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SOME LIKE IT COLD

March 09, 1959
March 09, 1959

Table of Contents
March 9, 1959

Look Who's Peeking!
Coming Events
Catamarans
Sullivan's Golf
Spring: The Quarterly Sporting Look Preview
Baseball
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

SOME LIKE IT COLD

A cold war of quite another sort, but of equal intensity, is being waged in Moscow between intrepid Muscovites and winter, and the comrades are winning, as our jaunting Travel Editor Horace Sutton discovered. Contemptuous of -15° weather, Muscovite men and women go swimming (separately) in the great outdoors at the Moscow Swimming Pool.

This is an article from the March 9, 1959 issue Original Layout

Although the water is heated to 81°, they think nothing of strolling about in the almost altogether, but that's just what the Soviet doctor ordered. The doctors agree that the temperature difference of air and water makes the blood vessels expand and contract—which is a good thing. However, a citizen needs a doctor's certificate before taking the plunge.

"Jumping in," says the sign, "is categorically forbidden." One good reason: constantly rising vapor from the pool obscures fellow swimmers in the water. To avoid cold-air shock, swimmers enter the pool from lockers by passing through chute below sign.

PHOTOHORACE SUTTONSUTTON, WHO SUBMERGED AS "POINT OF NATIONAL HONOR," CHATS WITH WIFEPHOTOHORACE SUTTONBUNDLED COACH INSTRUCTS SWIMMERS AT EVENING SESSION. THE POOL IS OPEN FROM 8 A.M. TO 10 P.M. DUES ARE $5 A MONTHPHOTOHORACE SUTTONSEXES MAY SWIM TOGETHER ONLY DURING THE "DIPLOMATIC HOUR" (1-2 P.M.), BUT ALL LOCKER ROOM ATTENDANTS ARE WOMENPHOTOHORACE SUTTON