THE WEST

The PCC dies and the Big Four is nearly stillborn
September 21, 1958

In recent years, the West has offered football spectators nearly as much excitement and breath-catching action off the playing field as on. The biggest sideline spectacle was, of course, the three-year death dance of the Pacific Coast Conference caused by scandals over illegal financial aid to athletes. Sadly, the PCC, which throughout most of its almost 43 years of existence was truly big league, was dissolved August 10, 1958 in Portland, Ore.

The blame can be laid directly at the feet of those over enthusiastic alumni booster clubs which have latched on to college football so eagerly in recent years. At California, UCLA, Southern California and Washington, this enthusiasm ignored all common sense as well as the best interests of the undergraduates. On their own initiative—but with the knowledge and passive endorsement of university authorities—the boosters were proselyting the outstanding football players in the West with offers that violated all conference strictures on financial aid to athletes. At UCLA and USC "payoff stations" were operated where players picked up the extra-legal expense money provided by the boosters.

It was inevitable that this state of affairs would sooner or later lead to grief. It did when the boosters themselves began to spill stories to the press about their rivals' misdoings, and pretty soon the whole tawdry business was public property and too unpleasant to ignore.

The memory of these scandals has been kept vividly and unhappily alive through a set of unprecedented penalties invoked upon the offending colleges by the PCC. All four schools received stiff fines and varying periods of probation which affected their Rose Bowl eligibility anywhere from one to three years. Players from USC and UCLA who had accepted illegal aid had to forfeit one year of playing eligibility. The penalties were the stiffest punishment ever handed out by the PCC, and the four penalized schools immediately reacted like mistreated children and started making plans to leave home.

Last month, less than two weeks after the Pacific Coast Conference had been formally dissolved (effective June 30, 1959), the four dissenters announced they had joined together to form a new conference, the Athletic Association of Western Universities, which was quickly nicknamed The Big Four. Dr. Glenn Seaborg, Chancellor of the University of California, spelled out The Big Four's plans for policing recruitment: "If a member institution has reason to believe that another is violating either the letter or spirit of [the new rules], it may undertake to resolve the differences by discussion with that institution.... You might say a man-to-man challenge."

At the very moment Dr. Seaborg was describing the new rules in San Francisco, UCLA's George Dickerson, who had just succeeded to the head coaching job of the late Red Sanders, was putting them into effect. Dicker-son busted into the office of the University of California's head coach, Pete Elliott, who was interviewing a high school athlete and his mother. Dickerson interrupted the interview to charge with a roar that California was trying to steal young athletes who had promised to come to UCLA by making under-the-table cash offers. An embarrassed Elliott promised to investigate the charge after receiving Dickerson's assurance that there would be no publicity. However, it wasn't long before the West Coast newspapers were happily splashing the story across their pages, and California, its dignity wounded, tried to look like Charlie Chaplin trying to pretend nothing has happened.

Curly Grieve, sports editor of the San Francisco Examiner, took a righteous, regretful view of the incident. He wrote that "UCLA has virtually torpedoed the so-called Big Four...the group is likely to be known as the Big Fourflushers...and may be stillborn.... The PCC, with a resounding death rattle, could conduct its own investigation of Dickerson's wild charges and UCLA's own recruiting and proselyting practices, or ask the NCAA to do it for them. In that event, one, both or all four schools just might be put on the shelf again for a long time."

Nonetheless, it is quite clear that—regardless of the stigma resulting from the scandals—USC, UCLA, California and Washington have been able to use them as a very convenient excuse for ridding their schedules of three unprofitable opponents. The PCC required its members to play a round-robin schedule on a home-and-home basis, and neither Oregon, Oregon State nor Washington State drew well in the stadiums of The Big Four.

While PCC football suffers through this organizational chaos, the situation on the field this season may be equally topsy-turvy. For this year it is not The Big Four but their lesser brothers of the Northwest that appear the most likely to succeed.

Oregon State, now in its fourth year under Coach Tommy Prothro, has the best chance of winning the PCC and being the conference's last official representative in the Rose Bowl. With Red Sanders gone, Coach Prothro now becomes the high priest of single-wing football on the West Coast. It was as a Sanders assistant at UCLA that Prothro learned The Method, and he employs virtually all of Sanders' tricky spinners and reverses—a very scintillating kind of football for the fan.

Washington State under Jim Sutherland, Ronnie Knox's old high school coach, will probably give Prothro the most trouble. Stanford could be brilliant or a flop, depending on whether Coach Jack Curtice (see page 116) can develop a passer to make his offense go.

Only a few years ago, the Skyline Conference was an obscure cluster of Rocky Mountain colleges which had fun Saturdays playing football—when the teams could get through the snowstorms. This year a vast improvement is expected in the over-all caliber of Skyline competition, and while the conference as a whole will remain a notch or two below major status on the nation's football map, it will have a scattering of individuals worthy of All-America consideration—Lee Grosscup of Utah in particular. As the nation's leading passer last year, he will have the whole country watching his performances.

AIR FORCE
Colorado Springs, Colo.

COLORS: Silver and blue
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23 of 26
WATCH FOR: Rushing of Halfback Phil Lane

THE DOPE: The Falcons have a new coach, Ben Martin, and some new opponents but everything else looks pretty much the same. The Air Force team is challenging such powers as Iowa, Stanford and Colorado with the same team that won only three of 10 games last season against a not-so-formidable lineup. Since the academy does not graduate its first class until 1959, ex-Virginia Coach Martin inherits all but three injured lettermen. Most of the ground gaining will be left to Halfback Phil Lane and Fullbacks Larry Thomson and Charlie May. Quarterback John Kuenzel, the Falcons' leading passer last season, missed spring drills and may yield to Eddie Rosane, who has experience but is prone to knee injuries. Chief target for the passers will be End Tom Jozwiak. Captain Brock Strom, a tackle, is the mainstay of the Falcon line which shows a marked improvement over last season's unit which gave up three touchdowns per game. If the defense can hold up under pressure, the academy might break even this season despite a tougher schedule.

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OCT. 18

Cincinnati, N (2-7)

OCT. 25

at Marquette (21-7)

NOV. 1

at Boston College (no game)

NOV. 8

San Jose State, N (21-6)

NOV. 15

Washington State, N (no game)

NOV. 22

at San Diego State, N (32-6)

NOV. 27

at Fresno State (34-12)

COLORADO
Boulder, Colo.

COLORS: Silver and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 3, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20 of 30
WATCH FOR: Punting, pass receiving, running of Track Star Boyd Dowler

THE DOPE: The Buffaloes are Oklahoma's major threat in the Big Eight Conference. Coach Dallas Ward has all but four of the starters who held the Sooners to a one-point victory last season, plus his pick from one of the best freshman crops ever. Ward's big loss is All-America Halfback Bob Stransky, the nation's second-ranking rusher. Triple-threater Howard Cook may shine at left half now that he's out of Stransky's shadow. The return of Quarterback Boyd Dowler, Halfback Eddie Dove and Fullback George Adams gives Colorado a strong running game. Passing has been just average but may be improved now that Dowler, who, incidentally, is also the conference's leading pass receiver, has been tutored in the art of throwing by the old master, Sammy Baugh, himself. Guards John Wooten and Bill Mondt and Tackle Bob Salerno, out a year with injuries, form the nucleus of a line that will depend heavily on such sophomore standouts as End Bill Elkins. The Buffs' offense is set; but the defense, especially against passing, needs tightening, and that will tell the story.

SEPT. 27

Kansas State (42-14)

OCT. 4

at Kansas (34-35)

OCT. 11

at Arizona, N (34-14)

OCT. 18

at Iowa State (38-21)

OCT. 25

Nebraska (27-0)

NOV. 1

Oklahoma (13-14)

NOV. 8

at Missouri (6-9)

NOV. 15

at Utah (30-24)

NOV. 22

Colorado State (20-0)

NOV. 29

Air Force (no game)

COLORADO STATE
Fort Collins, Colo.

COLORS: Green and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 7
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19 of 28
WATCH FOR: Speedy, aggressive Halfback Mark White

THE DOPE: The Aggies appear destined for another second-division finish in the Skyline Conference. Nineteen lettermen and some talented junior college transfers give Coach Don Mullison something to work with, but unfortunately it's not enough to worry the contenders. There will be a letterman at every position but few good reserves. The team is small and not very fast. Passing is better than average, however, and the Aggies should improve on their 3-7 record. Back to call offensive signals is Freddy Glick, 169-pound brother of Gary, the Pittsburgh Steelers' 1955 bonus pick. Freddy is rated a good defender, a fair runner and passer. Best of the backs is fast, rough Mark White. Wayne Schneider is another good halfback but has defensive shortcomings. Coach Mullison will get a lot of mileage out of small but slashing Fullback Alan Ashbaugh. Stalwarts of the light brigade up front include Guard Pat O'Donnell, Tackle Larry Graves and End Bill Hanks. Joe Keegan, 6-foot-4, 240-pound tackle, Quarterback Joe Crider and Guard Don Mason are promising sophomores.

SEPT. 27

at Drake, N (no game)

OCT. 4

Brigham Young, N (9-26)

OCT. 11

Air Force Academy at Denver (20-7)

OCT. 18

Wyoming (13-27)

OCT. 25

at Utah State (14-27)

NOV. 1

Montana (19-7)

NOV. 8

Utah (0-55)

NOV. 15

at New Mexico (7-30)

NOV. 22

at Colorado (0-20)

NOV. 27

at Denver (27-6)

DENVER
Denver, Colo.

COLORS: Crimson and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23 of 30
WATCH FOR: The tackling and blocking of Sal Cesario

THE DOPE: The Pioneers will field a better football team than the '57 club which finished third in the Skyline—and no wonder. The only conference team to beat champion Utah, they lose just seven lettermen, less than anyone else in the league. "The team that beats us this fall will have to play pretty good football to do so," says Coach John Roning. Denver has 23 lettermen plus 11 transfer students and some average sophomores. Roning's backfield is not so solid as his line, and he must find someone to replace Quarterback Al Yanowich. A likely starter is Junior Don McCall, a proven defender, signal caller and runner but a questionable passer; so transfer Quarterback Jack Jones may find plenty of work. Halfback Jim McDonnell could develop into one of Denver's alltime great running backs before his three seasons are up. He's fast and hard to bring down. Jack Work at halfback and Dan Loos, a driving fullback, round out the backfield. The talented forwards include End Steve Meuris, Tackles Sal Cesario and Bob Carter and Center Don Miller.

SEPT. 20

Oklahoma State (no game)

SEPT. 26

at Utah State, N (21-19)

OCT. 4

at Wyoming (14-13)

OCT. 10

Montana, N (26-13)

OCT. 18

at Utah (12-7)

OCT. 25

at San Jose State, N (20-27)

OCT. 31

New Mexico, N (19-0)

NOV. 8

Air Force Academy (26-14)

NOV. 15

Brigham Young (6-25)

NOV. 27

Colorado State (6-27)

IDAHO
Moscow, Idaho

COLORS: Silver and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: T with flankers
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 4, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 32
WATCH FOR: The smashing tackles of huge Jim Prestel

THE DOPE: The Vandals could have totaled seven victories with just 14 more points in the right places last season. They pack more offensive punch this time around. The defense also will be more experienced. Coach Skip Stahley has 21 lettermen returning but has lost six starters. Five of his linemen (two are still on his roster) have been drafted by the pros, and the 1958 forward wall, although big and fast, will still be somewhat short on experience. The line averages 215 pounds and perhaps the best of the lot is 6-foot-5, 255-pound Tackle Jim Prestel. Pete Johnson is the other tackle. Wade Patterson heads a corps of good ends, which includes 6-foot-5, 220-pound Sophomore Ron Ismael. Stan Fanning is the likely starting center, and Dan Hill moves into Jerry Kramer's guard spot. Stahley has lost two senior quarterbacks, pins his hopes on Junior Bob Eyler, a fine passer, and Sophomore Sil Vial, a good runner. Bob Dehlinger, Theron Nelson and Fullback Dick Pickett are strong and speedy backs. The Vandals will make trouble, but are not of true PCC caliber.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

at Oregon (6-9)

SEPT. 27

at Missouri (no game)

OCT. 4

at Utah, N (21-6)

OCT. 11

Washington State (13-21)

OCT. 18

Oregon State (0-20)

OCT. 25

at Arizona, N (no game)

NOV. 1

San Jose St. at Boise (no game)

NOV. 8

at Montana (31-13)

NOV. 15

Utah State (35-7)

MONTANA
Missoula, Mont.

COLORS: Copper, silver and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple offense
1957 RECORD: Won 2, lost 7
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23 of 38
WATCH FOR: Stan Renning, one of the best guards in the country

THE DOPE: The Grizzlies may be in for another rough year. They must master the multiple offense being used by Coach Ray Jenkins, former Colorado assistant who replaces Philadelphia Eagles-bound Jerry Williams. Montana also lost 15 lettermen through graduation, and the unkindest cut of all was the defection of Quarterback Earl Keeley to Canadian football. Keeley, an outstanding passer and punter, was counted on to inject life into the club. Jenkins may have a sleeper, however, in Sophomore Jim Monasmith, who completed half his 60 pass attempts for 500 yards in four freshman games. He'll team up with End Larry Myers, who caught 25 aerials last year for 349 yards and three touchdowns. Other bright spots in the line are Tackle John Gregor, a 225-pound sophomore, and Stan Renning, a superb guard and linebacker who was a second-team All-America in '57. The line is thin at ends but well stocked in the middle. The backfield is three deep in veterans and includes probable starters Bob Everson, Matt Gorsich and Fullback Joe Pepe.

SEPT. 20

at Utah, N (13-32)

SEPT. 27

Wyoming at Billings (0-20)

OCT. 4

at New Mexico, N (21-6)

OCT. 10

at Denver, N (13-26)

OCT. 18

Utah State (35-25)

OCT. 25

Brigham Young (7-20)

NOV. 1

at Colorado State (7-19)

NOV. 8

Idaho (13-31)

NOV. 15

Montana State (13-22)

OREGON
Eugene, Ore.

COLORS: Yellow and green
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1967 RECORD: Won 7, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 32
WATCH FOR: The blocking, receiving of End Ron Stover

THE DOPE: The Ducks of 1957 had to share the Pacific Coast plum with Oregon State, but they won the PCC nod for the Rose Bowl match against Ohio State. Coach Len Casanova's team is automatically ineligible for a second consecutive visit to Pasadena, but even so it might take the Conference crown as a consolation prize. The line is deep and as good or better than the '57 unit which led the conference on defense. The running and passing are good, and all that's needed is a reasonable job at fullback and some smart quarterbacking. Casanova will miss Quarterback Jack Crabtree, but Paul Grover and Dave Grosz may surprise here. Marian Holland replaces Fullback Jack Morris and Willie West shifts from the left side to supplant alltime Oregon rusher Jim Shanley. The five returning regulars include Charlie Tourville at left half. The line is bolstered by End Ron Stover, Tackle Jim Linden and Guard Bob Grottkau. Stover set a major bowl record when he caught 10 passes against a Buckeye team which had permitted only 59 completions all season.

SEPT. 20

Idaho (9-6)

OCT. 4

at Oklahoma (no game)

OCT. 11

USC at Portland, N (16-7)

OCT. 18

Washington State (24-13)

OCT. 25

at California (24-6)

NOV. 1

at Washington (6-13)

NOV. 8

Stanford (27-26)

NOV. 15

at UCLA (21-0)

NOV. 22

at Oregon State (7-10)

DEC. 6

at Miami (no game)

OREGON STATE
Corvallis, Ore.

COLORS: Orange and black
BASIC OFFENSE: Single wing, balanced line
1957 RECORD: Won 8, lost 2
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 31
WATCH FOR: The line crashing of Nub Beamer

THE DOPE: The Beavers have lost eight regulars from the team that beat Oregon on the last day of the season and tied for the Pacific Coast Conference championship. But Coach Tommy Protho will have a real West Coast power again despite the graduation of Joe Francis, one of the most brilliant backs ever seen at Corvallis. The star of the '56 Rose Bowl game has four willing successors, including Grimm Mason, Dainard Paulson and probable starter Larry Sanchez. Sanchez-is small but swift and a fine passer. The Beavers have good speed, particularly Wingback Earnel Durden, the fastest man on the squad. The bonecrusher in the backfield is Nub Beamer, and the probable blocking back is Gary Luke-heart. There's good speed and depth at all positions but end. All-Coast Center Buzz Randall, a bruising linebacker, is an anemia victim, may be out for the season. But Prothro still has Tackle Ted Bates, an All-America hopeful. The Beavers are not so strong as last year, but still might take the title if a talented tailback is found.

SEPT. 19

at USC, N (20-0)

SEPT. 27

Kansas at Portland, N (34-6)

OCT. 4

UCLA (7-26)

OCT. 11

at Wyoming (no game)

OCT. 18

at Idaho (20-0)

OCT. 25

Washington at Portland (6-19)

NOV. 1

California (21-19)

NOV. 8

at Washington State (39-25)

NOV. 15

at Stanford (24-14)

NOV. 22

Oregon (10-7)

SAN JOSE STATE
San Jose, Calif.

COLORS: Gold and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T and split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 7
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 11 of 24
WATCH FOR: A better balanced attack and sounder defense

THE DOPE: The Spartans will be rebuilding after winning only three of their 10 games last season. Coach Bob Titchenal has lost 13 of his 24 lettermen, will field a team short on experience at the guard and halfback positions. Titchenal's chief backfield loss is Ray Norton, starting left halfback last season, who runs the 100-yard dash in 9.3 seconds and has chosen track over football. There are only two seniors in the Spartans' starting lineup, but Coach Titchenal expects to have a sounder defense and a better passing and running game. Mike Jones, an experienced signal caller and good passer, will spearhead a backfield composed of Halfbacks Sam Dawson and Claude Gilbert and Fullback Kent Rockholt. The line averages 204 pounds and features End Dan Colchico, a good receiver and blocker. Center Ron Earl is probably the team's best linebacker. Bill Atkins has switched from tackle to guard. The Spartans are swapping blows with the likes of Washington, College of Pacific and Iowa State and will consider themselves fortunate to break even.

SEPT. 20

at Washington (no game)

SEPT. 27

Hawaii, N (12-0)

OCT. 11

California Poly, N (7-14)

OCT. 18

at Arizona State, N (6-44)

OCT. 25

Denver, N (27-20)

NOV. 1

Idaho at Boise, Ida. (no game)

NOV. 8

at College of Pacific, N (6-21)

NOV. 15

Fresno State, N (6-13)

NOV. 21

Iowa State, N (no game)

STANFORD
Palo Alto, Calif.

COLORS: Cardinal and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Spread T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22 of 37
WATCH FOR: One of Stanford's alltime great tackles, Troy Barbee

THE DOPE: The Indians have a new chief and will raise plenty of havoc on the warpath if Quarterback Bob Nicolet can learn to execute Coach Jack Curtice's tricky pass patterns. Curtice's first problem is to find the kind of adept and nimble passer on which his system depends. Nicolet, who throws accurately over any distance, is the leading candidate for the assignment; Sid Garber is another prospect. Curtice inherits 22 lettermen but only four regular starters. The entire first-string backfield is gone, and the new one is a distinct question mark. Both regular ends and one guard have also departed, but the line will be tough. Troy Barbee, a 232-pound tackle, is billed as the best in Stanford history and a sure All-America. Eric Protiva, a 222-pound Iranian, holds down the other tackle position. Guard Bob Peterson and Center Russ Steele are key figures. The backfield candidates include Jim Byrer, a dangerous runner, Fullback Rick McMillen and Halfback Doug Dick, who was out last year with a broken leg. The unpredictable Indians bear watching.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

at Washington State (18-21)

SEPT. 27

Rice (7-34)

OCT. 4

at Northwestern (26-6)

OCT. 11

Washington (21-14)

OCT. 18

Air Force Academy (no game)

OCT. 25

at UCLA (20-6)

NOV. 1

Southern California (35-7)

NOV. 8

at Oregon (26-27)

NOV. 15

Oregon State (14-24)

NOV. 22

at California (14-12)

UCLA
Los Angeles

COLORS: Blue and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Single wing, balanced line
1957 RECORD: Won 8, lost 2
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21 of 30
WATCH FOR: A great starting line led by Dick Wallen and Bill Leeka

THE DOPE: The Bruins, for half a season at least, will be a great team. UCLA, already hard hit by the untimely death of Coach Red Sanders, now tackles a rugged schedule with a strange sentence still to serve as a parting gesture to the moribund PCC. Eight seniors—six of them on the first string—have been deprived of five-games' eligibility by the conference for accepting unauthorized financial assistance. Included are All-America End Dick Wallen, All-Coast Tackle Bill Leeka and Tailback Don Long, the Bruins' total offense leader and high scorer the past two years. The UCLAns are barred from the Rose Bowl. If it's any consolation to them, this is the last season they'll play under PCC rules. Coach George Dickerson, who was Sanders' senior assistant, is expected to bring his team close to the top even on half power. Long, who completed 62.5% of his passes in '57, will probably be understudied by converted End Jim Steffen. Wingback Phil Parslow succeeds Bill Mason, an academic casualty.

SEPT. 20

Pittsburgh (no game)

SEPT. 27

at Illinois (16-6)

OCT. 4

at Oregon State (26-7)

OCT. 10

Florida, N (no game)

OCT. 18

at Washington (19-0)

OCT. 25

Stanford (6-20)

NOV. 1

Washington State (19-13)

NOV. 8

at California (16-14)

NOV. 15

Oregon (0-21)

NOV. 22

Southern California (20-9)

USC
Los Angeles

COLORS: Cardinal and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1957 RECORD: Won 1, lost 9
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24 of 34
WATCH FOR: The defensive play of Frank Fiorentino

THE DOPE: The Trojans' slow-footed-ness and inexperience cost them dearly last season and Coach Don Clark, now in his second year, hopes he has solved at least one of these problems. His accent is on sophomores who, although lacking savvy, will provide a great deal more speed. Only four seniors are likely to make the starting eleven. Three of them, Guard Frank Fiorentino, End Hillard Hill and Tackle Monte Clark, were hampered by ailments last season and should have starring roles. The fourth is Quarterback Tom Maudlin, who may have to yield to Willie Wood, a better passer. Three other seniors—Quarterback Jim Conroy and Halfbacks Tony Ortega and Rex Johnston—can play only five games by the same PCC edict that cripples UCLA. The likely sophomore starters include Halfback Angelo Coia, a speedy 200-pound transfer from The Citadel. There are also the McKeever twins. Both are 6 feet 1 inch, 215 pounds and fast, with Marlin at end and Mike at guard. The Trojans will find it difficult not to improve on a 1-9 record.

SEPT. 19

Oregon State, N (0-20)

SEPT. 27

at Michigan (6-16)

OCT. 3

North Carolina, N (no game)

OCT. 11

Oregon at Portland, N (7-16)

OCT. 18

California (0-12)

OCT. 25

Washington State at Spokane (12-13)

NOV. 1

at Stanford (7-35)

NOV. 8

Washington (19-12)

NOV. 22

at UCLA (9-20)

NOV. 29

Notre Dame (12-40)

UTAH
Salt Lake City

COLORS: Crimson and white
BASIC OFFENSE: T
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17 of 35
WATCH FOR: Lee Grosscup, one of football's most accurate passers

THE DOPE: The Utes suffered the heaviest losses of the Skyline Conference, and the 18 departed lettermen include Stuart Vaughan, the nation's leading pass receiver, and all-conference Fullback Merrill Douglas. But Utah still has Lee Grosscup, who completed 68.6% of his 137 passes for a national high of 1,398 yards (good for 10 touchdowns). However, Grosscup has had two right ribs cracked in practice. If new Coach Ray Nagel can rebuild the line, the Utes stand a good chance of repeating as Skyline champs. Nagel, ah assistant to Red Sanders at UCLA last year, will find only one starter returning to the line: End Jack Seul. Dick White, another end, and Guard Tony Polychronis will be key men on a forward wall which is notably poor in the middle, with not much help expected from a poor freshman team. The starting backfield will match the nation's best, if Grosscup can pitch and if last season's top rusher, Larry Wilson, now out with a broken hand, can mend quickly enough to aid Don McGivney, and Larry Fields in the running duties.

SEPT. 20

Montana, N (32-13)

SEPT. 27

at Brigham Young, N (27-0)

OCT. 4

Idaho, N (6-21)

OCT. 11

at California (no game)

OCT. 18

Denver (7-12)

OCT. 25

A.F. Academy at Denver (34-0)

NOV. 1

at Wyoming (23-15)

NOV. 8

at Colorado State (55-0)

NOV. 15

Colorado (24-30)

NOV. 27

Utah State (21-6)

DEC. 6

at Hawaii, N (no game)

UTAH STATE
Logan, Utah

COLORS: Blue and white
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T, wing T
1957 RECORD: Won 2, lost 7, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17 of 26
WATCH FOR: Triple-threat Back Overton Curtis

THE DOPE: The Aggies, with 10 lettermen returning to the line and seven to the backfield, hope they can make the jump from last place to first division in the Skyline Conference. Coach Ev Faunce's passing game has been weakened by the graduation of Quarterback Bob Winters, the No. 4 passer in the country in 1957. Merrill Johnson, his probable replacement, will find a splendid target in End Gary Kapp, who owns the second best pass-catching record in the land. However, the Aggies' strong ground game should offset any weakening in their passing. Behind Johnson in the split-T will be Halfbacks Overton Curtis and Jerry Pelovsky and Fullback Leo Ducharme. Curtis, a 63-point man last year, led the country in kickoff returns and ranked high in scoring, rushing and receiving. He is also a sharp passer, the Aggies' best defensive back and a solid All-America prospect. Ducharme is the hardest running back on the squad. Bob Steinke, converted from tackle to center, will be the mainstay of a line which also features End Ralph Brinton.

SEPT. 20

at Arizona, N (no game)

SEPT. 26

Denver, N (19-21)

OCT. 4

at Kansas State (no game)

OCT. 11

at New Mexico, N (10-14)

OCT. 18

at Montana (25-35)

OCT. 25

Colorado State (27-14)

NOV. 1

Brigham Young (0-14)

NOV. 8

Wyoming (19-19)

NOV. 15

at Idaho (7-35)

NOV. 27

at Utah (6-21)

WASHINGTON
Seattle, Wash.

COLORS: Purple and gold
BASIC OFFENSE: Split-T
1957 RECORD: Won 3, lost 6, tied 1
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20 of 34
WATCH FOR: A wide-open game with flankers and split ends

THE DOPE: The Huskies will open up their attack this season with improved passing provided by three green but promising quarterbacks. They are Bob Hivner, a transfer who quarterbacked Compton J.C. in the Little Rose Bowl game two years ago, and Bob Schloredt and Phil Borders, who alternated in '57 on an unbeaten freshman team. Coach Jim Owens' ground forces took a terrific pounding last season because the Huskies could complete a total of only 31 passes. The passing will be improved and should help offset a shortage of good running backs. Big loss among the seven graduated starters was Jim Jones, All-Coast fullback. But Owens still has his top ground-gainers, Halfback Mike McCluskey, and his prize breakaway back, Luther Carr. Washington has been stripped from tackle to tackle, and it will take time to rebuild the line. Top forward is probably Guard Don Armstrong. The Huskies managed only three victories last year but their victims included Pacific Coast co-champs Oregon and Oregon State. This is a better team than that one.

1958 SCHEDULES

(1957 scores):

SEPT. 20

San Jose State (no game)

SEPT. 27

Minnesota (7-46)

OCT. 4

at Ohio State (7-35)

OCT. 11

at Stanford (14-21)

OCT. 18

UCLA (0-19)

OCT. 25

Oregon State at Portland (19-6)

NOV. 1

Oregon (13-6)

NOV. 8

at Southern California (12-19)

NOV. 15

California (35-27)

NOV. 22

Wash. State at Spokane (7-27)

WASHINGTON STATE
Pullman, Wash.

COLORS: Crimson and gray
BASIC OFFENSE: Slot T with flankers
1957 RECORD: Won 6, lost 4
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 25 of 32
WATCH FOR: A wide-open passing game featuring Bobby Newman

THE DOPE: The Cougars are expected to enjoy their best season since 1930, when they gained a Rose Bowl bid. Coach Jim Sutherland has lost only seven of his 32 lettermen and the only missing regular is Tackle Gene Baker. Best of the returning linemen are Center Merl Hitzel and End Don Ellingsen, a 5-foot-10 end who caught 45 passes last year to rank first in the Pacific Coast Conference and third in the nation. Also back is End Jack Fanning, who caught nine touchdown passes—more than anyone in the nation—and injured End Bill Steiger, Quarterback Bobby Newman and Halfback Carl Ketchie. Steiger's pass receiving in 1956 was second best in the nation. He sat out 1957 with a dislocated neck. Newman topped the Coast in passing. He also led the nation in total offense. Ketchie is a deceptive runner and the Cougars' leading rusher. Washington State scored at least twice in every game last season but opponents piled up 161 points against them. This club will be even stronger offensively and, if the defense is tightened, might even wind up in the Rose Bowl.

SEPT. 20

Stanford (21-18)

SEPT. 27

at Northwestern (no game)

OCT. 4

at California (13-7)

OCT. 11

at Idaho (21-13)

OCT. 18

at Oregon (13-14)

OCT. 25

Southern Calif. at Spokane (13-12)

NOV. 1

at UCLA (13-19)

NOV. 8

Oregon State (25-39)

NOV. 15

at Col. of Pacific, N (no game)

NOV. 22

Washington at Spokane (27-7)

WYOMING
Laramie, Wyo.

COLORS: Brown and yellow
BASIC OFFENSE: Multiple, unbalancedline
1957 RECORD: Won 4, lost 3, tied 3
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 17 of 27
WATCH FOR: An array of good running backs

THE DOPE: The Cowboys are ready to ride herd on the rest of the Skyline Conference now that Coach Bob Devaney has successfully rounded up new talent. Devaney's multiple offense is stronger this year, and the defense, best in the league in '57, is just as good. He has 17 lettermen back who are familiar with his multiple offense, plus a flock of 26 top sophomores and transfer candidates. Wyoming has depth at all positions, but there appears to be more quantity than quality at quarterback. Jerry Wilkinson is the probable No. 1 replacement for graduate Larry Zowada. Coach Devaney must also plug up holes left by star Ends Wimp Hewgley and Russ Mather, Center Warren Benson and Fullback Greg Maushart, the team's top rusher in '57. The line will be built around Captain Dale Memmelaar, switched from tackle to end, Tackle Bob Houser and Guards Len Kuczewski and Paul Muratore. Devaney is knee-deep in good backs, including veterans Gene Domzalski, Hal Farmer, newcomers Bob Sawyer and Dennis Cook.

SEPT. 20

at Kansas State (12-7)

SEPT. 27

Montana at Billings (20-0)

OCT. 4

Denver (13-14)

OCT. 11

Oregon State (no game)

OCT. 18

at Colorado State (27-13)

OCT. 25

New Mexico (20-13)

NOV. 1

Utah (15-23)

NOV. 8

at Utah State (19-19)

NOV. 15

at Air Force Academy (7-7)

NOV. 22

at Brigham Young (0-0)

ILLUSTRATION PHOTOBROCK STROM CAPTAINS AIR FORCE PHOTOALL-CONFERENCE TACKLE JOHN KAPELE PHOTOBOB CHIAPPONE ANCHORS CAL LINE PHOTODICK BASS IS COP'S BEST BACK PHOTOBOYD DOWLER WILL LEAD COLORADO PHOTOPAT O'DONNELL GUARDS THE STATE PHOTODENVER'S CO-CAPTAIN, DON MILLER PHOTOJIM PRESTEL, A WHOPPING BIG TACKLE PHOTOFLEET MONTANA GUARD STAN RENNING PHOTOOREGON'S GLUE-FINGERED RON STOVER PHOTOTED BATES TACKLES FOR OREGON STATE PHOTODAN COLCHICO FLANKS SAN JOSE LINE PHOTORUSS STEELE ANCHORS INDIANS' LINE PHOTOBILL LEEKA STARTS WITH A PENALTY PHOTOTROJAN HORSE, FRANK FIORENTINO PHOTOLEE GROSSCUP, UTAH'S GREAT AIR ARM PHOTOGARY KAPP CATCHES STATE'S PASSES PHOTOHUSKIES RIDE WITH MIKE McCLUSKEY PHOTOCOAST'S TOP PASSER: BOB NEWMAN PHOTODALE MEMMELAAR, COWBOYS' CAPTAIN

PACIFIC COAST CONFERENCE
1957 STANDINGS

W

L

T

PTS

OPP

Oregon State

6

2

0

147

110

Oregon

6

2

0

124

81

UCLA

5

2

0

106

77

Washington State

5

3

0

146

129

Stanford

4

3

0

148

111

Washington

3

4

0

100

125

California

1

6

0

97

123

Southern California

1

6

0

54

135

Idaho

0

3

0

19

50

SKYLINE CONFERENCE
1957 STANDINGS

W

L

T

PTS

OPP

Utah

5

1

0

165

46

Brigham Young

5

1

1

99

61

Denver

5

2

0

104

104

Wyoming

3

2

2

114

82

New Mexico

2

4

0

75

91

Colorado State

2

5

0

89

178

Montana

2

5

0

96

148

Utah State

1

5

1

106

138

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)