Especially for skiers

January 05, 1959

There is probably no human activity calculated to add more zest to the appetite than the business of navigating through snow on skis. No wonder, then, the increasing emphasis given to good eating as well as good drinking at ski centers across the country. "Ski heil and bon appetit are becoming more and more linked," says Denning Miller of Edson Hill Manor, Stowe, Vt.

How does the U.S. skier fare in the lodge dining room? What's the best thing for him or her to take along for a quick refueling on the slopes? The best snack to ask for in the warming hut? The most delightful pick-me-up at end of day? For some ideas of possible interest to ski buffs, the following compendium of information has been drawn together from expert sources.

SUN VALLEY, IDAHO
According to Ski School Director Sigi Engle: "Breakfast in the western fashion, of pancakes, eggs and bacon, is a must for skiers. You need a good foundation for the day."

MAMMOTH MOUNTAIN, CALIF.
Racing Skier Linda Meyers, member of the 1958 FIS women's team which competed in Austria, recommends a light breakfast, "nothing heavy, such as pancakes."

STOWE, VT.
The lodge at Smugglers' Notch has a unique one-dish meal called poule au pot Henri IV which is a lunchtime favorite (beef, fowl and vegetables in bouillon, served in a tureen and garnished with marrow, croutons and grated Parmesan cheese).

SQUAW VALLEY, CALIF.
Monty Atwater, in charge of snow safety for the Olympic Winter Games, favors heavily sweetened tea before skiing and on the slopes as the best source of nourishment, heat and stimulation.

ASPEN, COLO.
Aspen Ski School Co-director Fred Iselin, who strongly disapproves of drinking wine or other spirits while skiing ("It slows down your reflexes like mad"), nevertheless finds merit in the energizing properties of sugar lumps soaked with cognac for "when you need a little kick."

MONT TREMBLANT, QUE.
Old patrons say that the wonderful, restorative split-pea soup of habitant tradition, a specialty of the Lodge here, is not to be missed.

SUGAR HILL, N.H.
Roger A. Peabody, Executive Director, U.S. Eastern Amateur Ski Association, believes that not enough skiers pause for a nourishing lunch. "This is essential," he says, "to maintain bodily strength and thus reduce the hazards of accidents due to fatigue." For the problem of quick energy between meals, Peabody has a New England solution: a maple sugar sandwich.

ALTA, UTAH
National Ski Association President Alton Melville stuffs his parka pockets with dried pears—fruit which he grows and dries right at home.

TAOS SKI VALLEY, N. MEX.
Swiss fondue, a classic dish to be found almost everywhere that skiers gather, is a standout at Hondo Lodge, where it is called fondue taosienne. Made here with real Gruyère cheese, a Neuchâtel or dry Rhine wine, and kirsch, it is followed by a solitary apple served to each person in the Swiss tradition.

NORDEN, CALIF.
Walter Hoag, manager of the Sugar Bowl Ski Area and Lodge, says the universal diet of American skiers is the hamburger. At Sugar Bowl he estimates hamburger sandwiches outsell all others 20 to 1.

CANNON MOUNTAIN, N.H.
Mittersill purveys the most authentic and delicious Austrian food in this country. Notably worth trying are the Essigwurst (vinegar sausage with onion) and Palatschinken (paper-thin pancakes filled with ham).

ARAPAHOE BASIN, COLO.
Famed Ski Coach Willy Schaeffler, chief of skiing events for the 1960 Winter Olympics, carries raisins in his pockets for quick energy on the slopes and also recommends honey sold in tubes like toothpaste. Says Schaeffler: "The raisins and the honey it takes all the butterflies out of the stomach."

PITTSFIELD, MASS.
President Donald L. Soviero of Bousquet's Ski Area has an interesting daytime warmer-upper. This is Russian coffee—half coffee, half hot chocolate, topped with whipped cream and nutmeg. For after skiing, he favors hot buttered rum made with scalded cider instead of water. Gives it more zoom.

MT. HOOD, ORE.
Gloria Trantanella, an every-weekend skier who is also food editor of the Portland Oregonian, on the subject of after-ski fare says: "First of all, after coming off the slopes, a beer or two. A beer is it; first things first. Then a big pizza for the crowd."

MAD RIVER GLEN, VT.
Ski area president Roland Palmedo has a special trick for making Glühwein, the mulled red wine which is a popular drink at many U.S. ski centers. He recommends using a glass double boiler, through which the wine can be watched as it heats and prevented from boiling (which would vaporize the alcohol).

PHOTOLOUISE DAHL-WOLFEIN SKI CHALET built by Godfrey Rockefeller at Mad River Glen, Vermont, Mr. and Mrs. Rockefeller and guest Roland Palmedo (left) enjoy cups of steaming Glühwein.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)