QUESTION: Can you really "Wedeln" in deep powder and breakable crust or should you go back to rotation style in such difficult snow conditions?

January 19, 1959

DEEP-SNOW "WEDELN"
Not only can you Wedeln in powder and breakable crust, you should, because it is more efficient than rotation. The diagram at upper right shows why: in Wedeln, the skis slice through under the snow, rather than lifting and sinking each time as in rotation. In deep snow, the skier who is used to Wedeln on packed slopes must exaggerate his habitual slight forward bend of the knee (figure 1). To start deep-snow Wedeln, press knees well forward (figure 2) and initiate strong forward and upward body lift needed to overcome the increased resistance in difficult snow. (Skis stay practically at same level.) The "up" position attained as skis cross fall line (figure 3) is same for all types of snow. Final position for deep snow (figure 4) also has a deeper knee bend than the final position for packed slope skiing (figure 5), resulting in stronger heel push needed to swing through heavy snow or crust.

Comparison of styles shows that in Wedeln (upper diagram) skis slice back and forth through the snow with only slight up-and-down motion. But the skier using rotation (lower diagram) must lift his skis almost clear of snow and put them back in banked position.

1. START (PACKED SNOW)

2. START (DEEP SNOW)

3. FALL LINE (FOR BOTH CONDITIONS)

4. FINISH (DEEP SNOW)

5. FINISH (PACKED SNOW)

PHOTO SIX ILLUSTRATIONS
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)