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ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

April 13, 1959
April 13, 1959

Table of Contents
April 13, 1959

Ask Him Anything
Wondrous Wall
Florida Derby
Wonderful World Of Sport
They Call It Baseball
  • HERE, beginning with a few ideas on what one can expect in 1959, Sports Illustrated presents its fifth annual preview of the major league season, with pictures in both color and black and white, scouting reports, schedules, statistics and features

The Umpire
Scouting Reports
  • Even in an inflationary economy there is no safer and better return on your money than the 40¢ profit you get in the fall from the dollar you bet in the spring that the Yankees will win the pennant. New York will win again in 1959

  • The White Sox feel that this is the year the Yankees can be beaten. If such a feat is possible, this is the team that can do it, if only someone would start hitting home runs. The rest of the pennant-winning ingredients are all there

  • Let the small letter i represent the American League. The Yankees, of course, are the dot, so the best the Boston Red Sox can hope for is a place near the top of the stem. Much depends on whether life truly begins at 40 for Ted Williams

  • Colavito, Minoso, Piersall, Power and Martin are about as colorful a crew as you will find in baseball. The team as a whole isn't nearly as good as the perpetual second-place finishers of a few years ago, but it's going to be more fun to watch

  • Every spring the Tigers promise much, but when summer rolls around they deliver little. This year they are keeping quiet, hoping that this team of many stars can finally do what everyone feels it should do—contend for the pennant

  • The Orioles' outstanding pitching and good defense should guarantee a fight for any opponent. Last season they finished sixth, but a good sixth, just three games out of the first division. To finish in fourth place, then, is their goal for 1959

  • The fury of mass trading is just about over, and the Athletics are a lot closer to that glorious day when they will be able to boast 25 major leaguers on the roster. Nevertheless, a .500 season for Kansas City is still a remote possibility

  • The road to the American League cellar is paved with the good intentions of the Washington Senators. Baseball magnates feel it needs a major league club in the national capital, but Cal Griffith provides only the palest imitation of one

  • An original statistical report

  • The Braves are not too blasé to appreciate those fat World Series checks every fall. With a well-rounded band of seasoned players and the richest pitching resources in the league, Milwaukee will not be easily beaten. But it can be

  • The Pirates will be a stimulating team to watch this summer as they throw strong pitching, superior defense, sharp hitting and fast legs onto the field. They'll be nearly everyone's sentimental favorite and might just win it all

  • Talented young players with great arms, blazing speed, sure instincts in the field and powerful bats in their hands are the trademark of the 1959 Giants. Sophisticated San Franciscans are in for excitement if the pitching holds up

  • The great power teams of 1956 and '57 are gone, but so is the bad pitching that wrecked them. Changed also is last year's squad, which was unbalanced in the opposite sense. Now the Reds plan to field a ball club with a smoother blend

  • Bad days have fallen upon the St. Louis Cardinals, and the bright promise of two years ago has been faithless. The effects on the club of uncertain, divided direction and erratic trading policies are now being felt. Busch has a loser here

  • Heavy trading during the past two seasons and a thorough search of the farm system produced last year a hard-hitting lineup that gave the Cubs the best team they've had in a long time. There is, however, still lots of work to be done

  • Walter O'Malley made all the money he expected to last year. Now it's time for the Dodgers to start playing ball. This is too good a team to be fooling around down in the second division. It should be a more pleasant season for Los Angeles

  • The good old days for the Phillies were in 1950, when Manager Eddie Sawyer led the club to its first pennant in 35 years. Those days are gone, and the Phillies are back in eighth place. Once again it's Sawyer's job to take them on and up

Boxing
Horse Racing
Motor Sports
Food
Dogs
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

Bad days have fallen upon the St. Louis Cardinals, and the bright promise of two years ago has been faithless. The effects on the club of uncertain, divided direction and erratic trading policies are now being felt. Busch has a loser here

STRONG POINTS
The infield is good. Bill White, a 25-year-old power hitter who lost his job with the Giants when he went into the service, is the new first baseman; he is also a fine gloveman. Don Blasingame is a good second baseman and an ideal lead-off hitter. Speedy and aggressive, Blazer was hurt a lot last year but still managed to hit .274. Silent, dark Ken Boyer is probably the best all-round third baseman in the majors. He can hit with real power, ranges all over the left side of the infield, throws with a shotgun arm and runs like a greyhound on the bases. Milwaukee likes Mathews, but everybody else will take Boyer. Blond Joe Cunningham, a first baseman by trade, hits with power and will be in right. The nonpareil Stan Musial will be back to play his 17th season with the Cardinals. There's no one else like him in the National League, and No. 6 at the plate will always be an imposing sight. Hal Smith is a good catcher but his hitting fell off last year, and Gene Green, a powerful hitter with an equally powerful arm, will probably do most of the catching. Vinegar Bend Mizell, the pretzel-twisting lefty, always seems on the verge of being a winner, and Larry Jackson has been a durable reliever and starter. The thinking man's pitcher, Jim Brosnan, is a spot starter and strong long-relief man who has had an outstanding spring.

This is an article from the April 13, 1959 issue Original Layout

WEAK SPOTS
The outfield could be the worst in the league. Musial, in left at the request of new Manager Solly Hemus, lacks range and has a poor arm. With all due respect to The Man, now in the winter of his content, it's a question of whether he will drive in as many runs as he'll let in. In center is Gino Cimoli, the lackadaisical Latin. Cimoli proved in 1957 with the Dodgers that he can play a good outfield. He has range, a nice arm, and that year he hit. Last year he didn't. If somebody can coax him, perhaps he'll hit again. If not, he'll lose his job to the promising Curt Flood. Bobby Gene Smith can field but needs more experience as a hitter, while 34-year-old Irv Noren has the experience but not the youth. The pitching, spotty to begin with, became highly dubious with the departure of Sam Jones. Mizell and Jackson had impressive ERAs between them but lost more than they won. Once past them, there are only fading oldsters and untried rookies. Such ancients as Marv Grissom and Alex Kellner are being counted on as short-relief men. They may be too short. Gene Green doesn't help the pitching situation any when he's catching. A converted outfielder, he is still awkward behind the plate. There is not enough speed and a sad lack of power.

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES
The Giants gave away Ernie Broglio, a strong right-handed rookie who throws extremely hard, and who has looked good enough this spring to be a likely St. Louis starter. But if the Giants made a poor deal here, they more than got their own back by securing the Cardinals' best pitcher, Sam Jones, in exchange for two men the Giants couldn't use, Bill White and Ray Jablonski. White was tried in right field but had to be moved to first base; he hit only .241 after returning from the Army last year, but three seasons ago had 22 homers with the Giants. Third baseman Jabbo will spend most of his time on the bench; he hits the long ball, but not frequently. Short on reliable relief men, the Cards picked up 41-year-old Marv Grissom and 34-year-old Alex Kellner, and for more power on the bench grabbed First Baseman George Crowe, who hit 31 homers for the Reds just two years ago. Gino Cimoli, who doesn't add power, and Chuck Essegian, who may, might help out. Alex Grammas will be better at short than any of his predecessors, but five home runs and a .254 batting average over the last five years tell the story of his hitting career. Nineteen-year-old infielder Julio Gotay is an exciting prospect who can hit with power; he's being tried at shortstop, but he has a scatter arm and needs experience. If any pitching help other than Broglio is to come the Cardinals' way, it will have to be from rookie right-handers Gary Blaylock and Bob Gibson or returning right-hander Lindy McDaniel.

THE BIG IFS
Stan Musial's excursions into left center in chase of fly balls might take precious points off his batting average, and then where would the Cardinals be? If Hemus can light a fire under Gino Cimoli or if Curtis Flood or Bobby Gene Smith can hit the way they field, the outfield might be less frightful to contemplate. And if Mizell would finally find himself this year, and if Ernie Broglio really comes through, the staff might be able to look the rest of the league in the eye.

THE OUTLOOK
The Cardinals, who used to be the symbol of speed, power, pitching and good young players, simply don't have it any more. A new manager is no substitute for new talent, which the Cards don't grow much of any more. It would be nice to say that St. Louis will be right back up there fighting for first place, but they'll have a tough time keeping out of last.

View this article in the original magazine

PHOTOJOE CUNNINGHAM (ABOVE) WAS SLATED TO BE MUSIAL'S SUCCESSOR AT FIRST. CARDS' OUTFIELD WEAKNESS FORCED HIM TO BE SHIFTED TO RIGHTPHOTOMUSIALPHOTOBOYERPHOTOBLASINGAMEPHOTOCUNNINGHAMPHOTOGREENPHOTOH. SMITHPHOTOGRAMMASPHOTOCIMOLIPHOTOJACKSONPHOTOBROGLIOPHOTOMIZELLPHOTOBROSNANILLUSTRATION

BASIC ROSTER

NO.

NAME

POSITION

1958 RECORD

1

GENE GREEN

C-RF

.281

2

HAL SMITH

C

.224

6

STAN MUSIAL

LF

.337

10

ALEX GRAMMAS

SS

.218

11

DON BLASINGAME

2B

.274

14

KEN BOYER

3B

.307

15

JOE CUNNINGHAM

1B

.312

18

GEORGE CROWE

1B

.275

21

CURT FLOOD

OF

.261

22

GINO CIMOLI

CF

.246

24

BOBBY GENE SMITH

OF

(minors)

25

IRV NOREN

OF

.264

26

BILL WHITE

1B-RF

(service)

29

CHUCK ESSEGIAN

RF

.246

32

ERNIE BROGLIO

P

(minors)

33

WILMER MIZELL

P

10-14

34

ALEX KELLNER

P

7-5

37

JIM BROSNAN

P

11-8

39

LARRY JACKSON

P

13-13

42

MARV GRISSOM

P

7-5

PAST PERFORMANCE CHART

YEAR

FINISHED

WON

LOST

GAMES BEHIND

1958

5T

72

82

20

1957

2

87

67

8

1956

4

76

78

17

1955

7

68

86

30½

1954

6

72

82

25

INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

BATTING

PITCHING

1958

MUSIAL

.337

JONES

14-13

1957

MUSIAL

.351

JACKSON
L. MCDANIEL

15-9

1956

MUSIAL

.310

DICKSON

13-11

1955

MUSIAL

.319

ARROYO

11-8

1954

MUSIAL

.330

HADDIX

18-13

HOME RUNS

RUNS BATTED IN

1958

BOYER

23

BOYER

95

1957

MUSIAL

29

ENNIS

105

1956

MUSIAL

27

MUSIAL

109

1955

MUSIAL

33

MUSIAL

108

1954

MUSIAL

35

MUSIAL

126

HOME SCHEDULE

*Night game

APRIL

SAN FRANCISCO

10*,11*,12

LOS ANGELES

24*,25*,26

MAY

CHICAGO

7*,8*,9,10,10

CINCINNATI

12*

MILWAUKEE

13*,14*

PHILADELPHIA

15*,16,17,17

PITTSBURGH

19*,20*,21*

CHICAGO

25*

JUNE

MILWAUKEE

9*, 10*, 11

CINCINNATI

12*,13,14,14

PHILADELPHIA

16*,17*

PITTSBURGH

19*,20,21,21

JULY

LOS ANGELES

2*,3

SAN FRANCISCO

4,5,5

CINCINNATI

14*,15*,16*

MILWAUKEE

17*,18*,19

CHICAGO

20*,21*

AUGUST

PITTSBURGH

4*,5*,6*

PHILADELPHIA

7*,8,9,9

SAN FRANCISCO

10*, 11*

LOS ANGELES

13*,14*,15*,16

MILWAUKEE

25*,26*,27

CINCINNATI

28*,29,30

SEPTEMBER

PHILADELPHIA

15*

PITTSBURGH

17*

CHICAGO

19,20,21*

LOS ANGELES

22*,23*

SAN FRANCISCO

25*,26,27