Search

faces in the crowd...

Nov. 03, 1958
Nov. 03, 1958

Table of Contents
Nov. 3, 1958

Professional Basketball
Mr. Deadly
Triumph Of Class
Spectacle
  • In another of his series on Asia's lively games, traveling artist John Groth records exotic sports of Thailand, the subcontinent of India and Afghanistan

On Field And Campus
Horse Show
Pro Football
Food
Automobiles
  • By Kenneth Rudeen

    Thriving foreign automakers are busting buttons at London's big show this week—and eying the U.S. as eagerly as ever. Sports Illustrated here presents its own showing of new foreign cars

Tip From The Top
Steeplechasing
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

faces in the crowd...

Marilyn Painter, 21, a winsome senior from Pittsburgh at Penn State, was chosen as the Livestock Rodeo Queen at talent-filled Pennsylvania National Horse Show in Harrisburg.

This is an article from the Nov. 3, 1958 issue Original Layout

Mira Slovak, piloting Miss Bardahl in Sahara Cup hydro race, brought boat in second behind Miss U.S. I, even so won enough points to take national championship for Owner Ole Bardahl.

Danny Murtaugh, manager of Pittsburgh Pirates who brought team from obscurity to second-place finish in National League, was named major league manager of year in Associated Press poll.

Harry Kipke, greatest punter in Michigan history, All-America halfback there in 1922 and for 10 years head coach, was among nine men elected to Football Hall of Fame in New York.

Mrs. James Waldron, Louisiana boxing fan and mother of 11-year-old son, was appointed the state's first woman boxing commission chairman by Governor Earl K. Long to succeed her late husband.

Fred W. Hooper, contractor of Miami who raced such standout horses as Olympia and 1945 Kentucky Derby winner Hoop Jr., was made first president of American Thoroughbred Owners Assn.

J. Wolcott Brown, 55, Sea Girt, N.J. banker and southern senior golf titlist, shot par game on final day of North and South senior tournament to defeat Jack Brittain 7-6 at Pinehurst, N.C.

SEVEN PHOTOS