and Halfback Harvey Brookins. But the Lions have a talented sophomore crop, a good line and a quarterback who not only now ranks as the top passer in the Ivy League but who can run and is a defensive standout. The 21-year-old senior ranked second only to Yale's now departed Dick Winterbauer as a passer last year, with 52 completions in 96 attempts good for 589 yards and five touchdowns. Young Donelli, 20 pounds heavier at 195, will run more this year and use the running pass. His favorite targets will be End Ted Graske and Brookins. Don Savini will be Coach Donelli's replacement for the Lions' leading runner last year, Halfback Brad Howard, while Henry Norment or Bruce Johnson will draw the fullback job. Donelli and Brookins, behind Tackles Ed Eschenbaum and Brian Dennehy, should spell trouble for some of the Ivy favorites.

SEPT. 27

Brown (23-20)

OCT. 4

at Princeton (6-47)

OCT. 11

Yale (0-19)

OCT. 18

Harvard (6-19)

OCT. 25

at Buffalo (no game)

NOV. 1

Cornell (0-8)

NOV. 8

at Dartmouth (0-7)

NOV. 15

at Pennsylvania (6-28)

NOV. 22

at Rutgers (7-26)

CONNECTICUT
Storrs, Conn.

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T, unbalanced line
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 4, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13 of 24
WATCH FOR: Halfback Larry Day, all over the field

THE DOPE: The U Conns had to share the Bean Pot—emblematic of the Yankee Conference Championship—with Rhode Island last year, but they may wind up with all the gravy this time. Coach Bob Ingalls has lost eight starters from last year's Yankee Conference title squad, but he has proven replacements and an outstanding selection from the freshman team. The Huskies' main strength will be in the backfield where Larry Day and five other lettermen return. Halfback Day was the Huskies' top offensive threat, gaining 626 yards and scoring 33 points. Quarterback Gerry D'Avolio and Fullback Norm Chaban also are back. The U Conns are strong in the middle with Co-captain Paul Scagnelli at center and Bill Wallner at guard. Scagnelli is a 60-minute man who ranks with the best in the East. End Barry O'Connell and Tackle Joe Llodra are added seasoning. Connecticut was the toughest defensive team in the conference last year, holding four opponents to a total of one touchdown. They may be a little more porous but should go all the way for the third straight year.

1958 SCHEDULE

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

Springfield (14-19)

SEPT. 27

at Yale (0-27)

OCT. 4

American International (no game)

OCT. 11

at Massachusetts (19-6)

OCT. 18

Maine (19-0)

OCT. 25

at Delaware (13-9)

NOV. 1

at New Hampshire (18-0)

NOV. 8

Northeastern (46-14)

NOV. 15

at Rhode Island (0-0)

NOV. 22

Boston U. (7-32)

CORNELL
Ithaca, N.Y.

COLORS: Carnelian and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Modified T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15 of 28
WATCH FOR: Improved line play and a better passing game

THE DOPE: The Big Red should be a greatly improved team this season, particularly on defense. Lettermen are back at all line positions and Coach Lefty James's only problem up front is the development of a strong linebacking center. While strong on guards and tackles, James is short on experienced halfbacks. His chief loss here was Bob McAniff, the Ivy League's leading rusher last season. Lettermen Terry Wilson and John Webster will carry the load. Fullback Bob Hazzard, this year's captain, may be moved to halfback because of his great speed. Phil Taylor will likely succeed him at fullback. Tom Skypeck, the team's top scorer last year, should blossom as a T quarterback. The 6-foot-2, 190-pound senior showed great improvement late last season. He's a powerful runner but has not realized his potential as a passer. Most promising sophomore is Marcello Tino, who was impressive as both a runner and passer while quarterbacking the freshman team. The Big Red expects a winning season and could finish a strong second.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

Colgate (13-14)

OCT. 4

Harvard (20-6)

OCT. 11

at Syracuse (0-34)

OCT. 18

at Yale (7-18)

OCT. 25

Princeton (14-47)

NOV. 1

at Columbia (8-0)

NOV. 8

at Brown (13-6)

NOV. 15

Dartmouth (19-20)

NOV. 27

at Pennsylvania (6-14)

DARTMOUTH
Hanover, N. H.

COLORS: Oak green and white
BASIC OFFENSE: V—i.e., T with fullback as blocker between guard and tackle
1957 RECORD: Won 7, lost 1, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 18 of 28
WATCH FOR: The running and passing of Halfback John Crouthamel

THE DOPE: After their most successful season in 20 years, the Indians are faced with a major rebuilding problem. Five of last year's 11 starters are gone and 14 in all have been graduated from the team that lost only the Ivy League title game, to Princeton, on the last day of the season. Coach Bob Blackman will especially miss Captain Joe Palermo, Dartmouth's first All-America in 20 years; pass-catching Dave Moss and Quarterback Dave Bradley. Key holdovers in the line are Captain Al Krutsch at guard, Tackle Dave Bathrick and End Scott Palmer. Other line spots will be manned by either reserves or members of a weak freshman team which won only one game out of a six-game schedule last year. Quarterbacking will be handled by Bill Gundy, the East's leading punter last year, while understudying Bradley. Brian Hepburn will return to fullback and Jim Burke and John Crouthamel will handle the halfback slots. Injured returnees include Center Bob Virostek and Halfback Jim Mueller. The Indians will be strong but not strong enough.

SEPT. 27

Lafayette (no game)

OCT. 4

Pennsylvania (6-8)

OCT. 11

at Brown (35-0)

OCT. 18

Holy Cross (14-7)

OCT. 25

at Harvard (26-0)

NOV. 1

at Yale (14-14)

NOV. 8

Columbia (7-0)

NOV. 15

at Cornell (20-19)

NOV. 22

at Princeton (14-34)

DELAWARE
Newark, Del.

COLORS: Blue and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won-4, lost 3
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14 of 28
WATCH FOR: Spirited defensive play of Mark Hurm and Bob Jones

THE DOPE: If. the Blue Hens improve on their 4-3 record, it will be due in part to the heavy losses of their opponents. Though Coach Dave Nelson has lost Quarterback Larry Catuzzi and 13 other lettermen, these losses will not hurt overall team strength as much as might be imagined. Nelson will rely on Gampy Pellegrini, his best passer, and former End Karl Frantz to direct the offense. Pellegrini's arm will give the Blue Hens a more potent aerial attack than last year. Veteran Fullback John Bowman may become Jack Turner's running mate at halfback, while Tony Suravitch, a fine breakaway runner, takes over Bowman's old job. Captain Bob Jones will be back as guard with Urban Bowman, and Mark Hurm, a defensive standout, will return to center. John Mordas and Ray Klapinsky will operate at tackle and the ends will be manned by Bob Reeder and Al Huey. Sophomores Mike Heinecken and Dick Broadbent provide strength at the end positions, but the rest of the line is shallow. Blue Hens' running game should be more consistent and passing improved.

SEPT. 27

at Lehigh (14-19)

OCT. 4

at Temple (71-7)

OCT. 11

Lafayette (no game)

OCT. 18

at New Hampshire (59-6)

OCT. 25

Connecticut (9-13)

NOV. 1

Rutgers (23-19)

NOV. 8

Massachusetts (no game)

NOV. 15

Bucknell (34-13)

HARVARD
Cambridge, Mass.

COLOR: Crimson
BASIC OFFENSE: Balanced T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 5
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 25 of 29
WATCH FOR: Slashing tackles of Captain Bob Shaunessy

THE DOPE: The Crimson had several key men out of action during the two horrendous defeats it suffered at the end of last season. But with these men back in action and the entire team acclimated to Coach John Yovicsin's balanced T formation, Harvard should spell trouble for some of the Ivies. The opposition is rating the Crimson the most improved team in the league and a dark horse contender. The line will feature two outstanding tackles in Captain Bob Shaunessy and Pete Briggs, and Center Bob Foster. Foster and Quarterback Ron Johanson made the surprise jump from junior varsity to starring roles last fall. Dick McLaughlin, who completed over 50% of his passes, is also available for signal calling. Chet (The Jet) Boulris, after an excellent sophomore start—he led the Crimson in total offense with 402 yards—will be one of the league's best backs. Harvard lacks depth, but with only four lettermen lost and help from a freshman team that lost only to Princeton last year, the Crimson may surprise. The opposition is tabbing Harvard as the team to watch.

SEPT. 27

Buffalo (no game)

OCT. 4

at Cornell (6-20)

OCT. 11

Lehigh (no game)

OCT. 18

at Columbia (19-6)

OCT. 25

Dartmouth (0-26)

NOV. 1

Pennsylvania (13-6)

NOV. 8

at Princeton (20-28)

NOV. 15

Brown (6-33)

NOV. 22

Yale (0-54)

HOLY CROSS
Worcester, Mass.

COLOR: Royal purple
BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple T
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 3, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23 of 30
WATCH FOR: The passing wizardry of Tom Greene

THE DOPE: Coach Eddie Anderson not only has 23 lettermen returning but can expect help from the Crusaders' third consecutive unbeaten freshman team. His brightest hopes for a winning season are Quarterback Tom Greene and Guard Jim Healy. Greene, a 6-foot-l, 190-pounder from Maryland, missed the national total offense crown by 63 yards last fall, settling for 1,381 yards. He passed for 11 touchdowns, led the team with 45 points and was responsible for 16 of 28 touchdowns scored in 1957. Captain Healy is billed as the best Holy Cross lineman of all time, was picked on five all-opponent teams last year. Anderson rates Healy and Vince Promuto the best guard combo in the country. Anderson may have trouble replacing Center Al Turrin, and reserves will have to move into tackle, but the Crusaders are knee deep in experienced ends. The return of veterans like Charlie Pacunas and Dave Stecchi gives HC a solid passing attack, and Anderson hopes the running of backs like Ed Hayes, Johnny Freitas and Joe Stagnone will provide better balance.

SEPT. 27

at Pittsburgh (no game)

OCT. 4

Syracuse (20-19)

OCT. 18

at Dartmouth (7-14)

OCT. 25

Boston U. (28-35)

NOV. 1

Dayton (32-6)

NOV. 8

at Colgate (no game)

NOV. 15

at Penn State (10-14)

NOV. 22

Marquette (26-7)

DEC. 6

at Boston College (14-0)

LAFAYETTE
Easton, Pa.

COLORS: Maroon and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15 of 28
WATCH FOR: A light but speedy team, lacking topnotch reserves

THE DOPE: Jim McConlogue, the first "local" man to coach the Leopards in their 77-year grid history, inherits a small but fast team completely lacking depth. Lafayette has lost its leading passer and scorer, Quarterback Joe Bozik, and a couple of 19-year-old juniors, Merle Bain-bridge and Wayne Cipriani, will get the chance to fill in. With them in the back-field will be Don Nikles, one of the East's better fullbacks, and Halfbacks Don Westmass and Marion Vujevich. The linemen will average 189 pounds and will be held together by Captain Don Dilley, who was switched from end to tackle, and his running mate, Gordon (Hoot) Gibson, another converted end. The ends will be Lafayette's strongest position. Tom Fisher, Joel Gustafson and Don Wooten are all fast and good blockers. The halfback posts will be manned by a veteran force which includes Don Westmass, Marion Vujevich, George Bendere and Tom Moyer, all of whom are juniors. The Leopards are shallow and trying to rebuild, but they may ring up a winning season in the process.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

at Dartmouth (no game)

OCT. 4

Muhlenberg (20-13)

OCT. 11

at Delaware (no game)

OCT. 18

Temple (12-13)

OCT. 25

at Bucknell (35-13)

NOV. 1

Gettysburg (20-46)

NOV. 8

at Rutgers (19-34)

NOV. 15

at Tufts (no game)

NOV. 22

Lehigh (13-26)

LEHIGH
Bethlehem, Pa.

COLORS: Brown and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 8, lost 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 10 of 22
WATCH FOR: Leaping, diving pass-catching of End Joe Wenzel

THE DOPE: With Dan Nolan gone to the Washington Redskins, the Engineers may have to crate and ship back the Lambert Cup, symbol of eastern small-college football supremacy. Five other starters from the 1957 squad, including Fullback Walt Pijawka, have graduated with the man who directed Lehigh's split-T attack for a 22-5 record for the past three seasons. Coach Bill Leckonby is pinning his hopes on Sophomore Quarterback Bob Scheu, a left-handed slinger who has the same relaxed manner of play and raw-boned frame of Nolan. Scheu's chief targets will be Joe Wenzel, a 6-foot-2, 190-pound standout, and Dave Nevil, who between them brought down 41 passes last season for 582 yards. The only other line starters back are Center Tom DeFlavis and Tackle John Stanley. Charles Burger, who carried for an average 4.5 yards, is the only backfield returnee. John O'Ryan will play opposite Burger, and Ron Lauretti will play fullback. Without Nolan's run-pass ability and daring, Engineers will rely more on basic drive plays and pitchouts.

SEPT. 27

Delaware (19-14)

OCT. 4

at Gettysburg (20-7)

OCT. 11

at Harvard (no game)

OCT. 18

Western Reserve (27-6)

OCT. 25

Rutgers (13-7)

NOV. 1

at Bucknell (27-0)

NOV. 8

VMI at Lynchburg, Va. (7-12)

NOV. 15

Buffalo (27-7)

NOV. 22

at Lafayette (26-13)

MAINE
Orono, Me.

COLORS: Pale blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 3
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 12 of 26
WATCH FOR: An emphasis on defense, ball handling of Bob Pickett

THE DOPE: The Black Bears may lack enough depth and experience to seriously threaten Connecticut and Rhode Island this year, especially since they will be the only team in the conference fighting everybody on the block. Coach Harold Westerman has lost his first five guards, three hard-running backs and his most valuable player, Tackle Will Tarazewich. He gets no help either from a poor freshman squad. The return of veteran Ends Ed Manson and Niles Nelson will give Maine a better defense than offense. Jack Welch will be among the replacements for departed Backs Dave Rand, Captain Vernon Moulton and Charles Thibodeau. Bob Pickett, a fine ball handler but only an average passer, will do the quarterbacking, and light but speedy John Theriault will operate at fullback. Westerman is concentrating on the development of place-kickers, a department he feels has taken on new significance under the present rules. On the whole it appears that Maine would be content to fare as well during the coming season as it did in '57.

SEPT. 20

Massachusetts (no game)

SEPT. 27

Rhode Island (7-25)

OCT. 4

at Vermont (49-0)

OCT. 11

New Hampshire (7-0)

OCT. 18

at Connecticut (0-19)

OCT. 25

Bates (0-7)

NOV. 1

Colby (14-13)

NOV. 8

at Bowdoin (40-0)

MASSACHUSETTS
Amherst, Mass.

COLORS: Maroon and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 1, lost 5, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 12 of 20
WATCH FOR: The bull rushes of Fullback Ed Richardson

THE DOPE: This could be Coach Charlie O'Rourke's best season since he took over the Redmen in 1952. O'Rourke retains most of his linemen and three starting backs, has the cream of a very successful freshman crop. Billy Maxwell or Sophomores Jack Conway and Jim Hickman will try to fill the cleats of Quarterback Ronnie Blume. Maxwell was the team's leading passer and kicker. Halfbacks Gerry Walls, Armand Sabourin and Billy Reynolds give the Redmen needed speed, and Fullback Ed Richardson, high scorer last year, provides the power. Sabourin is a good breakaway runner and, teamed with Reynolds, gives O'Rourke the fastest halfback combination in the Yankee Conference. Massachusetts is deep from tackle to tackle, with Guard Lou Varichione the outstanding lineman. While the running is good, the passing needs improvement. The Redmen could win five or six games and jell into a conference champion. One thing sure around Amherst: the Redmen will be much better than last season's once-triumphant team.

SEPT. 20

at Maine (no game)

SEPT. 27

Boston U. (6-66)

OCT. 4

at Brandeis (7-47)

OCT. 11

Connecticut (6-19)

OCT. 18

at Rhode Island (13-27)

OCT. 25

Northeastern (no game)

NOV. 8

at Delaware (no game)

NOV. 15

New Hampshire (7-7)

NAVY
Annapolis, Md.

COLORS: Blue and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 9, lost 1, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13 of 30
WATCH FOR: Bulldozing Reifsnyder; fast, hard-hitting backs led by Joe Tranchini

THE DOPE: This is a rebuilding year for the Middies, but they were in the same straits in 1954 when they ran off an 8-2 record and a Sugar Bowl victory over Mississippi. Coach Eddie Erdelatz has only Fullback Ray Wellborn, Center Milan Moncilovich, Guard George Frit-zinger and 234-pound Tackle Bob Reifsnyder back from the team that finished last season with a 9-1-1, smashing Rice in the Cotton Bowl. His losses include All-America Quarterback Tom Forrestal, star Halfbacks Ned Oldham and Harry Hurst, End Pete Jokanovich, Tackle Tony Anthony and Guard Tony Stremic. Although shallow in the line, Erdelatz is not hurting for backs. Junior Joe Tranchini, an excellent passer and defensive player, replaces Forrestal; Captain Dick Dagampat, an outstanding fullback out with injuries most of last season, starts at halfback, and Reserve Dick Zembrzuski replaces Oldham. Also available for backfield duty are Roland Brandquist and Bob Correll. Most promising newcomers are Fullback Joe Matalavage and Halfback Joe Bellino.

SEPT. 27

William & Mary (33-6)

OCT. 4

at Boston (no game)

OCT 11

at Michigan (no game)

OCT. 18

Tulane at Norfolk, Va. (no game)

OCT. 25

at Pennsylvania (35-7)

NOV. 1

Notre Dame at Baltimore (20-6)

NOV. 8

Maryland at Baltimore (no game)

NOV 15

at George Washington (52-0)

NOV. 29

Army at Philadelphia (14-0)

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Durham, N. H.

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T, split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 0, lost 7, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22 of 24
WATCH FOR: Bob Trouville-to-Pete Stewart pass combination

THE DOPE: The Blue Wildcats couldn't even get off the launching platform last season but are expected to go into orbit now with a red-hot passing game reminiscent of the old days. The air at Durham will be as full of footballs as it was during the unbeaten 1947 season and the 7-1 campaign of '54. Coach Clarence (Chief) Boston welcomes back all but three of his 24 lettermen, including veteran Quarterback Bob Trouville. Trouville topped the Yankee Conference in passing two years ago and could do it again. Lanky Halfback Sam Paul is also a passing threat. Pete Stewart returns to left halfback, where he set a school record last year by catching 25 passes. The corps of receivers includes sophomore Halfbacks Dick Eustis and John Robes and Ends Francis Frasier and Pete Paquette. Dan Ruskiewicz and Fullback Ray Donnelly will join Trouville and Stewart in the starting backfield. The interior line looks good with Bob Pascucci at guard and Henry Bigelow at tackle. If the Blue Wildcats' passing game clicks, they should enjoy a winning season.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

at Northeastern (no game)

OCT. 4

Rhode Island (13-28)

OCT. 11

at Maine (0-7)

OCT. 18

Delaware (6-59)

OCT. 25

at Brandeis (0-27)

NOV. 1

Connecticut (0-18)

NOV. 8

Springfield (6-28)

NOV. 15

at Massachusetts (7-7)

PENNSYLVANIA
Philadelphia

COLORS: Red and blue
BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 32
WATCH FOR: More passing by halfbacks to Ends Bill Kesack, Barney Berlinger

THE DOPE: If Coach Steve Sebo's recruits can master his tricky multiple offense, the Quakers will have the most diversified attack in the Ivy League. Penn is deep, but its potential doesn't compare with the league's top teams. The Quakers are solid in all but two positions. Biggest problems are replacements for Quarterback Frank Riepl and Fullback Bill Young. Hal Musick, starter in six games last fall, is available for quarterback duty along with Senior Tom Twitmyer, jayvee star Larry Purdy and George Koval. Musick, a good runner, may be shifted to halfback. Ed Goodwin and Bill Raser are Sebo's main hopes at full. Fred Doelling will probably start at right half and Jack Hanlon at left. Hanlon is the fastest man on the squad and will figure sharply in Penn's success this year. There will be more passing from the single wing by the left halfback playing tailback. Hanlon, fastest man on the squad last year, didn't pass once in '57. Penn will be stronger this year but with similar expectations from the rest of the Ivies, Quakers may find the first division too crowded.

SEPT. 27

Penn Stale (14-19)

OCT. 4

at Dartmouth (3-6)

OCT. 11

Princeton (9-13)

OCT. 18

Brown (7-20)

OCT. 25

Navy (7-35)

NOV. 1

at Harvard (6-13)

NOV. 8

at Yale (33-20)

NOV. 15

Columbia (28-6)

NOV. 27

Cornell (14-6)

PENN STATE
University Park, Pa.

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T and wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 3
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17 of 24
WATCH FOR: The brilliant ball carrying of versatile Dave Kasperian

THE DOPE: The Nittany Lions should post a winning record for the 20th straight year. Coach Rip Engle has lost only seven lettermen but must reshuffle his line to compensate for the loss of his first five ends. Maury Schleicher moves from fullback to end, opposite Norm Neff. Center Charley Ruslavage and Tackle Bill Wehmer are now guards. Captain Steve Garban is center and Joe Bohart and Andy Stynchula are tackles. Andy Moconyi, the Lions' third-best pass receiver last year, has been moved from wingback to fullback. Al Jacks heads a trio of returning quarterbacks. Jacks completed 51% of his passes for 673 yards and five touchdowns. Understudy Richie Lucas' arm accounted for 426 yards and four scores. Bob Scrabis is also a good passer. Engle's halfbacks include Dave Kasperian, Penn State's top ground-gainer and scorer; Eddie Caye; and Bruce Gilmore, leading rusher in 1956 who sat out most of '57 with a knee injury. Ten opponents enter the Lions' den this season and Pittsburgh, Army, West Virginia and Holy Cross may be the only ones to escape unscathed.

SEPT. 20

at Nebraska (no game)

SEPT. 27

at Pennsylvania (19-14)

OCT. 4

at Army (13-27)

OCT. 11

Marquette (20-7)

OCT. 18

at Boston U. (no game)

OCT. 25

Syracuse (20-12)

NOV. 1

Furman (no game)

NOV. 8

at West Virginia (27-6)

NOV. 15

Holy Cross (14-10)

NOV. 27

at Pittsburgh (18-14)

PITTSBURGH
Pittsburgh

COLORS: Blue and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19 of 30
WATCH FOR: Guard John Guzik, one of the game's better linebackers

THE DOPE: The Panthers are a rough and aggressive team that appears to be one year away from greatness. With six of his 11 starters back, Coach John Michelosen expects to unveil a tough defense and a wide-open attack featuring the running of Fullback Fred Riddle, Pitt's leading ground-gainer. The Panthers, traditionally a power-minded team, will pass more this year, with Quarterbacks Ivan Toncic (24 out of 50 for 436 yards and five TDs) and Bill Kaliden (40 of 93 for 519 yards) doing the throwing. Dick Haley and Joe Scisly, who last year gathered better than 700 yards between them, will be back at the halfback stations. With the graduation of such stars as Center Charley Brueckman, Tackle Jim McCusker and End Dick Scherer, the line will now be cemented together by Guards John Guzik and Ed Michaels. Art Gob and Jim Zanos are the front-line ends. If all of these, along with Tackles Ken Montanari and Bill Lindner, perform as expected the Panthers will be well on the plus side of a schedule that ranks among the nation's most testing.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

at UCLA (no game)

SEPT. 27

Holy Cross (no game)

OCT. 4

at Minnesota (no game)

OCT. 11

at Michigan State (no game)

OCT. 18

West Virginia (6-7)

OCT. 25

Army (13-29)

NOV. 1

at Syracuse (21-24)

NOV. 8

Notre Dame (7-13)

NOV. 15

at Nebraska (34-0)

NOV. 27

Penn State (14-13)

PRINCETON
Princeton, N.J.

COLORS: Orange and black
BASIC OFFENSE: Single wing
1957 RECORD: Won 7, lost 2
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16 of 29
WATCH FOR: A strong attack, starring Fred Tiley and Dan Sachs

THE DOPE: The Tigers scratched out a 7-and-2 record for the third straight time last year, devouring all but Colgate and Yale en route to their first championship of the Ivy League round robin. But Coach Dick Colman, who succeeded the late Charlie Caldwell at the start of last season, is confronted now with rebuilding a line and replacing Blocking Back John Sapoch. If he can also find adequate new tackles and guards, and Gene Locks develops at Sapoch's old position, the Tigers should repeat. Locks stepped in for the injured Sapoch in four games last year and did a most commendable job. Fullback Fred Tiley, Tailback Dan Sachs and Wingback Mike Ippolito give the Tigers plenty of offensive punch. Tiley led the team with 52 points and 592 yards rushing last season. Sachs, who sparked the Tigers in their title-deciding game with Dartmouth, was No. 2 man for the season with 48 points and a 6.0 rushing average. Princeton will have no trouble moving the ball, but the Tigers, as in '57, may have difficulty stopping other teams, particularly on passing.

SEPT. 27

Rutgers (7-0)

OCT. 4

Columbia (47-6)

OCT. 11

at Pennsylvania (13-9)

OCT. 18

Colgate (10-12)

OCT. 25

at Cornell (47-14)

NOV. 1

Brown (7-0)

NOV. 8

Harvard (28-20)

NOV. 15

at Yale (13-20)

NOV. 22

Dartmouth (34-14)

RHODE ISLAND
Kingston, R.I.

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 2, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 10 of 19
WATCH FOR: The pinpoint passing of Quarterback Roger Pearson

THE DOPE: The Rams are looking forward to another good year with a solid offense directed by two all-conference backs. But whether they're good enough to repeat the tie for the conference crown achieved last year depends on a questionable defense. Inexperience could hurt in the line where virtually every position is manned by a reserve or sophomore. Coach Herb Maack's big problems are the gaps left by Jim Gerlach, a leading Yankee Conference guard, and End Bob Mairs, the Rams' best pass receiver. Yet, in the final analysis, Rhode Island's success rests largely on the shoulders of Quarterback Roger Pearson, who is weak defensively but a master of the option play. Last year he completed 35 of 68 passes for 630 yards and four touchdowns. A sophomore, John Rollins, and a junior, Don Brown, will team up as halfbacks. Rollins is a strong and shifty runner who led the freshman team to its finest season in years. Brown is a powerful-running ex-Marine who is good on drive plays. Bill Poland, a nifty blocker and linebacker, will carry the load at fullback.

SEPT. 20

Northeastern (12-7)

SEPT. 27

at Maine (25-7)

OCT. 4

at New Hampshire (28-13)

OCT. 11

Brandeis (32-7)

OCT. 18

Massachusetts (27-13)

OCT. 25

at Brown (0-21)

NOV. 1

at Springfield (0-14)

NOV. 15

Connecticut (0-0)

RUTGERS
New Brunswick, N.J.

COLORS: Scarlet and black
BASIC OFFENSE: Single wing
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20 of 31
WATCH FOR: The running, passing and punting of Tailback Billy Austin

THE DOPE: The Scarlet Knights are hitching their wagon to a star called Billy Austin and expect to ride to their second winning season in nine years. The versatile Austin is one of the best backs in Rutgers' history, was first in the East and second in the nation last year with a total offense of 1,425 yards. He led the Knights in every department but pass receiving and developed sufficiently as a passer to complete just under 50% for 479 yards and three touchdowns. Now in its third season of single-winging, Coach John Stiegman's offense should really click behind a big, seasoned line. The team has 20 lettermen back, a good sophomore crop and, most importantly, seven of the starting team. Bob Nasco, Sam Crosby or John Makarevich will replace Quarterback Bill Whitacre, who graduated. Jay Hunton or Arnie Byrd will operate at right halfback, and Lloyd Seaman heads a team of four fullbacks. Bob Simms, the Knight's top pass receiver, and Dutch Wermuth excel at ends. All in all, old grads should have plenty to cheer about on the banks of the Raritan.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 27

at Princeton (0-7)

OCT. 4

at Colgate (48-6)

OCT. 11

Richmond (26-13)

OCT. 18

Bucknell (no game)

OCT. 25

at Lehigh (7-13)

NOV. 1

at Delaware (19-23)

NOV. 8

Lafayette (34-19)

NOV. 15

Quantico Marines (no game)

NOV. 22

Columbia (26-7)

SYRACUSE
Syracuse, N.Y.

COLORS: Orange and blue
BASIC OFFENSE: T and wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 5, lost 3, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 18 of 30
WATCH FOR: Plenty of power plays; Chuck Zimmerman's passes

THE DOPE: The Orangemen are slow but have enough old-fashioned straight-ahead drive to improve on their 5-3-1 record. Despite the loss of three top ends, including Dick Lasse, plus Center Mike Bill, Coach Ben Sehwarfzwalder has experienced men at most line positions. The front wall, averaging 210 pounds, is a mite faster than last year's, but the Orangemen lack breakaway speed in the backfield. Although no streak of lightning, Tom Stephens is the team's top scorer and best defensive back. Gerhard Schwedes, a reformed fullback, will operate from the other half. Jim Anderson is light but hits hard enough to replace Fullback Ed Coffin. Chuck Zimmerman could be better defensively, but he is a heady quarterback who completed 55% of his passes for 770 yards last year. The top lineman is Guard Al Benecick, a 222-pound weight lifter. There's no bright star like Jim Brown on the horizon but the Orangemen are trying to make up for this lack with solid team balance. They'll have to, with such opponents as Kansas and Navy coming up in '59.

SEPT. 27

Boston College (no game)

OCT. 4

at Holy Cross (19-20)

OCT. 11

Cornell (34-0)

OCT. 18

Nebraska (26-9)

OCT. 25

at Penn State (12-20)

NOV. 1

Pittsburgh (24-21)

NOV. 7

at Boston U., N (27-20)

NOV. 15

Colgate (34-6)

NOV. 22

at West Virginia (0-7)

TEMPLE
Philadelphia

COLORS: Cherry and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1957 RECORD: Won 1, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13 of 22
WATCH FOR: The passing and running of Quarterback Bud Fahey

THE DOPE: The Owls have considerably revised their ambitions since Pop Warner took them to the Sugar Bowl in 1935. When they could no longer keep up with such fast company as Michigan State and Texas, the Owls de-emphasized football. Now they're having difficulty keeping up with Delaware, Bucknell and other Middle Atlantic Conference teams. Coach Pete Stevens expected a great season last fall but injuries wrecked his plans, and the team managed only one victory. That one was sparked by Bud Fahey, Temple's best quarterback in years. Fahey sat out spring practice to rest a knee he injured last year, but if he's ready, the Owls could surprise. Fahey can run and pass, has a fairly experienced and speedy line in front of him and some power and speed behind him. He also has the receivers. Without him, it will be strictly a rebuilding year for Coach Stevens. Temple's running should be improved with the return of injured Halfback Chad O'Shea, and the presence of hard-driving Fullback Marv Slomsky and Halfback Dick Walsh.

OCT. 4

Delaware (7-71)

OCT. 11

at Muhlenberg (16-40)

OCT. 18

at Lafayette (13-12)

OCT. 25

at Scranton, N (no game)

NOV. 1

at Buffalo (6-13)

NOV. 8

Bucknell (6-19)

NOV. 15

Gettysburg (7-42)

NOV. 22

Hofstra (7-13)

VERMONT
Burlington, Vt.

COLORS: Green and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 2, lost 5
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14 of 21
WATCH FOR: A fleet of good running backs led by Roy Greene

THE DOPE: This is the year that the Catamounts were one away from. Coach Ed Donnelly has greater speed, depth and strength than he has enjoyed for some time and appears destined for a winning season. Vermont, which plays only one Yankee Conference opponent (Maine), will be strong up the middle with Captain Philip Chalifoux at guard and 6-foot-5, 215-pound Fred Branch at center. Quarterback Bob Flance saw only limited service behind "Whizzer" White last year but is a good enough passer and runner to get first call at that position. Vermont's halfbacks are fast both inside and out, with Roy Greene the real standout. He is the team's leading pass receiver and ground-gainer as well as a great pass defender and tackier. Louis Petronaci, an All-State end last year, provides added backfield speed. Bill Simonds tends to fumble but is a strong, seasoned fullback. Defense should mark this Vermont team. Pass receiving may be something of a worry; but even so the green hills of Vermont should be bright with victory this fall.

SEPT. 27

at Coast Guard (no game)

OCT. 4

Maine (0-49)

OCT. 11

at Hobart (no game)

OCT. 18

at Rochester (6-14)

OCT. 25

at Norwich (12-19)

NOV. 1

St. Lawrence (no game)

NOV. 8

Middlebury (7-13)

VILLANOVA
Villanova, Pa.

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T with flankers
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20 of 38
WATCH FOR: Daring running and passing by Quarterback Jim Grazione

THE DOPE: The Wildcats will try to chew up the Army, the Marines and eight other good opponents with a rebuilt team that is minus Billy Magee, last year's outstanding performer. Coach Frank Reagan hesitates to guess how he'll fare without his star quarterback and most of the cast that supported him. But Mainliners are not too worried. Jim Grazione, Magee's understudy, is the only experienced signal caller Reagan has, but he can do everything. Returning halfbacks are Dave Intrabartolo, a 175-pound scat-back capable of scoring from any distance, and the elusive Jim Ward. Leon Horin, a junior, may have to make room for Sophomore Billy Paczkoskie at fullback. The latter, a 225-pound schoolboy star, loves to run, is a proficient blocker and pass receiver and could be one of the best backs in the school's history. Reagan must rebuild the line around End Gene O'Pella, a huge, 6-foot-5, 235-pound passing target, and Bill Craig and Mike DeLucia at tackle and guard, respectively. The outlook for Villanova is for a very iffy season.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

West Chester State (no game)

SEPT. 27

VMI (no game)

OCT. 4

at Boston College (9-12)

OCT. 11

Detroit (7-16)

OCT. 18

Wake Forest (no game)

OCT. 25

Richmond (no game)

NOV. 1

at Wichita (24-6)

NOV. 8

at Dayton (no game)

NOV. 15

at Army (no game)

NOV. 22

Quantico Marines (no game)

WESLEYAN
Middletown, Conn.

COLORS: Cardinal and black
BASIC OFFENSE: T and wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15 of 24
WATCH FOR: The inspiring line play of Captain Dave Mitchell

THE DOPE: The Cardinals are not only loaded with lettermen and reserves but have excellent material available from an undefeated freshman squad. All of this points to a winning season for Coach Norm Daniels, although he needs to fill a gap at center and strengthen the end positions. George Komaridis and Harry Millis will alternate as replacements for Co-captain Jack Sickler in the middle of the line. Ends Gordon Biddle and Steve Pyle should help bolster the Cardinals' passing attack, which was weak last year. Bulwark of the strong defensive line is veteran Guard Dave Mitchell. Wesleyan's running game will be improved by a wealth of good backs, including Dick Wenner, Dave Eklund, Terry Smith and Dick Huddleston. With Rick Francis' playing eligibility consumed, Jim Sams appears as his likely quarterback successor. Also available is Senior Bing Leverich, although Sams has the edge in both passing and running. Dom Squatrito, a huge, jarring fullback, is one of the most promising sophomores. No Little Three title here, but a good record.

SEPT. 27

at Middlebury (6-28)

OCT. 4

Bowdoin (no game)

OCT. 11

at Coast Guard (20-7)

OCT. 18

Worcester Tech (38-9)

OCT. 25

Amherst (0-21)

NOV. 1

at Swarthmore (14-13)

NOV. 8

at Williams (13-28)

NOV. 15

Trinity (19-20)

WILLIAMS
Williamstown, Mass.

COLOR: Royal purple
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 0, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 38 of 51
WATCH FOR: Fast-breaking Halfback Chip Ide

THE DOPE: The Ephmen are blessed with 38 lettermen, including all but three starters from an undefeated 1957 team which averaged 387 yards per game. Coach Len Watters' athletes should easily retain the Little Three championship and are likely to celebrate another unbeaten season come November. They have depth at every position but center, a good running game, an above-average offensive line and a passing attack that speaks for itself (58% completions). Dan Fanning, a 6-foot-4, 215-pounder, and Rich Kagan head the fine corps of ends. The Ephmen are strong at tackle with 225-pound Bill Hedeman and 220-pound Bob Lowden, and the best defensive lineman is Guard Jim Richardson. Garry Higgins, a slow runner but smart operator, will call signals for an experienced backfield that includes Halfbacks Chip Ide and Bob Rorke. Ide is fast and averaged 9.8 yards per carry in '57. Bob Hatcher shifts from right half to share fullback duties with Bob Stegeman. There will be plenty of victory parties at Williamstown these autumn Saturdays.

SEPT. 27

at Trinity (25-6)

OCT. 4

Colby (26-19)

OCT. 11

Middlebury (32-19)

OCT. 18

at Bowdoin (no game)

OCT. 25

Tufts (26-26)

NOV. 1

at Union (65-0)

NOV. 8

Wesleyan (28-13)

NOV. 15

at Amherst (39-14)

YALE
New Haven, Conn.

COLOR: Blue
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 2, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15 of 30
WATCH FOR: The running of Halfbacks Herb Hallos and Rich Winkler

THE DOPE: The Elis have plenty of strength at tackle, guard and halfback but not much elsewhere. Coach Jordan Olivar has lost all three of his varsity centers and lacks experience at end. His worst losses are Quarterback Dick Winterbauer, the Ivy League's top passer (14 TD passes), Fullback Gene Coker, the Elis' top rusher, and End Mike Cavallon. After highly successful years with such standouts as Dean Loucks and Winterbauer, Olivar will have to experiment with untried sophomores at quarterback. This year Yale must lean heavily on Halfbacks Herb Hallas and Rich Winkler, Tackles Harry Olivar (son of the coach) and Al Puryear and Guards Paul Lynch and Bill West. Hence, Yale's running game should be strong, but the passing, heretofore Olivar's strong suit, will be weak in comparison to previous years. Yale is always dangerous for its traditional rivals, Princeton and Harvard, but unless Olivar can come up with a quarterback, the Elis will have trouble matching their third-place Ivy League finish of last season.

SEPT. 27

Connecticut (27-0)

OCT. 4

at Brown (20-21)

OCT. 11

at Columbia (19-0)

OCT. 18

Cornell (18-7)

OCT. 25

Colgate (20-0)

NOV. 1

Dartmouth (14-14)

NOV. 8

Pennsylvania (20-33)

NOV. 15

Princeton (20-13)

NOV. 22

at Harvard (54-0)

ILLUSTRATION PHOTOJACK CLOSE: JEFFS' NO. 1 RUSHER PHOTOBOB ANDERSON IS CADETS' BIG GUN PHOTOALAN MILLER: BC'S FOUR-YARD MAN PHOTOBU'S JOHN MAIO CAN RUN AND PUNT PHOTOBROWN PASSER FRANK FINNEY PHOTOJIM BRADY ANCHORS BUCKNELL LINE PHOTOAL JAMISON: EAST'S TOP RECEIVER PHOTOIVY'S BEST PASSER: DICK DONELLI PHOTOLARRY DAY IS UCONN'S TOP SCORER PHOTOCORNELL'S FULLBACK: PHIL TAYLOR PHOTOJOHN CROUTHAMEL PILES UP POINTS PHOTOBOB JONES ANCHORS DELAWARE LINE PHOTOBOB SHAUNESSY CAPTAINS HARVARD PHOTOHOLY CROSS AIR ACE TOM GREENE PHOTODON DILLEY HEADS LAFAYETTE LINE PHOTOCHARLES BURGER POWERS ENGINEERS PHOTOBOB PICKETT QUARTERBACKS MAINE PHOTOVETERAN GUARD LOU VARICHIONE PHOTOBOB REIFSNYDER HEADS NAVY LINE PHOTO'CATS TOP LINEMAN IS BOB PASCUCCI PHOTOGUARD RAY KELLY CAPTAINS PENN PHOTODAVE KASPERIAN: THE LIONS' PRIDE PHOTOJOHN GUZIK CEMENTS PANTHER WALL PHOTOFRED TILEY CAPTAINS THE IVY CHAMPS PHOTOROGER PEARSON, MASTER OF OPTION PHOTOBILLY AUSTIN, EAST'S TOP GAINER PHOTOAL BENECICK: ORANGE WEIGHT LIFTER PHOTOCHAD O'SHEA BRINGS HOPE TO TEMPLE PHOTOPHIL CHALIFOUX CAPTAINS VERMONT PHOTOUNDERSTUDY JIM GRAZIONE MOVES UP PHOTOCARDS' DAVE MITCHELL OPENS HOLES PHOTOSPEED IS CHIP IDE'S CONTRIBUTION PHOTOELIS DRINK TOASTS TO HERB HALLAS

IVY LEAGUE CONFERENCE
1957 STANDINGS

W

L

T

PTS

OPP

Princeton

6

1

0

189

83

Dartmouth

5

1

1

122

70

Yale

4

2

1

165

88

Brown

3

4

0

100

111

Pennsylvania

3

4

0

100

84

Cornell

3

4

0

87

111

Harvard

2

5

0

64

173

Columbia

1

6

0

41

148

YANKEE CONFERENCE
1957 STANDINGS

W

L

T

PTS

OPP

Rhode Island

3

0

1

80

33

Connecticut

3

0

1

56

6

Maine

2

2

0

63

44

Massachusetts

1

2

1

40

66

Vermont

0

2

0

13

63

New Hampshire

0

3

1

20

60

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)